Is the Xeon 1230v3 or I5-4770k better for Gaming while running Fraps recording program on the side?

Hi all. I am just curious since these 2 CPU's are roughly about a $10 difference. Which would you choose if you only had these 2 cpu's as a choice?

Intel i5-4670k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116899

or Xeon E3-1230 V3
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116906

Can you tell me what differences there are between the Xeon and i5 or i7? What makes the i5 or i7 better for gaming if over clocking was not an option for any of them? How are they better optimized for gaming use? Can you give specifics? I haven't really looked at any charts comparing the i5 or i7 to the Xeon when running games. I am sure there are some out there but it wouldn't surprise me if the Xeon is next to them in performance.

I can only go for either an i5 or the Xeon which again is only a $10 difference. With the Xeon, it at least has HyperThreading, which is important for me since I am going to be using recording programs such as Fraps to record while being in games which should help with that. Xeons are also built to last a long time or produce less heat as well?

Others on this same forum say the Xeon is like getting a stock or locked i7 (being a few hundred MHz slower) for an i5 price. This would actually change if I make use of the Turbo Boost feature of the Xeon making it go to 3.7ghz. I am not into over clocking a cpu too much (if you consider Turbo Boost to be over clocking), so one that can go up to 3.7ghz is fine with me and you are not paying extra for "integrated graphics" which gets disabled once you use a dedicated graphics card.

I am just making these same points that others have, so.. I am still open to your all's ideas or thoughts if you really think an i5 is better for gaming, but would you get the Xeon because of hyperthreading or what would be your reasons of your choice? How is the i5 better made for gaming? Would there even be much of a difference? The Xeon would probably help more with games in the future as well correct?

Thanks for your thoughts or understanding of these cpu's and if you can provide some charts showing how the Xeon compares to the i5 or i7, that would be cool too! :)
43 answers Last reply
More about xeon 1230v3 4770k gaming running fraps recording program side
  1. Hello... http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_lookup.php?cpu=Intel+Xeon+E3-1230+v3+%40+3.30GHz
    You get no CPU Video with Xeon... BUT you get i7 HT performance... and Cool lower watt #'s... No Overclock.
    http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_lookup.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i5-4670K+%40+3.40GHz&id=1921
    You get CPU video... No HT... You can OverClock...

    My needs with Audio Recording Software using HT and Video Card... is the Xeon.
  2. Cool. Thanks for the fast response. If you were not even going to make use of the CPU Video since going to be buying a dedicated graphics card anyways, that really wouldn't be a usable feature for the i5 or i7 though? How much are the i5 or i7's that are "not" over clockable since I don't really want to do that? I would search this up myself, but I am not sure what their model numbers are. The ones without a K are non-overclockable correct?
  3. Hello... YES, you need a "Z" MB to use a "K" CPU for Overclocking, with extra Cooling/Cooler needs... NON-K's are not OVERCLOCKABLE...
    You can use a MB/CPU video to run another Low Performance 1080P Dual monitor setup... internet surfing, Document reading/editing... it is a Kewl feature from a MB/CPU... great at the office or at home...
    It all depends on your personal needs... you have options.
    You Will have 8 EIGHT CPU cores Available/Visable to Windows and Programs with the XEON !!! or any i7.
    You have 4 FOUR with a i5.
  4. The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K
  5. Hi, here's the thing

    Do you mean i5 4670k? which the xeon 1230 v3 beats whether the i5 is overclocked or not.

    or the i7-4770k which is at stock as fast as the 1230 v3 but beats the 1230 v3 when the 4770K overclocks.
  6. Hello... You have the OPTION to use ECC memory if your MB supports it or standard non-ECC... But basically it is a i7-4770 with NO GPU... and Don't those Passmark numbers look SWEET!!!
  7. Eggz said:
    The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K


    I believe OP meant the i5 4670k, not the i7 4770k.

