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intel(R) Pentium(R) D dual core 3.00ghz cpu with gtx 750 ti

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March 11, 2014 12:05:44 AM

I'm thinking of putting a gtx 750 ti in my current pc. Would my CPU matter on graphic preforming. It has a Duel core intel pentium D 3.00 ghz CPU. I will also be using the 750 ti for a future AMD Fx 8350 build when i get the money(couple years or soo). will i be able to put to put the 750 in the amd build.



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March 11, 2014 12:17:27 AM

GPU's compatibility is determined by the motherboard, same thing goes to CPU. In addition, GPU's compatibility is also determined by the PC case, whether it allows full-height or half-height cards. With that said, almost all motherboard are compatible with every GPU as PCI-E lanes are backward compatible. The only thing I would check now is the PC case, but that would require you to provide the case model with the specific GPU in mind.

Other than what I've said above, you're probably worried about bottleneck too. Some benchmarks have shown that even an Athlon X4 750K (the lowest CPU recommendation for gaming build) won't be a bottleneck to the GPU, but keep in mind that it is still a lot stronger than your Pentium Dual Core 3 Ghz. Therefore, I would conclude that your CPU will matter on graphic performance and will most likely lower the expected performance of a GTX 750 Ti.

There are 3 options now,
1. Leave it like that and use what your CPU can do while limiting the performance of the GTX 750 Ti.
2. Downgrade the GTX 750 Ti to something like HD 7770, R7 250X, or even R7 240.
3. Upgrade the CPU/MB to Athlon X4 750K and a board with total being around $130 for just the CPU/MB, which still need a GPU.
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March 11, 2014 1:34:39 AM

I can tell you right now that the Pentium Ds are extremely slow and innefficient. I have an old Pentium D Extreme edition which is a pentium D with hyperthreading and I have that running at 4.2GHz. Even at such high clock speeds, it's utterly useless in games. It even bottlenecks a GT520 that it's paired with. A GT520. Let that sink in. I would buy a new motherboard and CPU first. However I wouldn't get a x4 750k as that's already slacking behind. Get a FX6300 or FX8320 and overclock it. Don't spend 50$ on higher clock speeds that can be easily achieved within 10 minutes. Instead, put that 50$ towards a better GPU, like a GTX 660. It will be far better than a 8350 and 750ti. Also, you can SLi two 660s together to achieve between GTX 770 and GTX 780 performance.
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March 11, 2014 1:54:39 AM

IDontUnderstand said:
GPU's compatibility is determined by the motherboard, same thing goes to CPU. In addition, GPU's compatibility is also determined by the PC case, whether it allows full-height or half-height cards. With that said, almost all motherboard are compatible with every GPU as PCI-E lanes are backward compatible. The only thing I would check now is the PC case, but that would require you to provide the case model with the specific GPU in mind.

Other than what I've said above, you're probably worried about bottleneck too. Some benchmarks have shown that even an Athlon X4 750K (the lowest CPU recommendation for gaming build) won't be a bottleneck to the GPU, but keep in mind that it is still a lot stronger than your Pentium Dual Core 3 Ghz. Therefore, I would conclude that your CPU will matter on graphic performance and will most likely lower the expected performance of a GTX 750 Ti.

There are 3 options now,
1. Leave it like that and use what your CPU can do while limiting the performance of the GTX 750 Ti.
2. Downgrade the GTX 750 Ti to something like HD 7770, R7 250X, or even R7 240.
3. Upgrade the CPU/MB to Athlon X4 750K and a board with total being around $130 for just the CPU/MB, which still need a GPU.


marshal11 said:
I can tell you right now that the Pentium Ds are extremely slow and innefficient. I have an old Pentium D Extreme edition which is a pentium D with hyperthreading and I have that running at 4.2GHz. Even at such high clock speeds, it's utterly useless in games. It even bottlenecks a GT520 that it's paired with. A GT520. Let that sink in. I would buy a new motherboard and CPU first. However I wouldn't get a x4 750k as that's already slacking behind. Get a FX6300 or FX8320 and overclock it. Don't spend 50$ on higher clock speeds that can be easily achieved within 10 minutes. Instead, put that 50$ towards a better GPU, like a GTX 660. It will be far better than a 8350 and 750ti. Also, you can SLi two 660s together to achieve between GTX 770 and GTX 780 performance.


How does sli work. Do i have to link wires connecting the two gpu or is this information i can find on the internet on youtube?
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March 11, 2014 2:33:22 AM

Worth remembering that whatever motherboard you get must be SLI compatible, not all are.
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March 11, 2014 2:38:24 PM

marshal11 said:
SLi is super easy. http://www.legitreviews.com/images/reviews/1891/test-sy... you can see in this picture that there is a cable connecting the 2 cards together on the left side of each card. That's all you need to do. A cable should be included.


So would SLi matter if its a AM3+ socket board with nividia gpu?
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March 11, 2014 2:46:25 PM

If you're asking whether there's a difference between SLI on an AMD board vs Intel board then no, there's no difference.
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