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WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR When CPU is at 100% Windows 8.1

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March 7, 2014 3:10:37 PM

Hey guys,
So recently I've got my old HP Pavilion dv6-1280us to work again and I'm running into a problem. Whenever I have the CPU set at Max Processor State at 100% It shoots up to max frequency (2.4Ghz) causing the CPU to heat up like a mofo at ~80-90°C. Then whenever the CPU is at 2.4 and is fully loaded, i.e. 100% on Task Manager, it crashes into the WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR. Any help on what causes this? I've got a pretty good idea with computers so if things come to where I have to get in this thing (Not the first time) I can do it. Thanks!
a b à CPUs
March 8, 2014 4:34:37 PM

I would try to clean the inside and replace the thermal compound to address the heat issue. WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR indicates a hardware problem.
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March 8, 2014 4:44:13 PM

rehed21 said:
Why wasn't it working before? What did you have to do to get it working?

Clean and replace the heatsink thermal compound to try to bring down the temperatures and make sure the fans are clean and spinning. My guess is that your power supply is also old and not able to supply the necessary power, but it could also be bad capacitors on the motherboard.


It wasn't working because I opened it up and cleaned out the fan (5 years is definitely overdue) and when I pu it back together I put the ribbon connecting the power to the mobo in backwards (Rookie mistake but it was 2:30 in the morning afterall). So if it is a problem with some capacitors or the power supply, how could I check to be sure and is there anything I could do to fix it?
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a b à CPUs
March 8, 2014 5:12:31 PM

When I initially answered I did not realize that it was a laptop (which I'm not familiar with), sorry. In a desktop you can look at the capacitors to see if they are bulging or leaking and a chip can also be fried which you can see by looking for burn marks, but you would usually smell that when it happens. The laptop's power supply is the battery, so it is different from a desktop, so that should not be the problem, unless you fried it when you put the ribbon connector on backwards.

If it were me I would open it up and take a look for anything obviously wrong. You could throw money and time at it but it would probably not be worth it. I think you can clean and replace the thermal compound which should help with temperatures. Try reducing the maximum processor usage to 80% or lower to see if that prevents crashing.
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March 9, 2014 10:15:30 AM

rehed21 said:
When I initially answered I did not realize that it was a laptop (which I'm not familiar with), sorry. In a desktop you can look at the capacitors to see if they are bulging or leaking and a chip can also be fried which you can see by looking for burn marks, but you would usually smell that when it happens. The laptop's power supply is the battery, so it is different from a desktop, so that should not be the problem, unless you fried it when you put the ribbon connector on backwards.

If it were me I would open it up and take a look for anything obviously wrong. You could throw money and time at it but it would probably not be worth it. I think you can clean and replace the thermal compound which should help with temperatures. Try reducing the maximum processor usage to 80% or lower to see if that prevents crashing.

So I've opened it up and nothing appears to directly be damaged I'm going to attach a picture of the board just to be sure. Haven't applied any thermal paste yet so everything in the pictures are as is
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