    In this case, I assume your response would be different. The Xeon 1230v3 is no different than an i7 4770, it just lacks an integrated GPU and is a few hundred MHz slower, as well as supporting ECC Memory but it is not a necessity. After typing this out, I just noticed that Ironsounds had already replied.

    OP If your concern is multitasking while gaming then take the Xeon. If it was pure gaming you would be able to OC the 4670k for a little more performance, but honestly that Xeon won't bottleneck anything and the benefits of hyperthreading will allow you to multitask more easily.

    When looking at benchmarks I suggest you compare the i7 4770(k) and i5 4670(k) both at stock speeds, as that's essentially what you'll be getting. Any particular games of interest?
  8. AshyCFC said:
    Hi, here's the thing

    Do you mean i5 4670k? which the xeon 1230 v3 beats whether the i5 is overclocked or not.

    or the i7-4770k which is at stock as fast as the 1230 v3 but beats the 1230 v3 when the 4770K overclocks.


    Hi. I know that sounds confusing when I brought the i7 into the question as well. Sorry about that. I guess I just wanted an overall comparison since I will be using the turbo boost for the Xeon (3.7ghz), but I was really seeing if someone would buy the i5 over the Xeon though.
  9. Eggz said:
    The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K


    Hi. Is ECC much slower than RAM memory? I was looking to get DDR3 1600mhz. Does self correcting mean it lasts longer? or self corrects certain kind of errors within the memory itself?

    Here is CPU Boss comparing the i5 with the Xeon.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i5-4670K

    I am concerned with too much over clocking. I would want the CPU to last a long time.

    Thanks for your response! :)
  10. Ironsounds said:
    Hello... You have the OPTION to use ECC memory if your MB supports it or standard non-ECC... But basically it is a i7-4770 with NO GPU... and Don't those Passmark numbers look SWEET!!!


    Passmark numbers? Are these ratings? Thanks for clarifying. :)

    Oh you mean this? I think I found it: http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Xeon+E3-1230+v3+@+3.30GHz
  11. luzhun said:
    Eggz said:
    The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K


    Hi. Is ECC much slower than RAM memory? I was looking to get DDR3 1600mhz. Does self correcting mean it lasts longer? or self corrects certain kind of errors within the memory itself?

    Here is CPU Boss comparing the i5 with the Xeon.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i5-4670K

    I am concerned with too much over clocking. I would want the CPU to last a long time.

    Thanks for your response! :)


    I remember reading that ECC is about 2% slower than non-ECC RAM.
  12. Overclocking doesn't make a CPU last MUCH longer than it would normally.

    I'd say the extra threads of the xeon 1230 v3 are superior to mere clock speeds in terms of future proofing.

    Higher end CPU's last longer than lower end ones, OC or not and that's the bottom line.
  13. JOOK-D said:
    Eggz said:
    The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K


    I believe OP meant the i5 4670k, not the i7 4770k.

    In this case, I assume your response would be different. The Xeon 1230v3 is no different than an i7 4770, it just lacks an integrated GPU and is a few hundred MHz slower, as well as supporting ECC Memory but it is not a necessity. After typing this out, I just noticed that Ironsounds had already replied.

    OP If your concern is multitasking while gaming then take the Xeon. If it was pure gaming you would be able to OC the 4670k for a little more performance, but honestly that Xeon won't bottleneck anything and the benefits of hyperthreading will allow you to multitask more easily.

    When looking at benchmarks I suggest you compare the i7 4770(k) and i5 4670(k) both at stock speeds, as that's essentially what you'll be getting. Any particular games of interest?



    Hi again Jook-D. Thank you once again for replying to me on this new post (as you did on another one). That's awesome. I think the other one closed because the topic was getting off subject, so I just started this one being more relevant, lol.

