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Part Recommendations for Gaming/Video $500 to $600 dollar build.

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March 5, 2014 3:20:16 PM

Greetings!

As the thread title states, I'm looking for parts recommendations for a gaming/Video editing (Adobe After Effects) build in the range of $500 to $600 dollars.

My plan for this computer is to use it for both gaming and video editing. The most demanding thing I play right now is Skyrim, loaded up with quite a few mods. I'm really wanting to be able to play the upcoming games this year, such as Watchdogs and Dying Light, as well as games from last year such as CoD: Ghosts and Splinter Cell.

I already have a 500w Thermaltake PSU from my current build, so I don't need one of those.

My Current GPU is an EVGA GTX650 1GB that I got on sale last year. It's served me well so far, but I wouldn't be adverse to upgrading if I could get a good deal (The new EVGA GTX750 Ti 2GB FTW is looking very good right now...) I Run on an older Dell 'Square' monitor at 1280x1024 resolution, but might upgrade later this year.

I am looking to upgrade to an 8-core CPU (Was thinking the FX-8320) and 16GB of ram.

On the RAM, I already have 8GB, consisting of 2x4GB Sticks of GSkill Sniper at 1333. I was thinking of getting 2x8GB Sticks to make up the 16GB, but it would be cheaper to get two more Gskill sniper 4GB sticks. If there is no performance problems coming from that route, I would easily go that way.

I know that 16GB might be argued as being overkill for gaming, but again, I also do video/audio editing and can use the extra power.

For the Mobo, My original thoughts were to get the GIGABYTE GA-970A-UD3P...

I also already have an OS (Windows 7).

Finally, I would prefer to shop at newegg, but it's not completely necessary...

Thanks,
Looking forward to your replies!
a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
March 5, 2014 4:01:57 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34Nxp
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34Nxp/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34Nxp/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core Processor ($154.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3P ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($76.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 270 2GB Video Card ($195.99 @ Staples)
Total: $614.08
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-05 19:01 EST-0500)

I'm assuming you already have a case and a HDD. I added a SSD for a faster system and loading your resources. Also assumed a case.

Gave you a 270 GPU which is much faster than a 750ti, but if the overall price is a bit high, which it is above your budget, you can cut it down to a 750ti. Also gave you a cpu cooler as FX chips run hot and you will be running CPU intensive tasks.
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March 5, 2014 4:28:06 PM

woltej1 said:
I'm assuming you already have a case and a HDD. I added a SSD for a faster system and loading your resources. Also assumed a case.

Gave you a 270 GPU which is much faster than a 750ti, but if the overall price is a bit high, which it is above your budget, you can cut it down to a 750ti. Also gave you a cpu cooler as FX chips run hot and you will be running CPU intensive tasks.


Thanks a lot!

I do have a HDD (two of them in fact, 500GB and 1.5T) I planned on running them alongside the new Main HD until I could shift necessary files around and then using them as storage drives anyway.

In reference to the SSD that you dropped in there, forgive me for sounding like a newbie. I know that there have been problems with SSD's in the past, are the new ones stable? Are there any problems/issues that I would need to know about?

Also, I like the choice of GPU, but I'm wondering if there is a comparable Nvidia card that would come in about the same price, or if, for instance, the 750TI that I mentioned is the next best card. I'm not YET playing at huge resolutions, though I might upgrade my monitor later this year if I can get a good price on one. Even then I am willing to knock down resolution a notch or two in return for kicking graphics power up (I've played on my current resolution for so long that it's become fine for me ;)  ).

As for case, I do have one. I had thought of upgrading but it might push the price too far out of budget right now. A keyboard and mouse are already going to have to be purchased on top of the computer build, so I might just use the same case.

Thanks again!
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a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
March 5, 2014 5:08:07 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core Processor ($154.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G43 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($59.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($76.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Inwin GT1 Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $588.07

Here's a build using the 750ti and also a new case.

SSDs are perfectly stable now and are used in any mid range and above gaming rig, or just to speed up any system. The way you use them with a HDD is to have the OS and all programs on the SSD, then things like music or videos go on the HDDs. There are plenty of guides on how to set this up and it is pretty simple.

the 750ti is pretty much the closest to the 270, but is it is a little slower. The 650 ti boost would be the closest to the 270 and is a little faster than the 750ti, but it has been discontinued.
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March 5, 2014 8:26:44 PM

woltej1 said:

Here's a build using the 750ti and also a new case.

