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Accurate CPU Temp?

Hello, just recently I've gotten into overclocking but my major concern is what Cpu temperature monitoring system is best/most accurate. I'm using RealTemp & it tells me I'm at 72C(hottest) core. Yet on your my OC Panel (im using an asus maximus vi Extreme) it tells me I'm at 58C.. This is a huge concern for me because if I'm at 57 I have some head room to bump up some more and overclock, yet if it's the opposite and I'm at 68 than that's as far as I can push it safely without being too toasty.
Current system:
CPU: i7-4770k
Motherboard : Maximus VI Extreme
Ram: 16GB G.skill ripjaws x
Kraken x60 280mm water cooler with rosewill hiperboa 140mm x2 fans
26 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about accurate cpu temp
  1. Try using HWMonitor.
  2. intels run hot. Max temp for that cpu is 105 celcius. you have nothing to worry about. i have a 3770k overclocked to 4.6 on liquid cooling. it hits 87 max and ive been running it like that for almost 2 years and it hasnt skipped a beat ever. i trust realtemp, the asus software seems not to refresh very quickly and doesnt seem very accurate for me.
  3. BradleyJames said:
    intels run hot. Max temp for that cpu is 105 celcius. you have nothing to worry about. i have a 3770k overclocked to 4.6 on liquid cooling. it hits 87 max and ive been running it like that for almost 2 years and it hasnt skipped a beat ever. i trust realtemp, the asus software seems not to refresh very quickly and doesnt seem very accurate for me.


    Awesome, thanks!
  4. No, do NOT let it get that high. Disregard him, seriously, do not let it get that high. Nowhere has anybody with any credibility said it's fine to go up to 105c. As for you, Bradley, work on your cooling, that's too high.
  5. sorry but i disagrree, with stock cooling they get to mid 80s to 90. if they werent made to run like that, they would include a better cooling solution. there is nothing wrong with those temps
  6. That's called bad airflow. Intel has said the max temps are 62c. Just because you applied thermal paste wrong and had bad wire management does not mean they're designed to run with that.
  7. i should clarify, im hitting mid 80s on stress tests such as prime 95 or intelburntest. normal gaming or video converting is mid to high 60s
  8. get your facts right buddy, sandy bridge has a lower max temp, ivy and haswell are higher. google it before wrongly call ing someone out. and i have a 600t with 9 fans and beautiful wire management. im done arguing with idiots\
  9. Oh, you're calling me an idiot? Okay, I'm trying to help him and not giving him misinformation. Please give me one source stating 105c is the max temp.
  10. Would 85C be about right then? (@ 4.7GHz). Or anything below 90 to be more specific
  11. Pretty much anybody will tell you 80c is the absolute max you want it at. I say 75, a lot will say 65-70.
  12. ewok93 said:
    Pretty much anybody will tell you 80c is the absolute max you want it at. I say 75, a lot will say 65-70.


    Ah ok. If I'm hitting 85C with Prime is it safe to leave it at the 4.7GHz as it will rarely reach that high unless its a benchmark in that case then?
  13. I would reduce it a bit, maybe .1ghz.
  14. ewok93 said:
    I would reduce it a bit.


    Ok, no problem, thanks!
  15. Happy to help.
  16. What do you mean by max temp. I have seen TJMaxs which means the temp by which the CPU begins to shut down but never seen a specific max temp. Even if it is a TJMax the rule of thumb is usually 20 degrees less than the CPUs TJMax which would put the desired 100% load temps in the 80s. So I am wandering what is meant by max tamp.
  17. TJMaxs its basically when it's going to shut down or be damaged permanently. You do not want it to hit that. 80c is really the absolute max you want on Prime95, as after a long night of gaming or rendering or something, it's going to hit and stay at that max temp, or near it. At ~80c it's going to reduce the lifetime of the CPU.
  18. first you say 62, then when i challenge it you all of a sudden say 85. thats what i said in the beginning, MINE RUNS AT 86. you looked it up and changed it. thats what ive been saying the whole damn time, his temps are fine at 72. cpu authority, ya right. if you were you would have given the right info in the beginning, like i did. scroll up and look at the posts
  19. The problem is max temps verys from CPU to CPU. You can make generalization based on spec sheets for that generation of CPU but even they can be off because no 2 CPUs are alike. If you were to look up a specific TJMax for your CPU you will not find it mainly because Intel does not list TJMax temps rather they list a Max TDP in which the TJMax is calculated off of based on properties of the CPU. The TJMax is programmed into the CPU which most temperature sensors will access to give your distance to the TJMax.

