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Gaming PC Build, Need Help.

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March 19, 2014 11:57:40 AM

Hello guys/girls, I am looking to build a gaming PC that will topell all others for about $1200. Infact I have already picked out all the parts for one, I just need feedback from all of you telling me wether this build is viable or not, what I should change, and what I should leave the same. Anything you could tell me would be helpful, Thanks.
*Edit* Sorry about no link for PcPartPicker, http://pcpartpicker.com/user/gothicdarkstar/saved/45po hope this helps
also, the reason for the motherboard is I am hoping to do some major upgrading along the road and maybe some OC, Plus I really like all the options for System fan connectors on this motherboard (6 system fan 4-pin connectors)
*Edit* With everything I have been reading and seeing I am beginning to rethink my previous build so I came up with a new one, will this suit my needs better?
Final Build
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-Pro (V Edition) ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V2 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Asus VE228H 21.5" Monitor ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
Other: Cooler Master HAF 922 W/ All Black Interior ($79.99)
Total: $1193.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 17:17 EDT-0400)


Previous Build

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($204.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Formula ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($299.79 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive[/url] ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card ($175.38 @ Newegg)
Case: ARMOR-EVO ATX Full Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B BRONZE 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($101.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE228H 21.5" Monitor[/url] ($132.58 @ Newegg)
Total: $1199.68

More about : gaming build

March 19, 2014 12:01:03 PM

Would be nice to in the future to have the PC partpicker link.

The main thing I see is that your PSU is insanely overpowered (especially for a 750Ti), unless your considering a massive upgrade in the future.

Edit: Good motherboard but I do not understand why you would get one at that price point with all those features (it is an enthusiast board) when all of your other hardware will not be able to to take advantage of it. Case in point, you don't even have an unlocked CPU, so why would you get an OCing board?

I would get a good middle of the road board and then sink that money into a GTX 770
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 12:01:11 PM

You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:06:45 PM

For that budget, this is a system that I designed. It is very "overclocking" compatible, which will allow you to squeeze everything you can from it.

Sorry....this is an updated version. The other didn't include a monitor. The "See As Plain Text" option isn't working good on PC Partfinder today.

Component Selection Base Price Promo Shipping Tax Price Where
CPU
Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $219.00 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime $219.00 Amazon
Buy
CPU Cooler
Corsair H60 54.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $49.99 $49.99 NCIX US
Buy
Motherboard
Asus Z87-Pro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $184.00 -$15.00 FREE $169.00 Newegg
Buy

$15.00 mail-in rebate

Memory
Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $92.99 FREE $92.99 Newegg
Buy
Storage
Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk $169.99 $0.99 $170.98 Newegg
Buy
Video Card
EVGA GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card
Case
Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime $89.99 Amazon
Buy
Power Supply
Corsair Gaming 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $89.99 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime $89.99 Amazon
Buy
Optical Drive
Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $84.99 -$20.00 $0.99 $65.98 Newegg
Buy

$20.00 mail-in rebate

Operating System
Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) $99.98 $99.98 OutletPC
Buy
Monitor
Asus VS247H-P 23.6" Monitor $157.00 $157.00 B&H
Buy
Base Total: $1237.92
Mail-in Rebates: -$35.00
Shipping: $1.98
Total: $1204.90
Share
a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:09:24 PM

This'll do it:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($489.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1196.17
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 15:09 EDT-0400)
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:22:52 PM

Overspending on motherboard / chassis and power supply.

Hell that graphics card is way underpowered for a serious gaming machine.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cJwU
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cJwU/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3cJwU/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD4H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($159.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($85.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Micro Center)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Samsung S22C350H 21.5" Monitor ($109.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1204.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 15:22 EDT-0400)



10x better graphics card and generally a much more balanced build.
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March 19, 2014 12:33:15 PM

XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7
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March 19, 2014 12:33:55 PM

minerva330 said:
Would be nice to in the future to have the PC partpicker link.

The main thing I see is that your PSU is insanely overpowered (especially for a 750Ti), unless your considering a massive upgrade in the future.

