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First-time build- $600 budget (OS included)

Approximate Purchase Date: ASAP

Budget Range: trying not to go too much over $600 after taxes (OS needs to be included in that budget)

System Usage from Most to Least Important: surfing the internet, gaming, videos, music, editing. (not a hardcore gamer, but definitely enjoy playing games)

Are you buying a monitor: eventually, but I currently have one that should do the job until then. I also have a mouse and keyboard, but a new keyboard would be nice, as a couple of my keys tend to not work some times.

Parts to Upgrade: everything

Do you need to buy OS: Yes
Please note that if you're using an OEM license of Windows, you will need a new one when buying a new motherboard.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: whoever has the best deal really (would be nice if most parts came from the same place to make it easier, or if it means less shipping, etc. ?

Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Parts Preferences: no preference really

Overclocking: don't know too much about that, should I?

SLI or Crossfire: Again, not really sure

Your Monitor Resolution: 1280x1024

Additional Comments: something not too noisy is preferred.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: My current pc is nothing special, and I want a new one from scratch, instead of trying to upgrade a Dell Optiplex GX620 that makes an awful buzzing noise occasionally. I may eventually try to fix it and use as a 2nd pc, but that's irrelevant.

I should note that I have already received a build recommendation, and while I think it looks okay, there's been a lot of going back and forth over the video card, etc... and I figured why not see what someone else recommends and go from there to try and make a decision. I would like to post the recommended build and explain a few things as to why I was getting confused/hesitant about rolling with the original build, and the few revised builds.
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about time build 600 budget included
  1. Best answer
    This will actually do really well at that resolution for gaming, and still do ok at higher resolutions when you upgrade. Went Intel for the i3 for normal computing tasks, as it has better single thread performance, and is plenty for what you're going to be doing.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i3-4130 3.4GHz Dual-Core Processor ($118.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B85M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: GeIL EVO POTENZA 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R7 260X 2GB Video Card ($134.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Xion XON-560 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $596.90
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-07 21:04 EST-0500)
  2. it is AMD six cores alternative build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Rosewill Challenger-U3 ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $602.92
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-07 21:13 EST-0500)
  3. This was the first recommended build:

    CPU: Intel Core i3-4130 3.4GHz Dual-Core Processor ($118.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($20.62 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B85M-HD3 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($60.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: GeIL EVO POTENZA 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon R7 260X 2GB Video Card ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Zalman ZM-T1 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($27.99 @ Mwave)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 430W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $596.50

    Then, someone recommended getting rid of the cooler, going with a cheaper motherboard and getting a better cpu/gpu and this is what the revised build looked like: (cheaper motherboard, better cpu, better gpu, and no cooler)

    CPU: Intel Core i3-4330 3.5GHz Dual-Core Processor ($133.97 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($42.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: GeIL EVO POTENZA 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.94 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card ($149.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Zalman ZM-T1 MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($27.99 @ Mwave)
    Power Supply: Corsair CX 430W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $614.83 (was a tad cheaper when first recommended)

    But then, I just had to do more research and get more advice of course lol, and I was told I could go for a GTX 660 instead of the 750ti for the same price, and get cheaper RAM (maybe like $1 less), but then was told by someone who I had already been talking to that if I go with the GTX 660, I would have to upgrade the PSU to at least 500w. I'm so confused...haha! I mean, I am understanding some of it, I am just so indecisive about what to go with to best suit my needs and still staying under budget, or at least real close to the $600 budget.

    Now, it should be noted that I was very happy and grateful with all of these suggestions and greatly appreciated the help, I just kinda got a little lost at some point and thought I would either start over or see what you all think of the recommended builds and the changes that were made and which, if any, I should go with.
  4. AMD Radeon said:
    it is AMD six cores alternative build

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus M5A97 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: Kingston Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Rosewill Challenger-U3 ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $602.92
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-07 21:13 EST-0500)


    Thanks for replying, I appreciate it. Wouldn't a 2GB video card be better? And wondering what the advantages are to getting the motherboard you listed for almost $90, as opposed to maybe a similar cheaper one to leave more money for a better video card or something? I'm new to all this, so I'm just trying to get a better understanding of it all.
  5. ^ it is a sad fact, although amd cpus are cheap, you have to spend a lot for mobo. AMD's cheap mobo usually dont last long.
    1GB or 2GB doesnt make any different in a low end GPU
  6. If you're not OCing too much, a M5A97 LE R2.0 should be fine.

    The other thing I'd consider is to get a 760K and a better GPU, possibly.
  7. Well, of course, just my luck; the 750 ti went up in price (not by an insane amount, but still)!!
  8. Even though I didn't end up going with that particular build, I chose it as the solution anyway, because that, along with other info on another thread from the same user certainly contributed in my decision-making and helped me out. Thanks again.
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