    That being said it is very hard to give an exact temperature at which you should run your CPU. Technically you should not run it above the defaults because it will cause silicon degradation or settling as some people call it. We all have our own rules of thumb like mine is to keep my temps 20 degrees under the TJMax were others might use a 30 degree or 40 degree. It is in the end up to you as to how close you want to get to the TJMax.

    As for your TJMax I have read for Generation 4 chips it is between 100 and 105 degrees C and I think that is what some of the posters were referring to.
  20. Demorthus said:
    ewok93 said:
    Pretty much anybody will tell you 80c is the absolute max you want it at. I say 75, a lot will say 65-70.


    Ah ok. If I'm hitting 85C with Prime is it safe to leave it at the 4.7GHz as it will rarely reach that high unless its a benchmark in that case then?


    yes 85 if fine, thats what mine runs at for 2 years. Take it from someone who is actually running an intel cpu, not a bottom of the barrel fx 4100. he shouldnt have gotten best solution, he just repeated what i said in previous posts, and gave false info about max temp being 63
  21. Haha, you're judging my intelligence off of my current CPU? No. I actually go around this forum helping people, hence the CPUs authority badge. I do not like having to say that, but you are giving somebody misinformation, and that's not alright. I'm sorry I offended you or something, but that information is way wrong. Just because you can do it doesn't mean everybody should do it. There have been people who have jumped out of planes and their parachutes have deployed, and they landed in a bush and sustained minor bruising. This does not mean EVERYBODY can jump out of a plane without a parachute and be fine. Sure, you can be, you can survive, maybe. But you might not. Do you really want to risk an expensive CPU over .1ghz? Do you really, really trust this guy with zero credentials? Because if you do, fine, run it at 85c. It probably won't die because of it, but it will not last as long, and it is just too high to be considered safe.

    Sorry OP, but please do not listen to this guy. Experience does not mean everything. Just because I may have a 4100 does not mean I have not worked on Intels almost exactly like yours. I have, I have overclocked them, and they're doing fine today after 2 years. So, you can listen to somebody who has experience with one, or somebody who has experience with three. You can listen to somebody who has helped solve a lot of problems here, or somebody who hasn't solved 5. Again, I do not like pulling the badge thing, but this guy is giving you misinformation, and I'd rather you listen to me than him, because if you listen to him, your CPU will not be at a safe level.
  22. ewok93 said:
    Haha, you're judging my intelligence off of my current CPU? No. I actually go around this forum helping people, hence the CPUs authority badge. I do not like having to say that, but you are giving somebody misinformation, and that's not alright. I'm sorry I offended you or something, but that information is way wrong. Just because you can do it doesn't mean everybody should do it. There have been people who have jumped out of planes and their parachutes have deployed, and they landed in a bush and sustained minor bruising. This does not mean EVERYBODY can jump out of a plane without a parachute and be fine. Sure, you can be, you can survive, maybe. But you might not. Do you really want to risk an expensive CPU over .1ghz? Do you really, really trust this guy with zero credentials? Because if you do, fine, run it at 85c. It probably won't die because of it, but it will not last as long, and it is just too high to be considered safe.

