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Need help setting up routers up for my room.

Last response: in Networking
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March 5, 2014 1:17:22 PM

Hey there! Thanks for reading!

So, I just build myself a decent gaming computer wich im enjoying very much. The computer itself doesnt have a Wi-Fi adapter, so i currently have it connected directly to the main router. (All will be explained in the picture wich i made. Yes, it is not pretty, but it works :)  )

When we ordered the internet bundle wich we have now, we accidently got two routers instead of one. We could send it back, but we decided to keep it in case I wanted to do something like this. Glad we did!

So heres my question: Is it possible to set up the router, and if so, how? Do i need to do something to the router, or will it just work?
And It is not necessary, but if possible, can i make a 2nd Wi-Fi Network with that 2nd router?


What i currently have on my Gaming Computer:

If you need any more info, give ma a shout! i will be happy to help you!

Thanks in advance!

Mr_Brammetje

More about : setting routers room

March 5, 2014 1:25:42 PM

Router 1
DHCP Enabled local IP set to 192.168.0.x series
Obviously router 1 has the internet configured for it.

Router 2:
Run your cat 6 cable into the wan port, set it to auto config (So it will pick up an IP from your DHCP off Router 1).
Set DHCP in router 2 to 192.168.1.x series

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March 5, 2014 1:33:16 PM

moulderhere said:
Router 1
DHCP Enabled local IP set to 192.168.0.x series
Obviously router 1 has the internet configured for it.

Router 2:
Run your cat 6 cable into the wan port, set it to auto config (So it will pick up an IP from your DHCP off Router 1).
Set DHCP in router 2 to 192.168.1.x series



Will there be any loss of Download/Upload/Ping?
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March 5, 2014 1:40:02 PM

Nope with it being wired in, should be smooth sailing all the way.
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March 5, 2014 1:52:17 PM

moulderhere said:
Nope with it being wired in, should be smooth sailing all the way.


I dont get it, can you explain one more time what i have to to with the DHCP host ect... i know like, not all that much about this stuff...
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March 5, 2014 1:57:59 PM

Router 1 you need to manually set the local IP as
192.168.0.x the x means the range of that class so from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.255

You hook the cable going to your 2nd router to the wan port, set router 2's wan port Ip to auto (some are called DHCP for internet provider), so it knows that you are automatically providing one of the IP's from your router 1 to Router 2 (this is how they'd talk to each other).
In router 2 you set the IP address scheme to 192.168.1.x so the range would be 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.255
You need to change router 2's log in IP address to 192.168.1.1

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March 5, 2014 1:59:46 PM

Router 1's log in IP would be 192.168.0.1
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March 5, 2014 2:06:39 PM

moulderhere said:
Router 1 you need to manually set the local IP as
192.168.0.x the x means the range of that class so from 192.168.0.1 to 192.168.0.255

You hook the cable going to your 2nd router to the wan port, set router 2's wan port Ip to auto (some are called DHCP for internet provider), so it knows that you are automatically providing one of the IP's from your router 1 to Router 2 (this is how they'd talk to each other).
In router 2 you set the IP address scheme to 192.168.1.x so the range would be 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.255
You need to change router 2's log in IP address to 192.168.1.1



Currently it is like this:


When i try to set it to 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.252 it says:
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March 5, 2014 2:11:00 PM

Gateway and router Ip dhcp must be in same range.
So for example this says 192.168.2.1 to 252 so your gateway is in the same range.

So if you change this address pool start Ip to 192.168.0.2 and end IP is 254 the gateway ip must be 192.168.0.1
You will have to change the gateway Ip first by the looks of things before changing dhcp range.

I think it is complaining as you may have to change the gateway address first prior to changing dhcp range.
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March 5, 2014 2:19:40 PM

This is the norm for networking
192.168.0.1 would be the IP address of the router to log in and change the settings (also known as gateway).

You would then have a DHCP range from 0.2 to 0.254 for all the devices, etc. 255 is the broadcast.
Most home routers usually default to a DCHP range of 100. Which means 100 devices (pc's, tablets, laptops, etc). If a tablet say had the right network information to connect to the wireless network it would grab a IP address from the DCHP range. So this example would be 192.168.0. say 25, then like a laptop could be on ip 45 (192.168.0.45).

So your example:

Main Router
Gateway address (as if you were sitting on your main family pc would be 192.168.0.1 in my example.
The DHCP range (or how many devices it can connect up to would be up to 254

Router 2 using DHCP for WAN port would grab a IP address from router 1. So when you log into router 2, your WAN port would say an IP address fo 192.168.0.200 or something.

Your Router 2 IP scheme would have to be different, so my example I say use default gateway as 192.168.1.1 which means it uses a 192.168.1.x scheme. So 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.255 as your default gateway for router 2 would be 192.168.1.1

Your gaming computer would pick off an IP address from Router 2's DHCP range so something like 192.168.1.35 and the PS3 would get 192.168.1.29

Just as examples.
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March 5, 2014 2:34:24 PM

moulderhere said:
Gateway and router Ip dhcp must be in same range.
So for example this says 192.168.2.1 to 252 so your gateway is in the same range.

So if you change this address pool start Ip to 192.168.0.2 and end IP is 254 the gateway ip must be 192.168.0.1
You will have to change the gateway Ip first by the looks of things before changing dhcp range.

I think it is complaining as you may have to change the gateway address first prior to changing dhcp range.


Pffft, cant see how to change it...
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!