Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Two choices: xeon e3-1245v3 with 180GbSSD or i7-4770 with 128Gb SSD + 1Tb HDD?

Last response: in Systems
Share
March 17, 2014 11:28:40 AM

Hello, this is my first post, so hope I've done it correctly, and I have read the other posts I could find regarding these two processors already. I am upgrading from an ancient XP system to a Win 7 pro 64 bit. I've narrowed my choice to two Lenovo Thinkstations. [30A1002UUS, or 30A10036US]. I realize that they are both far more than I need. Word processing is my heaviest activity. But, with occasional heavy use of photoshop with raw DSLR images, corel draw, painter, and video editing. Never gaming. These systems are basically identical in price and build except the xeon system has a 180Gb SSD and the i7 has both a 128Gb SSD plus a 1Tb HDD. I'm leaning towards the xeon system for the bigger ssd; I have lots of external storage already. My current system uses MAX 80Gb for windows and all software. My expansion needs are limited, perhaps a MIDI card, so form factor isn’t really an issue. The retailer is steering me towards the i7 system, claiming the xeon is too specialized and may not work with my software. Tech help at COREL said they knew of no issues. Also, I tend to have my computer on 16 hours per day. Any thoughts to help me decide? Thank you in advance.

Best solution

March 17, 2014 11:42:32 AM

The Xeon is just an i7 with no integrated GPU. Unless your external storage is USB 3.0, I would go with the 128 + HDD, as the HDD will be faster than what a USB 2.0 can do.
Share
March 17, 2014 11:57:09 AM

HiTechObsessed said:
The Xeon is just an i7 with no integrated GPU. Unless your external storage is USB 3.0, I would go with the 128 + HDD, as the HDD will be faster than what a USB 2.0 can do.


Thank you for the input. You don't think the 128Gb SSD might be cramped at all? And you are right, all my storage is USB 2, except i have an esata 3Tb drive on my laptop accessible through my network. i appreciate your input because I'm really head scractching on this one.
m
0
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
March 17, 2014 12:20:37 PM

Well, I'm just going by what you said about your software + Windows taking up a max of 80 GB. You don't need to worry about getting close to the max capacity on SSDs, so the 40GB would even give you some room for when you're trying to work on editing, that's what I do. I have a 128GB Samsung EVO Pro with about 35-40GB free.

Are you 100% set on buying pre-built? You could get much better bang-for-the-buck building yourself; which is pretty easy these days.
m
0
l
March 18, 2014 9:16:30 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Well, I'm just going by what you said about your software + Windows taking up a max of 80 GB. You don't need to worry about getting close to the max capacity on SSDs, so the 40GB would even give you some room for when you're trying to work on editing, that's what I do. I have a 128GB Samsung EVO Pro with about 35-40GB free.

Are you 100% set on buying pre-built? You could get much better bang-for-the-buck building yourself; which is pretty easy these days.


Well my choice is made easier as the 180Gb SSD machine is out of stock! Your input was helpful as I couldn’t be sure if the retailer was steering me towards a system based on their profit margin, or my needs. I really went over my math, and I’m pretty confident that 80Gb is a very generous estimate of my needs. Regardless of the machine I’ll probably add an extra internal drive, and since the system has usb 3, will probably get such a drive, or an esata card. The bigger box gives me more expansion room.

In terms of building a computer, the last time I built one was with a soldering iron and it was a 6502 processor programmed in binary with DIP switches, then an 8088 system, and my first hard drive was the size of a dishwasher! My current system is dying by the day and needs to be replaced soon. I can get the Lenovo system for $1200 Canadian. I priced out the parts separately doing my best to match them equivalent, and it came to $1500. By selecting the cheapest components without even considering if they could even work together it came to $750. And I simply have no clue how to choose a motherboard. I plan to build a system with my daughter during the summer, but for a critical system I need soon for work I’m pretty sure I need to buy a finished system...unless someone can convince me otherwise. But again, thank you for the input it’s helped me along the process to making a decision!
m
0
l
March 19, 2014 7:30:35 AM

Yeah, unless you have a bunch of programs/games to install, 120GB is generally enough for most people. It just doesn't sound like a lot when, for the same price, you can get a 1TB HDD lol

If you wanted to try building (which is VASTLY easier compared to what you did in the past lol) something like this would give you equivalent performance for much cheaper. These are all good, solid products. The CPU cooler listed is simply to make the system quieter, but is definitely not needed if you want to save an extra $20:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1220 V3 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($222.59 @ Newegg Canada)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.55 @ DirectCanada)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($50.99 @ Canada Computers)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.70 @ DirectCanada)
Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($81.50 @ Vuugo)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: Asus Radeon HD 5450 1GB Video Card ($34.00 @ Vuugo)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($39.98 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Antec 450W ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ NCIX)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($16.79 @ DirectCanada)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ NCIX)
Total: $739.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 10:28 EDT-0400)

Edit: to add, if a pre-built with direct technical/customer support is better, by all means, go with that! I definitely understand the hassle of trying to get a computer that is critical to productivity back up and running if something did go wrong. I just wanted to show you the value of building yourself.

