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How does this system look for Photoshop?

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March 16, 2014 1:14:37 PM

I have been thinking about getting a new computer and I have to admit that building my own while sounding great does intimidate the heck out of me. I have been looking at
ASUS M51AC-US004S Intel Core i7-4770, 16GB RAM, 1TB HD, Windows 8 Desktop
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D440SYW/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_n...
I apologize for being a bother but would love to get some informed opinions from you all. I thank you muchly. Sorry for asking repeat

More about : system photoshop

March 16, 2014 2:06:45 PM

No graphics card, what's the budget?
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March 16, 2014 7:57:05 PM

NVIDIA Geforce GT 620 Is the card that comes with the above system, the budget is well I would love to spend as little as possible but I would be willing to go up to $1000. I know the above system would need a larger HDD as I have almost 3Tb of photos on my current machine. I am currently using a slow Dell with only 8 Gb of RAM and it is pitiful. I do have a 3Tb internal on the current machine but wanted to see what you all think about the Asus I linked to. Once again thanks for any and all answers
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March 17, 2014 12:33:57 AM

Would you consider building your PC yourself?
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March 17, 2014 5:46:28 AM

DougSr said:
I have been thinking about getting a new computer and I have to admit that building my own while sounding great does intimidate the heck out of me. I have been looking at
ASUS M51AC-US004S Intel Core i7-4770, 16GB RAM, 1TB HD, Windows 8 Desktop
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D440SYW/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_n...
I apologize for being a bother but would love to get some informed opinions from you all. I thank you muchly. Sorry for asking repeat


DougSr,

The process of researching, ordering, assembling, configuring, and testing a system does seem intimidating as a list of tasks, but taken one step at a time, it is not difficult. The main advantage is being able to tailor a system to your use. Uses drive the choice of programs, the programs drive the choice of components, the choice of components drive integration as a system. The compatibility of components is high, there are thousands of YouTube videos- the problem is sorting out good ones- and building your system is a help in understanding the relationship of software to hardware as well as being able to do maintenance and repair.

Here is an idea for a system having some attributes useful to Photoshop, including a high clock speed, multiple cores, 16GB RAM, and a healthy HD. There is an option for graphics card as a workstation card like a Quadro or Firepro use drivers that are more image quality oriented than gaming / consumer cards that focus on frame rates in 3D. For example in certain programs / drivers, a Quadro can run 128x anti-aliasing. Much of the graphics card choice depends on other programs used and Adobe uses CUDA accleleration, so a GTX or Quadro will have some benefit. For example, if you are also using 3D and/o animation, After Effects, etc then the GTX 750, if there is video editing / Premiere, then I'd suggest GTX 580 3GB. If you are doing heavy effects processing but in 2D only, I'd suggest the Quadro K600. The more specific the definition of use, the better the system will be suited to it.

The prices are all from Newegg.com >

BambiBoom PixelPusher GrapharificadorendaBlaze PixWerkz 9000 £®©™?^(SM)©__REV 3.17.14

1. AMD FX-8350 Vishera 4.0GHz (4.2GHz Turbo) Socket AM3+ 125W Eight-Core Desktop Processor > $200

2. Cooler Master Hyper 101i - CPU Cooler with Dual Direct Contact Heatpipes - AMD Version > $15

3. GIGABYTE GA-970A-DS3P AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard > $85

3A. OPT'L> ASRock 990FX Extreme3 AM3+ AMD 990FX + SB950 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS > $110 (If the budget is flexible, a motherboard with the higher performing 990 chipset would be preferable)

4. Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLS2KIT8G3D1609DS1S00 > $135 (Latency=9. The 2 X 8GB allows 16GB to be added later fro 32GB)

5. GIGABYTE GV-N75TOC-2GI GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 Video Card > $170

5A. OPT'L> NVIDIA Quadro K600 VCQK600-PB 1GB GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 Low Profile Workstation Video Card > $160

6. Seagate Barracuda 7200.14 ST3000DM001 3TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive > $110

7. CORSAIR CXM series CX500M 500W ATX12V v2.3 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply> $60

8. SAMSUNG DVD Burner 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 24X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM SATA Model SH-224DB/BEBE - OEM > $20

9. Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case > $55

9A.OPT'L> Corsair Carbide Series 300R Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case > $70

9B.OPT'L> LIAN LI PC-7B plus II Black Aluminum ATX Mid Tower Computer Case > $80

10. Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 64-bit or Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit > $140

