Car Subwoofer - Powered by PSU

I've gotten a psu and jumped it, i then tested the connections using a voltmeter and the resulting volt was 11.97 however it stopped working and after restarting it it only gives out 1v, what has happened?

Pictures of the subwoofer setup at the minute, however it does not currently work properly as the power supply i'm using does not output enough amps


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  1. I have having trouble connecting the dots between the post title and your question.
  2. JackNaylorPE said:
    I have having trouble connecting the dots between the post title and your question.



    The psu in question will be used to power my subwoofer but it's only giving out 1v and it needs to be 12v
  3. Still confused. Why is this subwoofer not plugged into the wall?

    What make/model sub is it?
  4. USAFRet said:
    Still confused. Why is this subwoofer not plugged into the wall?

    What make/model sub is it?


    Ahhh i understand your confusion now, the subwoofer is intended for use in a car and i intend to make use of it in my room, sorry for not clarifying that
  5. Hi

    Is this a rare PC where the main psu has an external socket for a loud speaker ?

    Or some sort of external psu for the loudspeaker ?

    Either way you are probably have to buy a new 12 V external psu
    Which provides enough amps for amp or sub woofer
    3A 40 W does not seem enough
    What is ratting of sub woofer or amp ?


    Regards

    Mike Barnes
  6. I jumped the psu so that it would work without a motherboard and i intend to use the positive and ground connections of the cpu/gpu to power my subwoofer as a cheap option
  7. 02ryan48 said:
    USAFRet said:
    Still confused. Why is this subwoofer not plugged into the wall?

    What make/model sub is it?


    Ahhh i understand your confusion now, the subwoofer is intended for use in a car and i intend to make use of it in my room, sorry for not clarifying that


    02ryan48 said:
    I jumped the psu so that it would work without a motherboard and i intend to use the positive and ground connections of the cpu/gpu to power my subwoofer as a cheap option


    You're trying to use a computer PSU? Yehah, that probably won't work.
    There are many 110v -> 12v transformers out there.
  8. it was recommended to me by 2 people earlier who claimed that they had both done this although i'l be honest i thought it to be a bit out there as well, particularly as i'm no electrician... I've been searching for one however i can't seem to find what i'm looking for, is it possible you could link me on?
  9. Hi

    If you were an electronics hobiest or engineer you would know how to do this

    I have seen articles on how to
    make a old PC CPU into a 12 V psu
    But I would not do it myself .

    Transformer is not much use without a rectifier & regulator circuit

    google convert pc psu to 13.8v
    Gives some articles on this subject

    If you do not know about dangers of mains electricity and have experience of soldering you should leave to experts & buy a built unit


    Regards
    Mike Barnes
  10. 3 amps at 12V = 36 watts ..... my guess is your subwoofer wattage is well in to 3 digits...... mine is 550.
  11. mbarnes86 said:
    Hi

    If you were an electronics hobiest or engineer you would know how to do this

    I have seen articles on how to
    make a old PC CPU into a 12 V psu
    But I would not do it myself .

    Transformer is not much use without a rectifier & regulator circuit

    Regards
    Mike Barnes


    would it work if i found a transformer that changed it to DC 12v like i currently have it set up just with more amps?
    As it is now it works however only on very low gain, if i exceed this gain the sound just distorts
  12. Hi
    As previously mentioned what is the rating in amp or watts of this amp / woofer ?
    Note transformer converts voltage up or down ( but for AC only)
    And you need a regulated DC psu at about 13 V
    With a suitable power / current rating. ( watt / amp)

    Regards
    Mike Barnes
  13. The 3rd pic answers the PSU question .... 13.8v X 3 amps....I'm guessing that is input .... hardly enuff for ya typical subwoofer.
  14. Hi JackNaylorPE

    I assumed the 12V 3A Bremi PSU is the one that burnt out and he wants a replacement
    but until he says what the power rating of the sub woofer is we cant help him

    regards
    Mike Barnes
  15. Yes, a sI had indicated, 3 amps was pretty much doomed t failure.

    For a 100 watts sub, Id want something 200 watts RMS or so to avoid clipping
  16. 02ryan48 said:
    it was recommended to me by 2 people earlier who claimed that they had both done this although i'l be honest i thought it to be a bit out there as well, particularly as i'm no electrician... I've been searching for one however i can't seem to find what i'm looking for, is it possible you could link me on?


    Well, why ask us? Why not just ask them?
  17. No one can answer the question w/o knowing the amp / watt rating of the sub.
  18. The subwoofer has a 25a fuse on and so i'm assume it's 300w
  19. If the subwoofer cabinet has a 25a fuse that is essentially a piece of wire and has no protection value at all. If the sub amp you are using has a 25a fuse than the you will need a 12v regulated power supply with much more than 3 amp output. These are is closer to what you need
    http://www.amazon.com/Pyramid-PS14KX-Amp-Power-Supply/dp/B0002JTD20/ref=pd_sim_e_4?ie=UTF8&refRID=1G5X9J3QFNXY9RXHR6AP
    http://www.amazon.com/Pyramid-PS21KX-Amp-Power-Supply/dp/B0002JTD2A
    PC power supplies don't even come close to powering these kind of amps.
  20. Speakers Amps are generally rated on RMS (root mean square) .... which averages out the load..... however the peaks can easily exceed the average resulting in clipping which can damage speakers.....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipping_%28audio%29

    To demonstrate the effect, I find Fiona Fiona Apple's 1st album very good test for such behavior as her voice not only has wide vocal range but also a wide range of amplitude.

    The audiophile "rule of thumb" is to use an amplifier rated at twice the speaker's rating.
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