Edit: Good motherboard but I do not understand why you would get one at that price point with all those features (it is an enthusiast board) when all of your other hardware will not be able to to take advantage of it. Case in point, you don't even have an unlocked CPU, so why would you get an OCing board?

I would get a good middle of the road board and then sink that money into a GTX 770

Thanks for your input I am new to this and this is my first build so it is a little shaky
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:37:10 PM

Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.
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March 19, 2014 12:41:43 PM

dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If the budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 or more on top of that than get a Samsung Evo for your OS and such. I will openly admit that a SSD is awesome, probably the single biggest jump I have ever had in overall performance from one item, however, if I was on a tight budget I would much rather put the money towards a GPU.
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March 19, 2014 12:45:22 PM

minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:46:08 PM

minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If the budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 or more on top of that and get a Samsung Evo for your OS and such. I will openly admit that a SSD is awesome, probably the single biggest jump I have ever had in overall performance from one item, however, if I was on a tight budget I would much rather put the money towards a GPU.


We will definitely agree to disagree on this one then. LOL
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March 19, 2014 12:53:52 PM

Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 12:57:26 PM

minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL
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a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:03:00 PM

dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.
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March 19, 2014 1:03:13 PM

minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


So what is a good range for GB on SSD coupled with a 1TB HDD? Or should I just stick with the 1TB HDD?
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March 19, 2014 1:04:11 PM

It depends on your budget. You can get a good SSD for less than $100. Samsung Evo 840 is a great choice. They are really driving down the market and have excellent reviews....http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hmmm...a Porsche 911 Turbo or I know a more storage space. #firstworldproblems
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a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:08:29 PM

You can get a Kingston 120GB for $70, or a PNY XLR8 for $65. For your first SSD, they will still be immensely faster than a regular HDD, and only marginally slower than an 840 EVO.
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March 19, 2014 1:08:56 PM

Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:11:35 PM

minerva330 said:
It depends on your budget. You can get a good SSD for less than $100. Samsung Evo 840 is a great choice. They are really driving down the market and have excellent reviews....http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Hmmm...a Porsche 911 Turbo or I know a more storage space. #firstworldproblems


You're absolutely right. HDD's are disappearing FAST. I give them 5 years MAX and they won't even be available for sale anymore. They are going the way of the old floppy disk. It's old technology being replaced with MUCH better performance and reliability that can be found in the SSD.
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March 19, 2014 1:19:43 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board. However, I think it is always nice to more options than less.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 1:22:25 PM

Didn't the Kingston SSD's have a lot of complaints over the fact that they were slower that a regular hard drive. Evidence was pointing to a factory that was using Asynchronous NAND but I am still not sure I would want one..
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March 19, 2014 1:22:57 PM

minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 1:24:30 PM

Spoiler
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?


Only if you go overboard and oc it to an unstable state. (i.e, 5 Giga hertz) so yes, OC can reduce component life, but only if it is unstable and having high temps. and bad voltages.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 1:25:03 PM

Thanks to everybody for quoting so much that this page is now oversized.
USE SPOILERS DAMNIT!
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March 19, 2014 1:27:56 PM

XxD34THxX said:
Spoiler
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?


Only if you go overboard and oc it to an unstable state. (i.e, 5 Giga hertz) so yes, OC can reduce component life, but only if it is unstable and having high temps. and bad voltages.


Is there any place where I could go learn to OC safely? Because if what your saying is true, I don't see the real harm.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:28:36 PM

Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
Thanks to everybody for quoting so much that this page is now oversized


We can quote some more if it would make the happy


You know, Brados....I'll quote you on that! LMAO :p 
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March 19, 2014 1:29:51 PM

Spoiler
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.
said:


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?


They are partially right...if you do not know what you are doing. However, Z87 boards are known for their OCing potential while H87 do not OC. You have a unlocked CPU but a OCIng board.

It makes more sense to spend $15 to have the ability to OC in the future if you ever decide to do so. The alternative would be buying new hardware if you ever wanted to OC. Who knows in a few years once you become more savvy you could squeeze some extra life out of your set-up without having to buy anything
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 1:31:44 PM

Spoiler
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
Spoiler
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?