That said, all of these products are good products that come with warranties. It's up to you lol
m
0
l
March 19, 2014 3:15:36 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Yeah, unless you have a bunch of programs/games to install, 120GB is generally enough for most people. It just doesn't sound like a lot when, for the same price, you can get a 1TB HDD lol

If you wanted to try building (which is VASTLY easier compared to what you did in the past lol) something like this would give you equivalent performance for much cheaper. These are all good, solid products. The CPU cooler listed is simply to make the system quieter, but is definitely not needed if you want to save an extra $20:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1220 V3 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($222.59 @ Newegg Canada)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.55 @ DirectCanada)
Motherboard: MSI H81M-P33 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($50.99 @ Canada Computers)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.70 @ DirectCanada)
Storage: Kingston SSDNow V300 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($81.50 @ Vuugo)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.75 @ Vuugo)
Video Card: Asus Radeon HD 5450 1GB Video Card ($34.00 @ Vuugo)
Case: Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($39.98 @ Newegg Canada)
Power Supply: Antec 450W ATX Power Supply ($29.99 @ NCIX)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($16.79 @ DirectCanada)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ NCIX)
Total: $739.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 10:28 EDT-0400)

Edit: to add, if a pre-built with direct technical/customer support is better, by all means, go with that! I definitely understand the hassle of trying to get a computer that is critical to productivity back up and running if something did go wrong. I just wanted to show you the value of building yourself.

That said, all of these products are good products that come with warranties. It's up to you lol


Thanks a bundle with the suggestions. I just used tiger direct to assemble an estimate and windows 7 was $ l60 from them. I was unaware of the part picker site. That will change things! My needs are fairly urgent as the god Zuul who was living in my fridge Now inhabits my HP Athlon x2 64 5000 + system and demands great sacrifice of my time to keep it appeased and running. ive succeeded in migrating all my work to my duo core 3GB Lenovo laptop but I'm paranoid enough to want not only data backup but system redundancy as well. What I think I might do is buy a machine for myself and build one for my etsy addicted wife and game addicted daughters! Maybe I just might build both if l summon the courage up! or the opposite and buy a small adequate system to replace the Ghostbuster machine And then craft my ultimate machine for myself. well l guess its my mulling time now, seriously though your suggestions have been invaluable



m
0
l
March 19, 2014 6:03:48 PM

Building is actually pretty easy these days. Check out CareyHolzman on YouTube, he does builds completely uncut, showing and explaining every detail of the process. It's quite fun, and very rewarding :) 

And no problem with the help, glad to give it :)  Loved your imagery too, by the way lol
m
0
l
March 26, 2014 10:17:26 AM

Well I'm addicted to PC part picker thanks to you! But my wife is addicted to Etsy, so we're all good
I've put together two systems here. One a little starter that my daughter and I could build. Then a big one to match the Lenovo system.
I did find the site a bit problematic as not all specs for the motherboards are listed, and reviews are puzzling. everyone at newegg hates whatever they buy! trying to find reasonable reviews is tough!

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/mgjacc/saved/4atP
http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/mgjacc/saved/4ayK

when you tossed me your link it had taxes included, can't seem to find this on the part picker site. Next if the small system looks good i have to decide if I want the hassle of ordering from 4 suppliers, or pay a bit more and get it from a single source.

Anyway, if you every have time to peruse my list and see if i'm getting the hang of it, or doing bad things like putting a micro atx board in an atx case let me know!

I've even priced out a little half way trick I could pull. Ordering the Lenovo as a base machine stripped right down, then swapping out the HDD and cloning it to my own SSD and adding my own second source of memory, because it is on these items that Lenovos price because to depart into the clouds quite quickly.

m
0
l
March 26, 2014 4:48:57 PM

The first one for your daughter is all fine except for the power supply. Even though it's not going to be a performance based build, I would still be more comfortable going with at least the Corsair CX430, for some kind of quality. Raidmax power supplies aren't very good.

There really isn't anything wrong with putting a mATX board in a full size case, all it does is give you less upgrade room in the future. This isn't ever a problem for like 99% of people who install a GPU and maybe a wifi card lol Two things wrong and one comment:

1) The Z87 board isn't needed since you're going with a locked CPU and not overclocking. You can save some money going with an H87 or even B85.

2) The RAM should be a 2x4GB kit, which will put your memory in dual-channel mode and perform faster. Paired with the SSD, you'll have crazy performance :) 

#) *Comment* You don't really need Windows Professional unless you plan on running over 16GB of RAM.

The part about PCPartPicker saying tax included is added when you do the actual picking. If it doesn't pull tax information from the website, it won't show up on the overview. I'm not familiar with Canadian taxes, so I have no idea what they are/should be lol

A little tip for PCPartPicker (if you do decide you want to just go with a single merchant), there is a link near the top right that says 'Breakdown by Merchant' that will give you a list of all those parts from the different merchants, and if they are available there and the price.
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 4:31:55 AM

Thanks again. and let me know when you've had enough of my questions!!
I will be using professional 64 bit software, because I will be using 16Gb or more in the future. I use 8Gb as a reference number to compare what I can build versus buy.

I was choosing the motherboard by features I felt I needed: 4 ram slots, to have the right number of sata ports, possible esata features USB 3 and PCIe etc and being ignorant of the chipset ignored it. I picked the ASUS Gryphon as a bit of a joke since its the name of my wife`s dog, whose hair has caused at least one computer and wall socket to short out. It has the Tuf armor to hopefully help, but I'm not wedded to such a choice.
I followed your suggestion and did some reading on all the features of the various chipsets and now have a basic understanding of what they provide.
I did read somewhere that a board must be RAID compatible to use SSD's properly, but cannot find that reference again. Is that true? If so it keeps me out of H81

Finally, for my daughter. I went over your build you were kind enough to send me, to see if I could reverse engineer how you picked the parts. I did come up with a simpler build for her, switching to pentium g3220 chip. Again, time permitting these seem to be candidates for my first build

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/mgjacc/saved/4bj2

or tiger direct has this bundle so i don't have to deal with multiple source mail order. My build falls in between the price of these two. Checking chip benchmarks they all seem to be roughly the same, certainly better than the AMD x2 64 5000+ with ddr2 I currently use.

http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...
http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

are these too 'unpowerful' to be anything but frustration?

again, thank you for your help, I'm pretty sure I'm going to build a machine with my daughter, then for my machine I'm still thinking about it.

m
0
l
!