    Sorry OP, but please do not listen to this guy. Experience does not mean everything. Just because I may have a 4100 does not mean I have not worked on Intels almost exactly like yours. I have, I have overclocked them, and they're doing fine today after 2 years. So, you can listen to somebody who has experience with one, or somebody who has experience with three. You can listen to somebody who has helped solve a lot of problems here, or somebody who hasn't solved 5. Again, I do not like pulling the badge thing, but this guy is giving you misinformation, and I'd rather you listen to me than him, because if you listen to him, your CPU will not be at a safe level.


    I dropped it down to 4.5ghz and it's running pretty nicely at 55-65 now
  23. ewok93 said:
    Haha, you're judging my intelligence off of my current CPU? No. I actually go around this forum helping people, hence the CPUs authority badge. I do not like having to say that, but you are giving somebody misinformation, and that's not alright. I'm sorry I offended you or something, but that information is way wrong. Just because you can do it doesn't mean everybody should do it. There have been people who have jumped out of planes and their parachutes have deployed, and they landed in a bush and sustained minor bruising. This does not mean EVERYBODY can jump out of a plane without a parachute and be fine. Sure, you can be, you can survive, maybe. But you might not. Do you really want to risk an expensive CPU over .1ghz? Do you really, really trust this guy with zero credentials? Because if you do, fine, run it at 85c. It probably won't die because of it, but it will not last as long, and it is just too high to be considered safe.

    Sorry OP, but please do not listen to this guy. Experience does not mean everything. Just because I may have a 4100 does not mean I have not worked on Intels almost exactly like yours. I have, I have overclocked them, and they're doing fine today after 2 years. So, you can listen to somebody who has experience with one, or somebody who has experience with three. You can listen to somebody who has helped solve a lot of problems here, or somebody who hasn't solved 5. Again, I do not like pulling the badge thing, but this guy is giving you misinformation, and I'd rather you listen to me than him, because if you listen to him, your CPU will not be at a safe level.


    I dropped it down to 4.5ghz and it's running pretty nicely at 55-65 now
  24. Best answer
    All of you need to chill out and relax.

    @OP:

    There are often two separate thermal measurement reference points on most motherboards. Enthusiast motherboards often have more.

    The first reference point called the Thermal Junction, often abbreviated TJ. This is the temperature at the surface of the CPU die as it mates with the metal heat spreader (which is itself connected to the heatsink). This value is not measured directly, rather it is computed from a calibrated value set at the factory using a thermocouple, and a digital thermal sensor located on each core and below the main die. The value of the thermal sensor is subtracted from the calibrated value to yield an index value. The index value is then put through a lookup table stored in the system firmware to yield a corresponding temperature. The lookup tables may change with major and minor CPU revisions, so firmware updates are often needed to fix what may appear to be a wonky sensor value, such as an idle temperature that is below ambient.

    The second reference point is a thermometer that is installed by the motherboard manufacturer. This thermometer is often located inside the CPU socket or very near to it. These devices are much larger than the digital thermal sensors located within the CPU, and are much more accurate as a result. However, they are farther away from the heat generating components, and as a result will always be cooler than the temperature measured at the thermal junction. This value should be pretty close to TCase, which is the temperature measured at the top of the integrated heat spreader.

    CPU throttling and thermal protection is always performed relative to the TJ. TJMax is the temperature at which the CPU will enter a throttle state in order to bring temperature back under control. If TJMax is exceeded too far (such as may occur in the event of a failed cooling apparatus), the CPU will power down completely to prevent damage. Damage will not be incurred by hitting TJMax periodically, but the lifespan of the CPU will be reduced if it is chronically close to TJMax over a long period of time. It may reduce it from 10 years to 7 years for example; most people will replace theirs long before it dies from heat.

    The TJMax for Intel CPUs is around 90 degrees centigrade.