Only if you go overboard and oc it to an unstable state. (i.e, 5 Giga hertz) so yes, OC can reduce component life, but only if it is unstable and having high temps. and bad voltages.


Is there any place where I could go learn to OC safely? Because if what your saying is true, I don't see the real harm.


uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. I'm not an OC expert. but try this.

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March 19, 2014 1:33:47 PM

XxD34THxX said:
Spoiler
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
Spoiler
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
Brados22 said:
minerva330 said:
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
XxD34THxX said:
You should atleast get a 660 GPU... And Win 8.1 unless you absolutely hate it.


I do hate windows 8 I would like to stick with Win 7


Whatever you finally decide on, I strongly advise on making sure that the build has a good SSD instead of conventional hard drive. The only people who would suggest otherwise are the ones who have never used a good SSD. LOL The only thing that a conventional HDD is good for anymore is mass storage of rarely used items, such as photos, movies, videos, etc. A strong SSD gives you an insane jump in speed/performance in every aspect of your PC, including but not limited to gaming.


I would disagree, I think a SSD is a luxury item. For someones first gaming build it makes more sense to sink that money into the video card and upgrade later. If is budget is a tight $1200 than Nouvake build is the most balanced. If he can afford another $100 on top of that than get an Samsung Evo 120gb for your OS and such.


Question would it be viable to have both SSD and HD or just one or the other?


It really depends on your storage needs. Most people have both. A SSD for your OS, Apps, and maybe a few choice games. A HDD for media content and other games (Titanfall is 50GB unpacked so I did not put that on my SSD). If you have deep pockets you can get a 1TB SSD but they are about $500. It depends or your needs, likes, and budget. Getting a small capacity SSD coupled with a high capacity HHD will give the best performance to price ratio


I can't agree more. I actually paid $425.00 for only 512GB of space, but I bought a Samsung 840 Pro. The only way to beat the 840 Pro is go with a PCI-e SSD, and then you're talking about STUPID money. I found a 10.24TB PCI-e SSD a couple of weeks ago for $124,000.00. And no, that isn't a typo. It was LITERALLY over a hundred thousand dollars! LOL


But for a newbie gaming PC, that $400 could be MUCH better spent elsewhere. The difference between an 840 Pro and a Kingston V300 is minimal. I bought a V300 for my dad, who has the same CPU just locked, and his bootup time is only about 2 seconds slower than my 840 Pro.

No matter what, this build with a 760 + SSD will ALWAYS be slower than with a 770 and regular HDD.


Brados22 said:
Please check out the new build if you haven't already, I think it will satisfy most of you. If not please tell me what else I can do to get the best bang for my buck.


Much more balanced. The only thing I would recommend is that you dish out another $15 or so and get the 4670k. The k denotes that the CPU is unlocked and therefore can be overclocked. That way you can take full advantage of overclocking potential if you ever you decide to do so, otherwise get a H87 board.


I might just do that the only reason I am very hesitant to OC is this is my first build and I wanted to stay away from OC because I am inexperienced and it could be harmful. Most tech savvy friends I have, have warned me to stay away from OC, Saying it would diminish my hardware's life, is this true?


Only if you go overboard and oc it to an unstable state. (i.e, 5 Giga hertz) so yes, OC can reduce component life, but only if it is unstable and having high temps. and bad voltages.


Is there any place where I could go learn to OC safely? Because if what your saying is true, I don't see the real harm.


uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. I'm not an OC expert. but try this.



Kinda feel a little stupid from that, Thanks tho
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March 19, 2014 1:34:24 PM

Darn it, you beat me to it. In all honesty OCing isn't that hard. If you can follow directions, have a little common-sense, and patience you can OC
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March 19, 2014 1:42:57 PM

Spoiler
minerva330 said:
Darn it, you beat me to it. In all honesty OCing isn't that hard. If you can follow directions, have a little common-sense, and patience you can OC


