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New Build ($1600) Need Review

Tags:
  • R4
  • EVGA
  • MSI
  • Intel i5
  • GeForce GTX 770
  • CPUs
  • 4670k
  • Wd Velociraptor
  • Build
  • Systems
  • Corsair
  • GPUs
  • H100i
  • Z878M
  • Gaming
  • Fractal Design
Last response: in Systems
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March 18, 2014 1:26:32 PM

Hello,

I'm a novice builder having built my first PC two summers ago. It was a budget gaming $700 PC with an AMD A6 CPU and a AMD Radeon HD 6800 Series graphics card.

This time around I've spent considerably more time researching the parts, looking at compatibility issues, and performance vs. cost carts.

What I'm hoping to do with this PC:
-I'm finishing my last semester of college, so this computer will be used primarily for gaming. I have a Chromebook laptop for papers and I backup all important files to the cloud.
-I want to be able to play new releases on max/ultra settings, including BF4, Blacklight Retribution, and Skryim (+mods). Elder Scrolls Online comes out in a couple of weeks and I would like to have this built by then and running on Ultra settings.

I intentionally left room for upgrading possibilities. A year from now I will probably buy another graphics card to SLI and, possibly, more RAM.

The parts I've put together are below. From my research I know that the Fractal R4 case, the MSI 787M Gaming MoBo, and Corsair H100i (placed at the top of the case) will all fit together. I've decided to go with a closed-looped liquid cooling system instead of the Hyper 212 because my apartment does not have air condition. As a result, summer temperatures in my building can get warm and quite humid.

Tech-masters of Toms Hardware please review the parts below and voice any recommendations or concerns about my potential build. Any and all input is appreciated.

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/baglea45/saved/45UD

Thank you!
baglea45

More about : build 1600 review

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March 18, 2014 1:41:42 PM

I wouldn't go for a mATX motherboard in an ATX case but it's personal preference. Also unless you are planning on multiple monitors 4GB VRAM is useless. Hard drive I would recommend at least 1TB if not 2 or 3. That PSU is unneccesary with only one card and something like an RM 650 would be better suited.
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March 18, 2014 1:44:45 PM

i would get this personaly no liqued cooler but the air cooler is equal to most liqued cooler as quiter in most cases

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Micro Center)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U14S 55.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme3 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.00 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.99 @ Micro Center)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Micro Center)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1556.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:43 EDT-0400)
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March 18, 2014 1:48:27 PM

honestly it is an excellent build and all is compatible

but if you want some mor graphic horsepower you can change the ssd to an evo and the hdd to a caviar blue. the performance difference is better on paper but in gaming you wont see a huge difference like you would from going to a 780

i changed psu to a xfx as it is cheaper and just as reliable as a axi series this left some room to add the 780, i also left it at 850 so you have the option to sli later on

even if you want to keep your setup, unless you are gaming on 1440p+ resolution, triple monitors, or a heavy amount of mods you dont need 4gb of vram

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cciN
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cciN/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cciN/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($98.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: MSI Z87M GAMING Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($150.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($85.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($84.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($535.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1543.78
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:44 EDT-0400)
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March 18, 2014 1:49:05 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($98.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: Avexir Core series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($114.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 530 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($104.00 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1502.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:48 EDT-0400)

I would try to go with this build, not only is it cheaper but it also has a 780 :) 
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March 18, 2014 1:53:19 PM

Cheaper with a 780ti. :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($98.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($669.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1588.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:52 EDT-0400)
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March 18, 2014 1:59:19 PM

Overall looks pretty good. Just a few comments:

1. Storage mix - I'm not sure if it's a mistake, but you have a 10000RPM 500GB drive listed. Absolutely no need for that. You want an SSD for the OS and programs and then a big fat 2TB or more 7200RPM HDD.

3TB still has the lowest $$/GB, so this one fits the bill: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/seagate-internal-hard-driv...

2. At this stage in the game with SSDs, I'd really suggest going with a 240GB or higher SSD. You can't beat the performance of the 840 Pro - the 256GB version is available for $199. A good mainstream SSD, like the Samsung 840 Evo or the Crucial M500 will still give you SSD performance at a much better price point. If $199 is too high for you, I think you will be happier with a 240GB mainstream drive than a 128GB performance drive. You can get the Crucial M500 240GB for $105 and the slightly better performing Samsung 840 240GB for $140.