    Umm.. it is mainly Skyrim (heavily modded - HD texture over haul packages Skyrim) for the most part plus running Fraps recording program on the side while playing games. I would also like to ensure the system lasts and is able to keep up with the latest games for years to come as some mentioned before that HT would help, with those additional cores, in future games once they start making use of them. That is why I do not consider over clocking as an option (most likely severely limiting myself by doing this, but my loss then), if Turbo Boost is not considered as over clocking.


    That is also why I am going for 1600mhz memory since that is the highest standard without over clocking if I am correct, so the memory will last a long time too. :)
  14. Count me in on the 1230 v3 crowd.
  15. get the 1230 v3.

    Overclocking doesn't improve performance THAT significantly when compared to extra threads + You don't need to play about with any settings which is a win-win.
  16. Thanks everyone for your answers. Umm.. if I could afford an i7, should I end up getting that? How much is a non-overclockable i7? I am sure it is cheaper than the 4770k? Would it run more hot than the Xeon? How does it compare to it? :D
  17. JOOK-D said:
    luzhun said:
    Eggz said:
    The 4770k is made for gaming, and the Xeon is made for servers. The difference is mainly in two respects: (1) overclocking, and (2) memory.

    OVERCLOCKING: Possible on 4770k but not on Xeon. This will get data to the video cards much faster, which will help performance in games.

    MEMORY: Xeon supports ECC memory, which self-corrects for stability. The 4770k doesn't.

    They seem to be roughly the same chip tuned for different uses. If you're into gaming, don't go with a server processor. It's slowed down in several ways to make it very stable and reliable. They are meant to be in a closet for a year at a time without having to fuss with them. Gaming CPUs, on the other hand, are meant to be tinkered with. You want to max out performance, and you shouldn't mind fine tuning things constantly. Push it to the point where you have trouble, and then adjust from there to get the most out of it. Server CPUs won't even give you that option.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i7-4770K


    Hi. Is ECC much slower than RAM memory? I was looking to get DDR3 1600mhz. Does self correcting mean it lasts longer? or self corrects certain kind of errors within the memory itself?

    Here is CPU Boss comparing the i5 with the Xeon.

    http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Xeon-E3-1230-v3-vs-Intel-Core-i5-4670K

    I am concerned with too much over clocking. I would want the CPU to last a long time.

    Thanks for your response! :)


    I remember reading that ECC is about 2% slower than non-ECC RAM.


    Ahh here you go Jook-D: http://www.crucial.com/kb/answer.aspx?qid=3692

    I saw another Thread started on Toms Hardware about ECC Memory and the conclusion was that it was pointless for home users or for gamers. Hmm..
  18. Hello... Memory $$ has trippled in the last year... Due to current Non-ECC Prices, USED ECC 8gb sticks are much cheaper on EBAY now... but I have not looked into or tested "How current 77 and 87 Model boards" will accept them, by just using these Xeon models. ???

    Also There is the E3-1240 v3 3.4-3.8 Ghz
    if you want a socket 1155 MB get v2 versions... socket 1150 for the v3 versions...
  19. Xeon 1230 v3 and i7 4770 perform very similarly but xeon costs less but has no integrated graphics and neither have heat issues even on stock cooler, if you want a cooler superior to stock just grab something like the cooler master tx3 its only about $18
  20. JOOK-D said:
    I believe OP meant the i5 4670k, not the i7 4770k.

    You're right. Sorry about the confusion. Nonetheless, I still recommend getting the non-server processor.

    More cores on a gaming PC is a bad idea compared to faster cores (assuming you have at least 4 cores).

    Games use only 2-3 cores (rarely more). That means your Xeon with 8 logical processors will be treated as a 2 or 3 core processor. Putting more cores in the same physical space results in slower cores. Also, hyperthreading's logical cores are slower still. All said and done, a game utilizing 2 cores on the Xeon might actually only utilize 1 physical core (i.e. two threads on the same core). Given that the Xeon core itself is slower than the i5's, especially counting overclocks, you're buying a slower machine when it comes to gaming.

