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Replaced P.S. now things run hotter. Advice on Intel heatsink too please.

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March 10, 2014 6:16:53 PM

Hello tom's Hardware friends:

I had some troubles with my Intel D945GTP desktop randomly rebooting, and finally traced it down to a power supply. (Some detailed specs below.)

I purchased a Antec True Power Trio TP3-550 550W supply (up from 400W) and it now seems reliable.

However, I note the CPU fan now runs faster more, and also the hard drives seem to be giving trouble with excessive heat.

I am assuming the 12V is a little higher, so there is more heat loss. Maybe it is OK now and it was low before which is why I had issues. I measured 12.04V on some of the hard drive wires, but can't directly measure the one that goes to the CPU (Trio means there are three 12V regulators.)

I seem to be resorting to finding methods to keeping things cool like a better CPU heat sink. Also, I am toying with the idea of making some brackets to separate the hard drives from each other. They are mounted very close to each other, and I fear that is limiting the airflow.

There is very little data on any of the heat sinks I have seen in terms of heat dissipation or number of CPU watts they can carry.

My current heat sink is from Intel, it looks like this one at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Intel-CPU-Heatsink-3-5-D34017-001...

I have no idea if it is good or bad, it does have a copper core...

Can someone help me with a replacement model? I think my processor can dissipate up to 110W (that is a bunch.)

Am I heading down the wrong path with bigger heat sinks, or should I be looking into a way of adjusting the supply voltages?

Some details:
Intel Pentium 4 dual core 3.0GHz 800MHz FSB
4GB ddr2 memory (XP only allows 3.5GB to be used.)
Intel D945GTP motherboard.
3ea. 250GB SATA drives,
(2ea. Seagate ST3250824AS 250GB, and
1ea. WD2500AAJS 250GB.)
NVIDIA GeForce 6600 GT PCI Express display adapter (with 2 monitors attached.)
SEDNA - PCI Express USB 3.0
Creative SB Live! PCI card (for some reason the on board sound quit years ago.)

WinXP SP3.

Any help will be greatly appreciated,

Thanks, Mark.

Update, I install a program called 'SpeedFan' I don't like it a lot, but... Anyway, it reports 12V bouncing between 12.06V to 12.19V Is that a lot?


a b à CPUs
March 10, 2014 6:40:05 PM

You power supply is fine. When you installed it did you plug everything in correctly? Also if your PSU is mounted top with fan facing down it could be putting heat into the case... Bigger heatsinks is tje way to go.. I recommend a hyper 212 evo if it will fit your case
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March 10, 2014 6:54:39 PM

Thanks, Shain:

I did verify all connections, (It's pretty hard to screw them up these days what with all the different shape connectors.)

It is an ATX P.S. and can only be mounted one way, fan down at the top of the case. The fan blows air out the back. It does, however change it's speed depending on internal box temperature, (the first P.S. I have seen do that, kinda nice for noise control.)

There is also another fan mounted to the back of the case.

Looking into the H.S. you mention.

Thanks.
Mark.
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March 12, 2014 3:14:52 PM

Well, I had an epiphany last night.

I noticed the temperature of my processor never got above 90C, and when it was that hot, my system seemed to slow way down. I realized the CPU was probably throttling and 90C was the throttle point.

I also noticed the idle temp would be about 60C and under load it would JUMP to 90C. I mean on the order of 2 or 3 seconds.

The epiphany was, I realized the mass of the heat sink should not let the temp change that fast. Even without any fan at all, the thermal mass should limit the change in temp of 30C to more like 8-15 seconds.

I decided to check on the thermal past under the heat sink (I had purchased this computer from a store, and never check this.)

Much to my amazement, I found TOO MUCH thermal paste. Not enough to make a mess, but still, way too thick.

Thermal paste is not a great thermal conductor. It is 100 to 1000 times better then air, and absolutely necessary for the proper functioning of a heat sink, but if applied thick enough will actually become a thermal insulator.

I cleaned it off, applied the proper amount (barely enough to make the heat sink white) and much to my amazement, all works well now.

SpeedFan never shows more then 61C, and my machine seems to be running at full speed all the time.

I am so happy.

I will mark this as solved.

Mark.
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a b à CPUs
March 12, 2014 3:17:12 PM

Cool Javelin said:
Well, I had an epiphany last night.

I noticed the temperature of my processor never got above 90C, and when it was that hot, my system seemed to slow way down. I realized the CPU was probably throttling and 90C was the throttle point.

I also noticed the idle temp would be about 60C and under load it would JUMP to 90C. I mean on the order of 2 or 3 seconds.

The epiphany was, I realized the mass of the heat sink should not let the temp change that fast. Even without any fan at all, the thermal mass should limit the change in temp of 30C to more like 8-15 seconds.

I decided to check on the thermal past under the heat sink (I had purchased this computer from a store, and never check this.)

Much to my amazement, I found TOO MUCH thermal paste. Not enough to make a mess, but still, way too thick.

Thermal paste is not a great thermal conductor. It is 100 to 1000 times better then air, and absolutely necessary for the proper functioning of a heat sink, but if applied thick enough will actually become a thermal insulator.

I cleaned it off, applied the proper amount (enough to make the heat sink white, but almost see through.) and Volarie, all works well now.

SpeedFan never shows more then 61C, and my machine seems to be running at full speed all the time.

I am so happy.

I will mark this as solved.

Mark.


Awesome! I'm so happy for you :D 
Is it okay if you could select one of my answers as the solution? like this one maybe? please :) 
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