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Nas Hard Drives Vs Traditional internal Desktop Drives

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March 14, 2014 11:55:53 PM

I am looking to buy a 3-4 Terabyte hard drive for my PC and I'm wondering if I should go with a NAS drive (Seagate NAS HDD ST4000VN000) or just go with a traditional Internal drive like the Seagate Desktop HDD.15 ST4000DM000.

I am aware of the uses for NAS hard drives, however I plan on *not* using this in a 24/7 environment. I just need some more good reliable storage in my PC.

The reason I ask if I should go for the NAS drive is because the ST4000DM000 is rated for TWICE as many Load/Unload cycles, FOUR times the amount of Power-On hours, and has a 3 Year Warranty instead of 2.

The price difference isn't much when you find them on sale, so that isn't an issue.

What do you guys think?

a c 120 G Storage
March 15, 2014 12:11:20 AM

Very little difference - IMO it's just marketing between them IMHO.

I'd strongly recommend making sure you get a 7200RPM drive; many of the NAS ones are 5400RPM by memory. Intellipower is WD's way of avoiding stating it.

The three year warranty is the only thing I'd find useful.
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March 15, 2014 5:44:25 PM

Someone Somewhere said:
Very little difference - IMO it's just marketing between them IMHO.

I'd strongly recommend making sure you get a 7200RPM drive; many of the NAS ones are 5400RPM by memory. Intellipower is WD's way of avoiding stating it.

The three year warranty is the only thing I'd find useful.


I feel like you are right. These Seagate drives all have the same 1TB platters and even the same enclosures. Firmware, warranty, and Power-on+Load/unload rating seem to be the only difference.

It seems that all the 4TB drives I'm looking at now (I am limited by what I can find on sale) are 5900RPM, even the non-NAS drives. My thinking was that this drive is only for storage so I didn't mind a little bit slower RPM, but I should get 7200RPM? I think I would have to go down to a 3TB Seagate Barracuda to get 7200RPM.

The two best deals available right now that I have found are:

Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM 3TB for $99.99 2 Year warranty

Seagate NAS 5900RPM 4TB for $150 3 Year Warranty, (2x load/unload cycles, 4x power-on hours compared to Barracuda)

I would definitely consider another brand, but I have been looking for about a month and haven't seen anything better yet.
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a c 120 G Storage
March 15, 2014 6:04:57 PM

Cheapest drive per GB in the US is the 3TB Barracuda 7200. I'd go for one of those.
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a b G Storage
March 17, 2014 4:17:36 PM

Outside of an actual NAS/Server environment the difference in reliability is pretty small.
It's hard to say if the difference in reliability is larger than the difference in cost/performance.

If you've got a proper backup cheapest cost per GB is likely your best bet.
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March 18, 2014 8:53:42 PM

I ended up getting a 3TB 7200RPM Barracuda based on your input, thanks guys.

I paid $81 for it, and at that price $150 for a 4TB just didn't make sense anymore.
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March 18, 2014 9:12:41 PM

The reason for the 5400 and 5900 rpm drives in NAS is to reduce heat with them all packed together next to each other.
Next if you have forgot and not mentioned it is vibration of the heads from other drives and the recording track is being tracked not just the head over the platter. WD RE or Enterprise is recommended over the NAS RED for extreme uses and carries a 5 year warranty. But backup is what most people don't account for as drives fail over 2 years for various reasons after 2 years is mechanical failure. Sure a drive has a 5 year warranty if it fails you get another drive for 4 years so its important to buy from a place that isn't selling drives at a great price but you get it and the manufacture date is 6 months old now you have 4 1.2 years. But back to the point if you don't backup you lose all the time invested in that setup. A windows 7 setup takes almost a 1/2 to 3/4 of a day to setup check BIOS, install Win7, 150 patches, install antivirus, office suite, malwarebytes, google chrome, google extensions, pdf reader of preference, setup printer... that it's not worth your time to invest in a NAS like My book live or order a motherboard with hardware raid or run raid 1 instead with a SSD cache of I got to have raid 0
But wait I'm on Linux with raid 1 and WD RE drives and I cut the cable. What am I worried about???
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