    The formula for this is simple: under a constant electric force, electromigration occurs at a rate proportional to temperature. Part of the semiconductor manufacturing process involves baking the IC at hundreds of degrees (over 600 degrees centigrade) for hours on end in order to activate dopants that have been implanted in the substrate. Semiconductors can take the heat, but the metallic interconnects that join the transistors together will decay at a greater rate when an electric force is applied at high temperatures. Eventually they will decay to the point where the supply voltage needs to be increased in order to maintain stability, and eventually they will fail completely.

    Maintaining load temperatures near TJMax may also cause undue stress on the surrounding components that are not quite as heat tolerant. Thermally induced stresses can damage a poorly manufactured PCB as well as change the characteristics of certain electrical components such as electrolytic capacitors which are used to provide steady voltage to the CPU.

    So, running a CPU at high temperature is fine as long as one is aware of the consequences and has equipment that is suitable for doing so. Both AMD and NVidia have designed their most recent families of GPUs to run at 95 degrees and 80 degrees respectively; this necessitated making adjustments to the design of the PCB and cooling apparatus to accommodate. These temperature values are used as performance targets, not upper bounds.

    Now, behave!
  25. Thanks.
  26. Pinhedd said:
    All of you need to chill out and relax.

    @OP:

    There are often two separate thermal measurement reference points on most motherboards. Enthusiast motherboards often have more.

    The first reference point called the Thermal Junction, often abbreviated TJ. This is the temperature at the surface of the CPU die as it mates with the metal heat spreader (which is itself connected to the heatsink). This value is not measured directly, rather it is computed from a calibrated value set at the factory using a thermocouple, and a digital thermal sensor located on each core and below the main die. The value of the thermal sensor is subtracted from the calibrated value to yield an index value. The index value is then put through a lookup table stored in the system firmware to yield a corresponding temperature. The lookup tables may change with major and minor CPU revisions, so firmware updates are often needed to fix what may appear to be a wonky sensor value, such as an idle temperature that is below ambient.

    The second reference point is a thermometer that is installed by the motherboard manufacturer. This thermometer is often located inside the CPU socket or very near to it. These devices are much larger than the digital thermal sensors located within the CPU, and are much more accurate as a result. However, they are farther away from the heat generating components, and as a result will always be cooler than the temperature measured at the thermal junction. This value should be pretty close to TCase, which is the temperature measured at the top of the integrated heat spreader.

    CPU throttling and thermal protection is always performed relative to the TJ. TJMax is the temperature at which the CPU will enter a throttle state in order to bring temperature back under control. If TJMax is exceeded too far (such as may occur in the event of a failed cooling apparatus), the CPU will power down completely to prevent damage. Damage will not be incurred by hitting TJMax periodically, but the lifespan of the CPU will be reduced if it is chronically close to TJMax over a long period of time. It may reduce it from 10 years to 7 years for example; most people will replace theirs long before it dies from heat.

    The TJMax for Intel CPUs is around 90 degrees centigrade.

    The formula for this is simple: under a constant electric force, electromigration occurs at a rate proportional to temperature. Part of the semiconductor manufacturing process involves baking the IC at hundreds of degrees (over 600 degrees centigrade) for hours on end in order to activate dopants that have been implanted in the substrate. Semiconductors can take the heat, but the metallic interconnects that join the transistors together will decay at a greater rate when an electric force is applied at high temperatures. Eventually they will decay to the point where the supply voltage needs to be increased in order to maintain stability, and eventually they will fail completely.

    Maintaining load temperatures near TJMax may also cause undue stress on the surrounding components that are not quite as heat tolerant. Thermally induced stresses can damage a poorly manufactured PCB as well as change the characteristics of certain electrical components such as electrolytic capacitors which are used to provide steady voltage to the CPU.

    So, running a CPU at high temperature is fine as long as one is aware of the consequences and has equipment that is suitable for doing so. Both AMD and NVidia have designed their most recent families of GPUs to run at 95 degrees and 80 degrees respectively; this necessitated making adjustments to the design of the PCB and cooling apparatus to accommodate. These temperature values are used as performance targets, not upper bounds.

    Now, behave!


    Beautiful! :')
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