SSDs are perfectly stable now and are used in any mid range and above gaming rig, or just to speed up any system. The way you use them with a HDD is to have the OS and all programs on the SSD, then things like music or videos go on the HDDs. There are plenty of guides on how to set this up and it is pretty simple.

the 750ti is pretty much the closest to the 270, but is it is a little slower. The 650 ti boost would be the closest to the 270 and is a little faster than the 750ti, but it has been discontinued.


I want to thank you again for taking the time helping me price out this build! It's a great help!

I have a couple quick questions.

First, I see there are three different 'editions' of the 750ti from EVGA. They have different clock speeds I know. Is there a benefit for going with the higher/highest version? Specifically this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I have had overall good luck with Nvidia cards, so I suppose I'm trying to stay with them for now.

I dropped out the case on the last build you gave and switched the MB for the Gigabyte, and the GPU for the one referenced above, and that priced me out to $602.07, which, while a little high, is pretty acceptable.

This brings me to my second question:
How future-proof is that card? I know it's not the top of the line, but I understand that it's a pretty great mid-range card...will I have to replace it in the next two years or so if I hope to really be able to play games? Or will it last me for quite a while?

And finally my third question, kinda inter-related with that last one, and maybe a matter of opinion...
Is that GPU going to be bottlenecking this system at all? Would it be better to take the GPU out of the combo for now (Buying a case + Keyboard + Mouse in it's place), and stay with my GTX650 1GB until next month rolls around and I get some more extra cash to spend, and then go for say a GTX760?

Thank you again for all your help! If I'm not making sense in those questions, let me know...haha...
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a b 4 Gaming
a b à CPUs
March 5, 2014 8:34:30 PM

Well that card has much better cooling and would be worth it.

The 750ti is running on next gen architecture so it will be as future proof as any card at that price range.

If you only would have to wait 1 months to upgrade to a 760, it would be well worth it as the 760 is much faster and will handle resolution all the way up to 1080p pretty well.
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March 6, 2014 9:24:26 AM

woltej1 said:
Well that card has much better cooling and would be worth it.

The 750ti is running on next gen architecture so it will be as future proof as any card at that price range.

If you only would have to wait 1 months to upgrade to a 760, it would be well worth it as the 760 is much faster and will handle resolution all the way up to 1080p pretty well.


So then the 760 is faster/better than even the highest 750ti, even if that 750 has a higher clock? Correct?

If I were to go with getting a 760:
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-video-card-02gp43765k...

Would I have to worry about getting a bigger PSU to support it? I see that it's power requirement is about twice (a little more than) the power needed for the 750ti

I ask because I could stretch my budget to $700, if It meant that I don't have to upgrade my computer again for quite a while.

Thanks again, I hope I'm not being a pest!
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a b 4 Gaming
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March 6, 2014 12:21:00 PM

500W should be enough to power a 760, but you have a thermaltake which aren't the best out there, there are some corsair cx series psus at 600W going for $30-50 if you want to pick one of those up to be safe.
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March 8, 2014 11:31:09 AM

woltej1 said:
500W should be enough to power a 760, but you have a thermaltake which aren't the best out there, there are some corsair cx series psus at 600W going for $30-50 if you want to pick one of those up to be safe.


Thank you very much for the recommendation.

I'll probably go with the 760 then when I get the cash, and upgrade my PSU to a Corsair CX600M. Those seem pretty reliable and all according to reviews.

I have a final question to shoot at you, in reference to which of two GTX760's to get.

This one, by EVGA:
http://www.amazon.com/EVGA-SuperClocked-Dual-Link-Graph...
((I notice some reviews that mention Fan rattling...)

Or this one, by Gigabyte:
http://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-GDDR5-2GB-WINDFORCE-GV-N...

Both overclocked, both with better cooling...both supported by the PSU i'll probably end up getting, and I'm sure both will run all the games I want....

Just didn't know if one company/card had a better reputation...or which would be your choice.

Thanks again!
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a b 4 Gaming
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March 8, 2014 11:35:40 AM

gigabyte is a pretty big name, but evga is known for better quality and better customer service, whenever I go nvidia evga is my first choice and gigabyte is among my last.
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March 8, 2014 12:13:38 PM

woltej1 said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/34PB2/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core Processor ($154.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G43 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($59.99 @ Microcenter)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory ($76.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($66.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Inwin GT1 Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Microcenter)
Total: $588.07





If there is a Micro center located near you then you can save on the Processor / MB by purchasing them there. The AMD FX 8320 is $129.99 there and if you can save $40 off the price of a motherboard purchased at the same time. I saw micro center listed in the build for the motherboard. They will generally drop a little off an SSD and memory that are purchased with a processor as well.
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