_____________________________________________________________________

TOTAL = $990

Cheers,

BambiBoom

HP z420 (2014) > Xeon E5-1620 quad core @ 3.6 / 3.8GHz > 24GB ECC 1600 RAM > Quadro 4000 (2GB)> Samsung 840 SSD 250GB /Western Digital Black WD1003FZEX 1TB> M-Audio 192 sound card > AE3000 USB WiFi > HP 2711X, 27" 1920 X 1080 > Windows 7 Ultimate 64 >[Passmark system rating = 3815, 2D= 767 / 3D=2044]

Dell Precision T5400 (2008) > 2X Xeon X5460 quad core @3.16GHz > 16GB ECC 667> Quadro FX 4800 (1.5GB) > WD RE4 500GB / Seagate Barracuda 500GB > M-Audio 2496 Sound Card / Linksys 600N WiFi > Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit >[Passmark system rating = 1859, 2D= 512 / 3D=1097]

2D, 3D CAD, Image Processing, Rendering, Text > Architecture, industrial design, graphic design, written projects [AutoCad, 3ds Max, Vray, Solidworks, Sketchup, Adobe CS, WordPerfect, MS Office]
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March 19, 2014 6:57:40 PM


PsychoGamingLemon and bambiboom I really would rather not build my own but I have to admit it does interest me. For the moment though I have started to think about an older MacMini for the while, I know it would not have the size of HDD I prefer but neither does the system I mentioned above and I do have a large external that I currently use to store everything along with a 3Tb internal. I really am indecisive about this cause I don't want to be replacing my machine in a few years.
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March 19, 2014 7:29:26 PM

DougSr said:

PsychoGamingLemon and bambiboom I really would rather not build my own but I have to admit it does interest me. For the moment though I have started to think about an older MacMini for the while, I know it would not have the size of HDD I prefer but neither does the system I mentioned above and I do have a large external that I currently use to store everything along with a 3Tb internal. I really am indecisive about this cause I don't want to be replacing my machine in a few years.


DougSr,

In my view the ASUS system with an i7-4770 @ 3.4GHz, 16GB RAM, 1TB HD at that price would be a very good performing system and it's more or less ready to go.

You mention being able to live with the 1TB HD so with the ASUS system, I suggest improving the graphics card. Actually the lower end GeForce cards are quite good in 2D, but Photoshop benefits from CUDA acceleration and so something like>

EVGA 02G-P4-3751-KR GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 Video Card > $155

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

> with 640 CUDA cores and 2GB memory should make for some quick pixel shifting.

This would push the system something over the idea of spending $1,000, but perhaps you can recover something from your previous system to keep to the budget. There are advantages to building a system as one can tailor the hardware to the uses and software, but researching, ordering, assembling, configuring, and testing can be a complex process and think of the value of your time in the total cost.

Overall, the ASUS system having a fast modern CPU, plenty of RAM, with a good graphics card added, and connection to your 3TB external drive should be useful a long while.

Cheers,

BambiBoom
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March 20, 2014 12:59:44 PM

Bambiboom,

Would the GeForce GTX 750 require a new power supply? Would there be an alternative that would not? I am sorry for all the continued questions but I am lost anymore when it comes to computers and their internals.
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March 20, 2014 1:03:10 PM

Bambiboom I apologize, I found the specs and it would require a new one. I think I will try it out and see if the current card will work. Thanks to all for your assistance.
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March 20, 2014 2:30:37 PM

DougSr said:
Bambiboom I apologize, I found the specs and it would require a new one. I think I will try it out and see if the current card will work. Thanks to all for your assistance.


DougSr,

I had a look but didn't see the PSU specification. However, I did learn that the GT 620 OEM version requires 30W and the standard version takes 49W. The GTX 750ti 2GB requires 60W. I should hope that the the power supply isn't so marginal that +20 or 30W would not be possible. What is the rating of the power supply?

Still, these lower end GeForce can be very good in 2D and this may surprise you, but the HD4600 graphics integrated into the i7-4770 may be even better in 2D than the GT 620 and the GTX 750ti. In Passmark performance Test, the top 10- i7-4770K / HD4600 IG systems scored 2D=987-1013 and 3D=652-822. An i7-4770 / 750ti system scored 2D=958 and 3D=3706. The top i7-4770 / GT 620 combinations were 2D=932-1016 and top 3D=932. So, if you are not using 3D, there is not a painful penalty in using the GT 620 or even the HD 4600. Try it and see.

I think the situation may be better than you think concerning the power supply. No company making graphics cards into the high performance realm would not make provision for something proportional with a strong CPU such as the i7-4770. The processor is 84W, the motherboard is say 10W, HD 10W, and so there should be plenty left.

I think that's a lot of computer for a bit over $800.