3. You selected the absolutely most expensive GTX 770 model you can buy. In fact, you're starting to encroach on GTX 780 pricing at that price point. My own opinion is that you won't realize the premium you're paying for that card in performance gains. I'd suggest either (1) pushing for the GTX 780, (2) downgrading to a GTX 770 2GB card, or (3) if you really want the 4GB, then there are other options (such as this PNY http://pcpartpicker.com/part/pny-video-card-vcggtx7704x...) for as much as $70 cheaper. Another option is this MSI gaming version, which matches your motherboard color scheme for $40 cheaper. The MSI cooler on this generation of cards is simply awesome. Very quiet and very effective.

3. Motherboard. You have a uATX motherboard in an ATX case. So, I would just recommend getting one of the MSI Gaming ATX versions. The GD45 is $140, and the GD65 is $160.

Edit: Or, you can just go with logainofhades' build above - GTX 780ti and you'll be gaming for sure.
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March 18, 2014 2:33:33 PM

Hey all (replying from work). Thanks for all the sound advice. I'm going to make a few changes for sure. Probably go with the MSI Z87 Extreme4 for starters.

You guys don't think that, given the lack of air conditioning, a liquid cooling would do better than a heat sink and fan?

Also.. Can someone please explain the difference between the ram you're suggesting and the ram j picked? (VRAM vs.. ?)
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March 18, 2014 2:36:55 PM

logainofhades said:
Cheaper with a 780ti. :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($98.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($669.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1588.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:52 EDT-0400)


Not bad , but I wouldn't cheap out on the PSU, especially that one. I've heard the voltages are pretty unstable and with a 780ti I would't mess with it given the fact he might sli later on. Also I would try to go with a seagate barracuda or western digital blue for only $3 more. Lastly I would change the ram to 1866 A Data, cheaper and faster at $65
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March 18, 2014 2:45:03 PM

if you got the money then i would keep the water cooling. it will be better when you decide to overclock anyway
the difference in ram speed doesnt really matter in gaming unless it is a dramatic decrease in cas latency. 1600 ram with a cl of 8 or 9 is equivalent to 2133 speed with a cl of 10 or 11 and it scales as such for gaming.

vram you dont need 4gb unless you are gaming on 1440p+ resolution, triple monitors, or a heavy amount of mods. if you are gaming on 1080 then 2gb is enough if you dont do any of that stuff
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March 18, 2014 3:55:51 PM

Bad_Kitty13 said:
if you got the money then i would keep the water cooling. it will be better when you decide to overclock anyway
the difference in ram speed doesnt really matter in gaming unless it is a dramatic decrease in cas latency. 1600 ram with a cl of 8 or 9 is equivalent to 2133 speed with a cl of 10 or 11 and it scales as such for gaming.

vram you dont need 4gb unless you are gaming on 1440p+ resolution, triple monitors, or a heavy amount of mods. if you are gaming on 1080 then 2gb is enough if you dont do any of that stuff



Thanks for the heads up on the VRAM. I will only have 1 monitor for now (maybe 2 down the road).

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March 18, 2014 4:00:27 PM

logainofhades said:
Cheaper with a 780ti. :) 

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($98.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($669.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($92.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1588.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-18 16:52 EDT-0400)



Will probably go with something very similar to this! Might upgrade the PSU or keep the one I currently had.

Thank you!
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March 18, 2014 4:02:43 PM

a 2 monitor setup dont eat up vram like a 3monitor because a 3 monitor setup will be producing images for each monitor with the game you are playing. and most likely you are just going to have the other monitor for browsing music and such not producing imaging for the game you are playing.
i do the same thing and dont even really notice a difference when using to not using second monitor, so you will be fine with a 2gb version of a 770 if you didnt want to go with a 780 build from above
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March 19, 2014 7:36:58 AM

RazerZ said:


Not bad , but I wouldn't cheap out on the PSU, especially that one. I've heard the voltages are pretty unstable and with a 780ti I would't mess with it given the fact he might sli later on. Also I would try to go with a seagate barracuda or western digital blue for only $3 more. Lastly I would change the ram to 1866 A Data, cheaper and faster at $65


I haven't heard any such thing about that power supply. WD owns Hitachi, btw. While the 1866 ram doesn't do much for performance, I agree, if it is cheaper go for it.
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