    If you don't believe me, just test your game on the Xeon chip your considering and watch the "Performance" tab in task manager. You'll get not much more than 25% usage. That means that only one of the four physical cores is doing anything, and that core is working as hard as it can. If it goes over 25% by a little, then other cores are still doing almost nothing.

    You have to remember that these chip actually have four independent processors on them, in the same way you'd get if you installed four single-core processors onto a motherboard with four CPU sockets.

    I have a 3930k OCed to 4.2 Ghz, which has 6 cores and 12 logical processors, and I am convinced that a 4770k or 4670k would have more gaming headroom because each core on those processors is faster, even though the chips cost half as much. More cores is only for software that knows what more cores are, and most games simply have no idea how to recognize more than 2 or 3 cores.

    As for overclocking, don't worry about it as long as you have a decent cooler and don't increase your clock speed more than 800 Mhz - 1 Ghz. The lifespan depends mostly on heat. If cooled properly, the lifespan will maybe decrease from 10 years to 8 years, but you no one keeps gaming chips that long anyway.
  21. Uhm...the guy wants to game+record/stream so the extra hyperthreading helps.
  22. AshyCFC said:
    Uhm...the guy wants to game+record/stream so the extra hyperthreading helps.

    True, but it helps at the cost of his game's performance.

    luzhun said:
    If I could afford an i7, should I end up getting that?

    If you can afford the 4770k, that is the superior chip of all mentioned here. Get that.
  23. 4770k is only really superior if the OP wants to overclock. The 1230v3 is an i7 without IGP and far cheaper. Not to mention the cheaper motherboard that can be used. Would give more money for a better GPU. They could pair up a 1230v3 with even an H81 board and save a crapload vs buying a 4770k and a Z87 board.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
    Total: $449.98
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)


    vs

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.30 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus H81M-A Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $299.29
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)

    An extra $150 for a gpu can go a long way.
  24. logainofhades said:
    4770k is only really superior if the OP wants to overclock.

    . . .

    An extra $150 for a gpu can go a long way.


    A good point. At this point, it comes down to personal preference. Given that the 4770k is meant to be overclockec - hence the "K" in the name - it should be overclocked.

    But price on a video card will probably see a more tangible performance gain for playing games, though not so much for recording them. A bit of a tradeoff, it seems, will arise from prioritizing playing games vs. recording them
  25. Unless you overclock, the 4770k recording performance wouldn't be much different than the Xeon.
  26. also the xeon isn't much more than the 4670k so you're hardly trading off gpu power.
    $10 difference on partpicker.

    So how does the Xeon 1230 v3 help with streaming/recording at the cost of his games performance?
  27. It wouldn't at all. Get a cheaper motherboard, get better gpu, done.
  28. logainofhades said:
    Unless you overclock, the 4770k recording performance wouldn't be much different than the Xeon.

    You said that above, and I agreed. I still agree.

    AshyCFC said:
    also the xeon isn't much more than the 4670k so you're hardly trading off gpu power.
    $10 difference on partpicker.

    Agreed.

    AshyCFC said:
    So how does the Xeon 1230 v3 help with streaming/recording at the cost of his games performance?

    I'm mainly comparing to the 4770k. I know the 4770k came up during the thread and that the OP originally was considering the 4670k, but the title of this thread is "Is the Xeon 1230v3 or I5-4770k better for Gaming while running Fraps recording program on the side?"

    Also, OP ended up considering it as an option later on in the thread.

    luzhun said:
    If I could afford an i7, should I end up getting that?

    So that's where I was coming from with all the 4770k talk.

    Not trying to get into a flame debate.

