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Help with building my first PC $1500-$2000 Budget

Hello everyone, I am planning on purchasing parts to build my first computer in the next few days. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated. Here is my proposed system http://pcpartpicker.com/p/37hPN

Budget Range: $1500-$2000
System usage: Gaming, internet, videos
Your Monitor Resolution: 1920 x 1080
Overclocking: Yes, but down the road when I decide to buy an upgraded cooling system
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg
Games I want to be able to play : Skyrim, fallout, battlefield 4
OS: Windows 7 on the ssd
Additional Comments: I am torn between buying the Asus Z87-PRO ATX LGA1150 MoBo and the ASUS SABERTOOTH Z87 LGA 1150 so thoughts on noth are helpful
Please note: I already have an optical drive and an HDD and a copy of windows 7

Being that this is the first system I have ever built if you see any glaring errors please take it easy on me. Again any and all help is greatly appreciated.
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building 1500 2000 budget
  1. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Microcenter)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($89.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Best Buy)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 650D ATX Mid Tower Case ($139.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Antec HCG M 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1324.93
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-10 03:54 EDT-0400)

    feel free to raise that 780 to a 780ti. if you've got no plans to get an SLI your GPU, a good 650W PSU from tier 2 of this list will do: http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx . if you plan to SLI 2x780ti's, then an 850W PSU makes a bit of sense.

    heck, considering your budget, may as well get a third party CPU cooler now than later.
  2. Best answer
    Changed a bit

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-PRO ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($179.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.02 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Best Buy)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Corsair 650D ATX Mid Tower Case ($139.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($134.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1464.93
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-10 03:56 EDT-0400)
  3. Ok so I took both Hazle and Ahmadjons advice and swapped my ssd. I also changed my PSU based on the tier list that Hazle provided and I went with the better video card like Hazle suggested. Here is my updated build http://pcpartpicker.com/p/37iVO. The only thing I am still on the fence about is the mobo. I am leaning towards the ASUS SABERTOOTH Z87 LGA 1150 just because it comes with a 5 year warranty. Any thoughts on the motherboard guys? Thank you for your help so far, I am getting close to pulling the trigger on this bad boy
  4. i wouldn't spend all that much on a Sabertooth, not if you just want something that simply works with a mild OC of the CPU. many people have gone with less and not experienced a problem that would warrant spending so much on warranty alone. it'd be one thing though if you had a bit more budget and have no idea where else to spend it on, or do genuinely want the the OCing features. but seeing as the latter isn't all that major a factor to you, you can do less, just as a majority of others had.

    based on PCpp's PSU calculator, 750W is plenty for 2x780ti's if that's what you're planning for (otherwise, again, 650W is really more than enough with a single 780ti), though unless you're turning this PC on 24/7 for weeks on end and you wanna save up on electricity bills, you may appreciate the money you'd save up now with a 80+ Bronze rated PSU for $75-100, than the long term costs you save with a ~$170 80+ Platinum.
  5. Here is a Nice build :

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VI FORMULA ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($295.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($92.04 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($499.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: NZXT H440 (Red/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
    Power Supply: Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1812.96
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-10 21:49 EDT-0400)
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