Cheers,

BambiBoom
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March 20, 2014 8:14:56 PM

Bambiboom the specs I got from Newegg show the Power Supply is 300W, I thought the video card you recommended needed bigger than the Asus had but held on to a glimmer of hope. Either way it is now a done deal and I will see what transpires when I get the machine on Saturday. I also got the Crucial M500 120GB Solid State Drive, hoping now to figure out the proper way to get it all put together in a way to make Photoshop and Lightroom work as fast as possible while possible being handcuffed. Either way it will(hopefully) smoke my current Intel i5CPU 650@3.20Ghz with 8 Gb of RAM and a Nvidia GeForce GT220. I,once again thank you and the others who have responded on this thread. The appreciation for insight beyond me cannot be expressed fully by my limited vocabulary.
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April 3, 2014 4:08:16 PM

Bambiboom and others who helped. I thank you muchly for your assistance, the Asus is working fine so far. I do have another question for you all though. I have a Crucial M500 120GB SSD and I installed it today. I have to ask the following silly question though, would I be better off using the SSD as a scratch disk for Photoshop or installing Photoshop or windows onto it. I have also installed my 3Tb drive into the Asus and along with the native 1TB and the Crucial that is all I can install for now. Well without taking out the DVD/CD that is. I once again ask the experts.
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April 4, 2014 7:20:50 AM

DougSr said:
Bambiboom and others who helped. I thank you muchly for your assistance, the Asus is working fine so far. I do have another question for you all though. I have a Crucial M500 120GB SSD and I installed it today. I have to ask the following silly question though, would I be better off using the SSD as a scratch disk for Photoshop or installing Photoshop or windows onto it. I have also installed my 3Tb drive into the Asus and along with the native 1TB and the Crucial that is all I can install for now. Well without taking out the DVD/CD that is. I once again ask the experts.


DougSr,

In my system, that is mostly image applications, there are good benefits from an SSD, though I didn't find them life-changing. I set up the SSD (Samsung 840 250GB) to contain Windows and all the applications. I like the system files and application files in one partition. Because SSD memory is unnecessarily worn by defragmenting, I installed everything on a mech'l drive in a partition slightly smaller than the 250GB. After loading everything, and cycling the system on and off several times to allow all the Windows updates- there were about 20,000 last time, I used a disk optimizer (PerfectDisk Free) which places files in order of system use. Then running the boot time defragmenter (this allows all files to be moved) completely consolidates free space. Then with everything fussed over and optimized, migrate to the SSD. Test the applications, run performance tests. With this pristine, optimized OS/Application setup, I make a system image EasuUs Todo Backup Workstation- and place it in a special partition on the mech'l drive, plus a backup on a remote disk. I have an external drive that is turned on only when backing up.

You might consider using the 1TB disk in the ASUS in the way I did with the 500GB Seagate that arrived int he HP z420. I installed the Seagate in a StarTech 3.5", USB 3.0 Aluminum external enclosure (about $40). This looks like a book and importantly has a switchable cooling fan. I set the disk up with partitions for file, archive, and a system image copy. Then, this disk is only run for backing up, which help isolates it from viruses or system problems, plus the disk will last forever. I have a 160GB Seagate that is about 6 years old I use in this way, and it shows no signs of fatigue.

By the way, if you have EasuUs Todo Backup Workstation, you could make a system image from your current computer and then use "Restore to dissimilar hardware" and restore your OS and applications very quickly to the new system. If your previous copy of Windows is a bit elderly, have all the drivers for the chipset, USB, and so on handy.

On my system, C:\ requires a total of 174GB, leaving about 65GB on the SSD. After migrating to the SSD, I used EaseUs Partition Master (free) to set a 10GB partition on the SSD. This has generic working file folders called "Documents","2D CAD", "3D Models", "Graphic Design," and so on. I place a copy of any large working files in that partition and then copy to their original location for backup each day. I'm doing a proposal now - 92- 11" X17" pages with lots of images- and 120MB- which uses a 75MB Sketchup model and I run both these files from the SSD partition copy- much faster.

I think the ASUS system is very good purchase -- and with a careful setup, represent a very good cost / performance system.