    Just to clarify, here is how the performance for gaming + recording breaks down

    Fastest to slowest
    1) 4770k (whether or not OCed)
    2) 4770
    3) 4670k (if OCed; otherwise, swap this with the 1230 v3)
    4) 1230 v3

    Here is how the price breaks down

    Mos expensive to least expensive
    1) 4770k - $339 on Newegg
    2) 4770 - $309 on Newegg
    3) 1230 v3 - $249 on Newegg
    4) 4670k - $239 on Newegg

    If OP has $90 extra to throw at a processor, do it and get the 4770k; otherwise, the 1230 v3 is the best deal for the performance. The 1230 v3 and the 4770 are almost identical, but the 1230 v3 is $50 cheaper. So the 1230 v3 wins out over the 4770, no problem. I don't think the 4670k is going to serve your needs at all, given that it's only $10 more for the 1230 v3 (agreeing with logainofhades on this).

    Now, with all of that out there, I'm still recommending the 4770k. If you're going to keep a computer for years, $90-$115 is totally worth it, man. Get the right processor for the right job. This is a gaming rig.

    And, to end, OP will be fine regardless. These are all good chips. Happy shopping, and best of luck to everyone.
  29. Mhm okay, I understand now with vs the i7 thing.

    I thought you meant vs the i5.

    I agree either 1230 v3 or 4770k depending on budget.
  30. Eggz said:
    logainofhades said:
    Unless you overclock, the 4770k recording performance wouldn't be much different than the Xeon.

    You said that above, and I agreed. I still agree.

    AshyCFC said:
    also the xeon isn't much more than the 4670k so you're hardly trading off gpu power.
    $10 difference on partpicker.

    Agreed.

    AshyCFC said:
    So how does the Xeon 1230 v3 help with streaming/recording at the cost of his games performance?

    I'm mainly comparing to the 4770k. I know the 4770k came up during the thread and that the OP originally was considering the 4670k, but the title of this thread is "Is the Xeon 1230v3 or I5-4770k better for Gaming while running Fraps recording program on the side?"

    Also, OP ended up considering it as an option later on in the thread.

    luzhun said:
    If I could afford an i7, should I end up getting that?

    So that's where I was coming from with all the 4770k talk.

    Not trying to get into a flame debate.

    Just to clarify, here is how the performance for gaming + recording breaks down

    Fastest to slowest
    1) 4770k (whether or not OCed)
    2) 4770
    3) 4670k (if OCed; otherwise, swap this with the 1230 v3)
    4) 1230 v3

    Here is how the price breaks down

    Mos expensive to least expensive
    1) 4770k - $339 on Newegg
    2) 4770 - $309 on Newegg
    3) 1230 v3 - $249 on Newegg
    4) 4670k - $239 on Newegg

    If OP has $90 extra to throw at a processor, do it and get the 4770k; otherwise, the 1230 v3 is the best deal for the performance. The 1230 v3 and the 4770 are almost identical, but the 1230 v3 is $50 cheaper. So the 1230 v3 wins out over the 4770, no problem. I don't think the 4670k is going to serve your needs at all, given that it's only $10 more for the 1230 v3 (agreeing with logainofhades on this).

    Now, with all of that out there, I'm still recommending the 4770k. If you're going to keep a computer for years, $90-$115 is totally worth it, man. Get the right processor for the right job. This is a gaming rig.

    And, to end, OP will be fine regardless. These are all good chips. Happy shopping, and best of luck to everyone.


    Thank you Eggz for clarifying all of that and for all of the details. I know you said earlier, if one did over clock, to keep it under 1ghz to be safe? Also, would a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO do well for a nice cpu cooler? or a Noctua NH-U9B SE2 (may be more quiet)?
  31. logainofhades said:
    4770k is only really superior if the OP wants to overclock. The 1230v3 is an i7 without IGP and far cheaper. Not to mention the cheaper motherboard that can be used. Would give more money for a better GPU. They could pair up a 1230v3 with even an H81 board and save a crapload vs buying a 4770k and a Z87 board.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
    Total: $449.98
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)


    vs

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.30 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus H81M-A Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $299.29
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)

    An extra $150 for a gpu can go a long way.



