Solved

Tried overclocking then saved settings in BIOS now computer won't turn on

Hi Guys,

So the parts that I have for my Computer are: FX4100 Black edition, a gigabyte 990fxa-ud3 motherboard, 8gb ram, 500 gb hdd, and a 6970 gpu, Antec 650W powersupply

I overclocked my Fx4100 to 4.6GHZ and everything was fine. Then I was looking at youtube when system crashed so it went to a blue screen and it was doing the memory dump file thing.

Then I restart it and go into BIOS and drop the voltage of CPU down to 4GHZ. I also changed the North Bridge Voltage to like 4Ghz. I clicked saved and usually the computer boots. However, the fans and LED's turn on but the computer won't boot. It is like in a state of Limbo.

So I tried taking the battery out for 30Mins and reconnecting it and turning it on but it still doesn't work. Then I tried taking out all the computer parts and reconnecting everything and even try booting with one stick of ram but it still doesn't work. So I am not sure what other ideas I can try.

So now when I turn on computer, the computer monitor registers as no signal so theres nothing on screen but the fans and Leds turn on. I checked the motherboard for any burnmarks but there are none. And my power supply did not have any trouble before. And since it turns the fans and leds on, I am sure there is voltage for the computer.

Is there anyway I can reset bios without having to use the software component?
20 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about overclocking saved settings bios computer turn
  1. Welcome to Tom's Hardware Forums!

    It may be just a coincidence that the PSU is defective. Even though the fans come ON it does not mean that the PSU is fine. It may not be able to deliver wattage under load.

    Check the system using a different known good PSU of adequate wattage.
  2. I got it to boot by resetting the CMOS on the motherboard using a screwdriver.

    However, my next problem is that it appears that the system does not detect my hard drive despite the connections being firmly connected.

    It says failed to load disk please put in windows disk and press enter. Then it goes to windows installation and asks if I want to install a new copy of windows. However, I still want to save my old files on the hard drive. Even the BIOS does not detect the hard drive anymore. I also reset my overclock stuff back to default.

    Any way I can bypass this problem and save my files on the computer?
  3. Are the files on a drive different from the OS? Before doing anything try and make a backup. Cloning is a good option. Cloning will create an identical disk; good files, bad files, everything!

    After that connect the drive to a different computer and use "RECUVA" to recover your files. http://www.piriform.com/recuva/download
  4. The files on my hard drive are the same files I had before I screwed up my system files. So it will also be windows 7 home premium. How do I clone my hard disk? Do I just use Recuva to copy the files to the new computer than reconnect the old hard drive back to my computer for the new installation of windows? Thanks for your help so far.
  5. Best answer
    Andrui said:
    The files on my hard drive are the same files I had before I screwed up my system files. So it will also be windows 7 home premium. How do I clone my hard disk? Do I just use Recuva to copy the files to the new computer than reconnect the old hard drive back to my computer for the new installation of windows? Thanks for your help so far.


    For cloning (making an exact copy of the entire disk) you need to connect the hard disk to a different computer and then use a cloning software. There are a few good free cloning software that you can download and run.

    There is Acronis (free download from WD's website)

    Clonezilla: http://clonezilla.org/

    Apricorn (this is what I use): http://www.apricorn.com/products/software/ezgig.html

    EaseUS: http://www.easeus.com/backup-software/ (I have used this) - look for the clone option.

    After you clone the hard disk, use the newly cloned hard disk and run RECUVA on it. This is a safe way to proceed with files recovery.

    After you recover your files make a backup of the new setup.
  6. Check your HD input type in your bios (AHCI or IDE) to make sure they match the HD that you are using. Resetting the bios may have gone to a format windows has not loaded drivers for.
  7. So I bought a SSD and installed the OS onto that. My hard drive cannot be read by my motherboard. When I go to BIOS it only shows the SSD as being the only drive detected. My friend says it may be fried but he could access the files on that hard drive on his computer. Not sure if it is really fried or my computer cannot recognize it.
  8. Andrui said:
    So I bought a SSD and installed the OS onto that. My hard drive cannot be read by my motherboard. When I go to BIOS it only shows the SSD as being the only drive detected. My friend says it may be fried but he could access the files on that hard drive on his computer. Not sure if it is really fried or my computer cannot recognize it.


    Get your friend to recover the files on the hard disk. After that you can try de-bugging. It may be possible that the hard disk has too many bad sectors.
  9. Andrui said:
    My friend says it may be fried but he could access the files on that hard drive on his computer. Not sure if it is really fried or my computer cannot recognize it.

    That is why diagnostics are created. Windows adds significant variables; complicates your problem.

    Either get a disk manufacturer diagnostic from their web site. Or get it from a CD full of diagnostics at ultimatebootdisk.com. Simply boot the computer from their CD-Rom - without complications from Windows. Their diagnostic will say if only hardware is working. And in some cases, why hardware is not working; so that you can learn something.

    Obviously, if a diagnostic reports bad (or incompatible) hardware between drive and motherboard, then Windows would not keep you confused. If hardware checks out OK, then move on to a possible Windows configuration problem. A diagnostic immediately ellminates half the suspects; exponentially reduces confusion.
  10. Thanks for the help Westom, ill try that.
  11. I did the diagnostic for the hdd. And even the disk checker on the ultimatebootcd cannot even detect my hard drive. I guess my old hard drive died.
  12. Andrui said:
    And even the disk checker on the ultimatebootcd cannot even detect my hard drive. I guess my old hard drive died.