Cheers,

BambiBoom
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April 7, 2014 12:17:11 PM

Bambiboom I have to admit that you make my brain hurt with your comprehensive responses. I am at a loss to what your posts said there and for that I am ashamed. I used to consider myself a geek(in a good way) including owning a Commodore 64 when they first came out. I digress and apologize, back to subject, the main problem or main part that intimidates me is that I do not have a Windows 8 disk and am afraid of screwing up the current setup. Is there an easy cheap way to do the transfer of the OS to the SSD and go from there? I know that all my problems would probably be less if I would have built my own computer the way you said earlier and that still may happen one day but I am right now stuck with what I have. I will say that I did install my 3Tb that contains all of my photos in this machine and am pleased with it so far but I do need to get it all set up and install Photoshop and Lightroom so that I can start posting and selling photos. My main problem up to this point was getting Crashplan to work properly with this new machine, I am hoping that is now resolved and need to move onward and upward so to speak. I also have to admit that I am worried about installing the OS onto the SSD and not having the BIOS configured properly to boot from that hard drive. I know that I should not allow this to scare me but I admit I am worried about it. I apologize for being a pain and thank you for your assistance.
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April 7, 2014 2:11:43 PM

DougSr,

Sorry, another long one, but not to worry as you won't be risking ruining anything- there are multiple options.

As for your setup, I'll have to make a couple of assumptions, but if they're incorrect nothing should be ruined.

The first choice method is to watch some of the thousands of YouTube videos that explain how to "migrate" the OS to to an SSD. Some SSD's like Samsung include software to do it and including the way to change the position of the SATA cables, check BIOS and so on. The original OS is copied and should remain intact on the original HD, so you're not ruining anything.

Second method : A new system should have the original software installed in a partition on the HD. Check the size of that partition and make a partition of that size plus about 20% on your new 3TB drive and copy the restore partition to it. You then have three copies of the OS- the installed one on C: and two copies in special partitions- plenty of protection for future use. There is a good, free software to setup drives and partitions EaseUs Partition Master and then use Win Explorer to copy the full contents to the special partitions.

With the original HD in the Channel 0 SATA -the original location and the new SSD in Channel 1 formatted, set as a primary partition, and recognized in Windows Explorer, you can probably go to the restore partition and find the setup file or folder and click on setup. This will guide through the restore process and eventually ask you to select the destination for the restored system image which will be the drive letter assigned to the SSD. Before clocking on restore or install, be sure to check any boxes that align the sectors or "optimize for SSD" which will align the sectors.

When all is in place, clock on install or restore and the SSD will be setup with the original software for the ASUS. You then switch the SSD to the Channel 0 SATA- where the original HD was connected, boot to the setup BIOS and select "Boot Order" and see that the boot order starts with DVD, then the SSD. Then you can install your applications as normal.

Third Method : Ask ASUS to provide you with restore disks of the original software- for which they may charge a something, in which case, you install and configure the SSD in the place of the original HD and install the OS from the disks.

Really, I think you'll be able to do a relatively quick migration to the SSD.

This procedure varies from system to system but if something goes wrong or doesn't work, don't worry as the original OS software will remain on the original HD- so you can even install programs and get to work and fuss wiht he SSD later, plus there is the undisturbed copy in the restore partition(s) so you can try again. Remember to ensure the SSD has the sectors aligned or the performance will suffer.

You will need to sort through the good and bad YouTube videos but the good ones will make it all much clearer seeing a few will gain confidence. ASUS should give you advice as well. I was nervous when going to my first SSD in December.

Let me know how you get along with it.


Cheers,

BambiBoom
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April 7, 2014 5:53:08 PM

About method three, I contacted Asus and they said the only way to do the restore disk is to use a 16Gb flash drive as there is not one available. I am awaiting one from the mail since mine mysteriously disappeared(dang kids). I will wait until I get it and get the restore set up and then try one of the other methods you mentioned. I think it may be here tomorrow or the next day. I appreciate the help, I do have to ask though would it be ok to format the original HD post moving everything to the SSD? I mean more storage is more storage and it is a candidate for a Photoshop scratch disk

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April 7, 2014 9:48:20 PM

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DougSr,

While installation from flash drives seems to be common now, I'm not certain of the source of the content using the flash drive. Is this downloaded, in a partition or ,..? It still seems to me that you could simply clone the original HD to the SSD, but if that is the only source, in any method I recommend making a system image in a program like EaseUs Todo Backup and keeping it in a partition, perhaps a copy on both the 3TB and 1TB drives. You can also mount this on DVD's using ISO- dividing a program onto multiple disks, but I don't know fully how to do it with an OS so it is still installable- it's not just copying the files.

As far as the original HD goes, as long as you have at least one good usable copies of the OS safely stored, then sure, use the original HD. a 1TB is alot of storage. I recently organized my files and everything I've ever done on the computer since 1993- 23,000 documents, 22,000 images, 2,000 CAD files, and so on is only about 50GB. My music system with 100's of hours of recording is another matter, but even that is only about 400GB...