    Wow! That price difference was surprising. I could get a GTX 770 with that instead of having to go for a 4gb 760. Not sure if those H motherboards have multi-core enhancement like the Asus z87k though?
  32. Ironsounds said:
    Hello... Memory $$ has trippled in the last year... Due to current Non-ECC Prices, USED ECC 8gb sticks are much cheaper on EBAY now... but I have not looked into or tested "How current 77 and 87 Model boards" will accept them, by just using these Xeon models. ???

    Also There is the E3-1240 v3 3.4-3.8 Ghz
    if you want a socket 1155 MB get v2 versions... socket 1150 for the v3 versions...


    Wow! I did not know about the Intel Xeon E3-1240 v3 (3.4-3.8 Ghz). I may go for that one since it is not too much more. Is there anymore Xeons in that price range that I may be missing or leaving out? :D
  33. The 1230 v3 or 1240 v3 are the ones worth looking at.

    1240 is 13dollars more than the 1230 for a gain of 0.1ghz, not worth it in my opinion.
  34. Hello... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Xeon_microprocessors
    Yes... there are Many... But Not priced in my comfort zone... as a i7 3770/4770 performance equal.
    You can make up the $$ difference by buying the 1155 MB vs a 1150 right now, for the e3-1240 v2.
  35. luzhun said:
    logainofhades said:
    4
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Microcenter)
    Total: $449.98
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)


    vs

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.30 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus H81M-A Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $299.29
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-06 10:41 EST-0500)

    An extra $150 for a gpu can go a long way.



    Wow! That price difference was surprising. I could get a GTX 770 with that instead of having to go for a 4gb 760. Not sure if those H motherboards have multi-core enhancement like the Asus z87k though?


    I am not sure why these two particular motherboards were cherrypicked, but it seems like it was just to prove a point.

    Getting a "k" series chip will not necessarily cost you any more money when it comes to motherboards unless you're interested in only the lowest-end equipment, but it seems that you want quality parts.

    Below is a list of motherboards filtered by two compatibility criteria: (1) LGA1150, and (2) Intel 4th generation Core i5, i7. Thus the list shows only boards that will support the Haswell line of chips.

    The list contains 193 different boards, ranging in price from $43.99 to $539.99. Looking just at the Z87 chipset, there are101 different boards, starting at $89.99. But most importantly, there are several different motherboards that cost about $100 from reputable brands like Asus, ASRock, MSi, and Gigbyte.

    Yes, if you buy a more expensive motherboard, you'll end up spending more money than if you buy a cheaper one, but that is all anyone can conclude by comparing two PC Picker examples.

    Luzhun, it's worth it to research this stuff yourself (as I'm sure you've begun to do). There are great tools like the one I linked below. There's no reason to rely on a single price point highlighted in these fora. As I'm sure you know, there are, many, many options when it comes to PC parts, and there's simply no way around sifting through the weeds a little bit when you have preferences. The link below is a great place to start, but be sure to use search filters on Newegg to get your thoughts in the right ballpark.

    The 193 motherboards that accept Haswell -- http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007627%20600438202%20600438203&IsNodeId=1&bop=And&Order=PRICE&PageSize=100

    To be clear, I don't mean to bash on logainofhades at all. What he is suggesting might be totally right for you, but keep in mind that his post suggests an entirely different chipset (H81). That is a mainstream chipset, not a gaming or performance chipset. As you mentioned in your response to his post, the chipset may not support all the features you want. Will it work for you? Maybe. Just read up to find out. Below is a great article breaking down the differences in name, intended use, and performance for the different Haswell chipsets (i.e. Intel Z87, H87, & H81)

    Different haswell chipsets -- http://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/1132-intel-haswell-chipset-comparison

    Here is the summary from that article, but it's still worth reading:

    Quote:
    I've already stated this throughout the above text, but we can simplify things pretty heavily:

    If you enjoy playing with settings, tweaking, and getting your hands dirty in DIY-type modifications, then opt for Z87 and K-SKU CPUs.