    That only said motherboard hardware cannot talk to a computer on the disk drive. Disk drive could be defectivve. Motherboard hardware could have a defect that causes it to not talk to that disk drive. Other possiblities exist. But the diagnostic only says motherboard hardware and disk drive computer do not talk to each other.
  13. I also changed my old gigabyte fxa ud3 motherboard to an asus m5a99fx pro r2.0 motherboard. However, the new motherboard cannot detect the old hard drive as well. Still confused as to what the problem can be. My friends computer can read the hard drive. However, my computer with a changed motherboard can still not read it.
  14. Hi,
    I went through exactly the same scenario as you did. Take notice that some boards take loooooong time to somehow "forget" CMOS settings after you cleared them. Mine (GA-M56S-S3) came back to life after more than 24hrs and I was pretty much sure it was dead forever. What I did was took the battery out after unplugging the rig of course then put the clear CMOS jumper in and left it overnight. Next day I took it out and let the damn thing rest with no battery inside till another day. Only then I put it back together and it worked. I think you can youtube a vid on the subject. It's hard to understand in terms of law of physics but the longer time span worked and shorter not. And I tried like you after 30 min, 1hr 30 min - nothing. Two days worked. Good luck.
  15. kedolf said:
    Hi,
    I went through exactly the same scenario as you did. Take notice that some boards take loooooong time to somehow "forget" CMOS settings after you cleared them. Mine (GA-M56S-S3) came back to life after more than 24hrs and I was pretty much sure it was dead forever. What I did was took the battery out after unplugging the rig of course then put the clear CMOS jumper in and left it overnight. Next day I took it out and let the damn thing rest with no battery inside till another day. Only then I put it back together and it worked. I think you can youtube a vid on the subject. It's hard to understand in terms of law of physics but the longer time span worked and shorter not. And I tried like you after 30 min, 1hr 30 min - nothing. Two days worked. Good luck.


    Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!
  16. @Ubrales

    Hi,
    It's not the first Gigabyte board that died on me and then came back to life following the above procedure. In a sense I deserved it for all that bad touching them if you will but they never gave up. And since the first occurrence of this miraculous resurrection I'm a Gigabyte guy for life. As I mentioned before there's a vid on YT describing the whole procedure, unfortunately the guy doesn't explain how it is possible from electromechanical interdependencies' point of view. Well the circuitry is governed by physics but so we knew long time ago there was a ghost in the machine...
  17. kedolf said:
    @Ubrales

    Hi,
    It's not the first Gigabyte board that died on me and then came back to life following the above procedure. In a sense I deserved it for all that bad touching them if you will but they never gave up. And since the first occurrence of this miraculous resurrection I'm a Gigabyte guy for life. As I mentioned before there's a vid on YT describing the whole procedure, unfortunately the guy doesn't explain how it is possible from electromechanical interdependencies' point of view. Well the circuitry is governed by physics but so we knew long time ago there was a ghost in the machine...

    Thank you! There are always some strange tricks (hard to explain) that do work! - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ukMId5fIi0

    I will definitely keep your suggestion in mind as one of the options to try while de-bugging.
  18. Andrui said:
    I also changed my old gigabyte fxa ud3 motherboard to an asus m5a99fx pro r2.0 motherboard. However, the new motherboard cannot detect the old hard drive as well.

    Did you consider all variables? For example, did you also change data cable? Did you change how disk is powered? That drive might not properly connect to your cable but make a good connection with a friend's cable.

    Computer voltage could be defective. Good enough for motherboards to work but insufficient for a drive interface. Plenty of items (beyond drive and motherboard) are in that suspect list. Manufacturer diagnostic eliminated one that often creates confusion - the OS.

    Was any jumper correct since a setting for working in your friends system can also be defective with your cable. Another of many variables.
  19. No I did not change how disk is powered since it was fine before my overclocking. I used the old sata cable and it did not detect it so I tried using the new sata cable that comes with the new motherboard. And it still did not work. I do not think the computer voltage is defective since my other SSD is running fine and the graphics CPU and ram are all running normally. I am not sure what a jumper is. He did not use my cable to connect to his computer he just used his own sata cable.
  20. Andrui said:
    I do not think the computer voltage is defective since my other SSD is running fine and the graphics CPU and ram are all running normally.
    That was an important point. Good means a voltage above B. Bad means a voltage below A. Between B and A is a voltage where many things work and a few things do not. Many assume a binary world - that A and B are same. The world is ternary; a third state always exists between B and A. Explains why a completely defective supply can still boot and run a computer for months. And why some get confused by 'strange' or 'intermittent' errors.

    Even a connector can be perfectly fine until it is disconnected and reconnected. More suspects exist than assumed.

    A meter is needed to know voltages are fine. An example of why you should not say, "xxx tests OK because yyy works". Knowing something is good or bad means maybe establishing a good system (ie your buddy's system). Then swap parts only one at a time until something fails. It might not find the defect since some defects only cause failures when two devices are used together.

    Or swap your buddy's parts into your machine until the diagnostic says motherboard now talks to disk. Just some suggestions necessary to identify part(s) that causes a failure.

    That's what I do since I never leave something until I also know why. The alternative (as another has suggested) is to recover all data using your buddy's system. And buy a new drive. Most people use that method rather than learn what in their diagnostic procedure was flawed.

    One new concept applies here. The world is ternary. Not binary, as assumed, to declare a good power 'system' (which is more than a PSU). Yeah, it sometimes can be tedious.
Ask a new question

Read More

Overclocking BIOS Computers