One other use is to buy a good 3.5" SATA III enclosure and use it as an external backup drive. My recent HP z420 came with a Seagate 500GB drive, and I bought a Star Tech USB 3.0 Aluminum enclosure with a switchable cooling fan (About $40) and run it only for backup. Teh transfer times are very good. Drives used this way are isolated form problems and last a long time as they are only used about twenty minutes per week. I have a 7 year old Seagate 160GB drive and while very slow, it's perfectly happy and both drives contain copies of the two current system images in partitions.

You might consider downloading Passmark Performance Test - there's a free 30-day trial and run the tests before and after the SSD upgrade. When I changed the graphics card (Firepro V4900 to Quadro 4000), added RAM (8GB to 24GB), and an SSD (Samsung 840 250GB) to the HP, the rating went from 2372 to 3923, with much of the improvement due to the SSD disk speed and much better 3D performance. The WEI (Windows Experience Index) changed from 5.9 to 7.4.

Cheers,

BambiBoom
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April 8, 2014 6:54:35 PM

As soon as I can get the flash drive and do what is needed to back up the OS on to it I shall take a stab at doing what I need to do with all of your suggestions. the copy on the 3Tb will most definitely be done and from there I will take other steps, mainly doing what you have said. I have to say that the major part of my problems or worries rather would be losing my 111.79 Gb of photos from 8 years of high school sports photography. Which is the main reason why I wanted to get a new computer, sifting through the duplicates or bad photos from this accumulation was painfully slow with the old computer and now that I have familiarized myself with Windows 8 I can almost guarantee that the task will be much faster. I will have to let you know after I am done with that task how much that amount was dropped. The Passmark performance test does intrigue me. I will give it a try. My WEI or the version of it in Win 8.1 is a paltry 4.5 right now. I guess I had better get to work at improving this thing, or maybe I really should have built the one you had priced for me above. Oh well live and learn I guess.
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April 10, 2014 5:24:24 AM

DougSr,

A tactic I used when setting up the HP z420 was to really refine the C: drive on the mech'l HD and I believe the performance over time will be enhanced. The reason to do this on the mech'l drive is to avoid unnecessary wear on the SSD. As you may know, the memory wears and SSD are not to be defragmented to avoid the wear. The access time on an SSD is almost instantaneous anyway, so defragging wouldn't help, but optimizing does seem to help and consolidation means that little pieces of files aren't going to be written and spread themselves into the gaps all over the place. In Passmark Performance test, the Seagate mech'l HD scored 724 (WEI score 5.9) and the optimized Samsung 840 scored 2930 (WEI 7.9) , which was noticeably above average.

1. I made a partition on the mech'l drive that was slightl smaller than the SSD capacity so I could migrate without resizing, loaded the OS, all the programs, fonts, and etc.

2. Then I used a free disk optimizer (PerfectDisk) in boot mode- this allows all files to be moved- that put all the startup files together at the front, and could completely consolidate the files.

3. I then cycled though quite a few shutdowns which triggered all the Windows updates- and there must have been 30,000 files changed, configured the programs to a certain extent, ran the optimizer to defragment and consolidate again-

4. and then made the system image with the pristine, unused, fully configured setup.

5. With the system image and possible copies tucked away, the next task was to migrate to the SSD by cloning or using the migration software and in any case, ensure that the migration is "optimized for SSD" or that the sectors are aligned.

This means that if I have a catastrophic failure of C:, I can quickly restore the OS and all programs and get back to work in an hour or do- just press a couple of buttons and wait. Because the system image was made before the OS / Programs were used and accumulated errors, all is pristine and at the highest efficiency as well as avoiding wear on the SSD.

The WEI on your system of 4.5 seems a bit "modest". Was the 4.5 one of the graphics scores?

I recently also went through and had a major re-organization of image files- I have 22,000 or so, or perhaps I have 20,000 plus copies,... Digital photography at essentially no cost and low cost, large HD's are too conducive to near duplicate shots- angles and multiple copies on the computer. Plus I needed to make a more careful folder structure with categories that are then subfoldered into subject and then topic. In the end I exorcised about 2.6GB of images and can now find what I want! -It's amazing! Don't forget how many photos can fit onto a couple of 4.7GB DVD's. These are so inexpensive that you might consider having a copy of absolutely everything before the culling.

Let me know how you get on. And, yes, I really recommend Passmark highly. The 2D performance will be an important measurement for your use. Every test has it priorities and weighed results- it's only relational to itself, but overall it's extremely useful to indicate which hardware or configurations / setup helps.

Cheers,

BambiBoom
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