    If you don't care for any of the above and simply want to play games and leave BIOS alone for the duration of the system's life, opt for H87.

    If you're building a function-limited HTPC or desktop machine, consider H81, but favor H87 for its higher build-quality.


    Good luck!
  36. Hello... My MB Chipset of choice/builds at this time, for a "Non-K" 1155 and 1150 is Q77 and Q87... I think this version is overlooked for its Performance features and Value http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_1155
    The Onboard Intel Lan is a Performance increase for my Connections vs other Onboard Chips I've had... Adds intel vPro features, USB3, Realtek ALC887 with 6 physical connections, optical S/PDIF Out connector...
    1 x HDMI port
    1 x DisplayPort
    2 x USB 3.0/2.0 ports
    4 x USB 2.0/1.1 ports
    2 x SATA 6Gb/s connectors (SATA3 0/1) supporting up to 2 SATA 6Gb/s devices
    4 x SATA 3Gb/s connectors (SATA2 2/3/4/5) supporting up to 4 SATA 3Gb/s devices
    Support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 10
  37. What particular features are important to you?
  38. Hello... always re-read my Posts... I edit my thoughts and "true" meaning ( inspirations) over time...
    It's basically has more than a Z model board but not the OVERCLOCK... this is a Intel vPRO full feature chipset great for the Office or Home... you only can get 2 PCIe x16/x8 slots max... as a Z could have 3...
  39. Hi all. Eggz is right in that I need to do more research about the different chip sets. I am checking his links out still.
    As for motherboard features, I would like it to at least have 1 PCI-e 3.0 so that the GTX 760 will be at it's best or full speed? Also, several USB 3.0's and Sata 6gb/sec connections would be nice.

    I am already using a creative labs external sound card that has S/PDIF (Optical) output, so that is not a necessity anymore.

    I know most motherboards offer Turbo-Boost which will allow the Xeon to run at it's max 3.7ghz with the 1230 v3 or 3.8ghz with 1240 v3 in one single core but I would like to have it run at that max speed in all cores under any amount of load which is why MCE or Multi-Core Enhancement is also important. I would probably end up buying one of those 2 CPU coolers I mentioned before (Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO) or (Noctua NH-U9B SE2) to help it more since it will be running like this at all times (when the PC is on of course, lol). Perhaps the Noctua NH-U9B SE2 since it will be more quiet but then I believe you have to put the fans on the heatsink yourself if I am correct, so I may go with the Cooler Master.


    Now we are getting off topic again talking about motherboards, video cards, and cpu coolers. A moderator may close this soon, sigh.

    Thanks everyone again for your replies and recommendations! They have been helpful. I am going to be looking at motherboards again after I read up on the different chip sets thanks to Eggz information. :)
  40. A mod won't close your topic for going off topic, you're a person who wants help with his Processor and it's accompanying parts such as Cooler and Mobo at the same time it's not an Issue.

    I think H81 chipset is too basic for you.

    If you choose to get the xeon go for B85 or H87.

    http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Z87-H87-H81-Q87-Q85-B85-What-is-the-difference-473/

    If you choose the i5 4670k it's pointless to sit it on stock speeds (just get a 4440 instead if you don't want to OC) so you'll need a quality Z87 mobo.
  41. Nice response, clear and concise.
  42. Thanks for your answer AshyCFC. After reading your link, I may just go with the Asus Z87k after all since it will have the Lake Tiny feature (SSD power optimization along with SSD Caching), and so that I know Turbo Boost will function at it's best since I will be able to also use MCE with that board.

    This has been fun. Although a moderator did close my other topic about the graphics card and cpu bottlenecking concern. His/her short response was: "This thread is more than a week old and full of off-topic posts" even though it had charts and other useful information, sigh.

    I think everyones' response here solves my original question though. I can't really think of anything else to ask regarding the computer. I have my parts list made. Yay! =)
  43. Congrats!
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