I probably won't OC the day I get it and put it all together I might wait a little while, maybe till my warranty's void??? Anyways I want to say a big THANK YOU!!!!!!!!! To everyone that has contributed to this build. I have edited my new build to be what looks like my final and hope to be going to getting parts tomorrow or the next day. If there is still an outstanding issue that I have ignorantly ignored please PLEASE let me know, I hope this will satisfy all of you as it has me. *Future outlook* I am going to be OCing in the future plus adding an additional 200mm side fan, and a 250-500GB SSD when I am able to afford it.
Thank y'all so much.
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:45:08 PM

Brados22 said:
Spoiler
minerva330 said:
Darn it, you beat me to it. In all honesty OCing isn't that hard. If you can follow directions, have a little common-sense, and patience you can OC


I probably won't OC the day I get it and put it all together I might wait a little while, maybe till my warranty's void??? Anyways I want to say a big THANK YOU!!!!!!!!! To everyone that has contributed to this build. I have edited my new build to be what looks like my final and hope to be going to getting parts tomorrow or the next day. If there is still an outstanding issue that I have ignorantly ignored please PLEASE let me know, I hope this will satisfy all of you as it has me. *Future outlook* I am going to be OCing in the future plus adding an additional 200mm side fan, and a 250-500GB SSD when I am able to afford it.
Thank y'all so much.


No prob! Make sure to choose a solution so that people quit posting here. LOL Good luck man! Let me know how it goes!
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March 19, 2014 1:50:58 PM

Spoiler
dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
Spoiler
minerva330 said:
Darn it, you beat me to it. In all honesty OCing isn't that hard. If you can follow directions, have a little common-sense, and patience you can OC


I probably won't OC the day I get it and put it all together I might wait a little while, maybe till my warranty's void??? Anyways I want to say a big THANK YOU!!!!!!!!! To everyone that has contributed to this build. I have edited my new build to be what looks like my final and hope to be going to getting parts tomorrow or the next day. If there is still an outstanding issue that I have ignorantly ignored please PLEASE let me know, I hope this will satisfy all of you as it has me. *Future outlook* I am going to be OCing in the future plus adding an additional 200mm side fan, and a 250-500GB SSD when I am able to afford it.
Thank y'all so much.


No prob! Make sure to choose a solution so that people quit posting here. LOL Good luck man! Let me know how it goes!


Will do, thank you for helping me with the build, it was your motherboard that sold it for me into changing into my new build because I could use my favorite case (HAF 922) to its full potential with the boards 4 system fan headers, Thank you.

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a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:55:40 PM

Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 1:58:30 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


Everyone has an opinion, I suppose. LOL
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March 19, 2014 1:58:42 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).
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March 19, 2014 2:01:05 PM

Spoiler
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Minerva330, I have to admit you've been my favorite here, and one of the most helpful posters, Thank you.
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a b 4 Gaming
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March 19, 2014 2:01:58 PM

minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Dang it minerva! I wasn't going to tell him! I was gonna let him stew! LOL :D 
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March 19, 2014 2:03:26 PM

Brados22 said:
Spoiler
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Minerva330, I have to admit you've been my favorite here, and one of the most helpful posters, Thank you.


:love: 
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March 19, 2014 2:05:57 PM

Spoiler
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Dang it minerva! I wasn't going to tell him! I was gonna let him stew! LOL :D 


And you are very light hearted and fun to post with XD I hope we meet again on a different thread Dustin
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a b 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 2:09:10 PM

Brados22 said:
Spoiler
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Dang it minerva! I wasn't going to tell him! I was gonna let him stew! LOL :D 


And you are very light hearted and fun to post with XD I hope we meet again on a different thread Dustin


Thanks man! I am always smiling. Life is too short not to enjoy every minute of it! :D 
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March 19, 2014 2:10:58 PM

dustinhunt78 said:
Brados22 said:
Spoiler
dustinhunt78 said:
minerva330 said:
HiTechObsessed said:
Don't pay $1200 to get a crappy GTX 660, that's a crappy build. That build is way overpaying for a bunch of stuff that won't actually increase your performance. The 660 will get you about High settings at 1080p, where the 770 will give you Ultra/MAX at 1080p.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: SilenX EFZ-120HA5 86.0 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z87 Killer ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($61.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($327.36 @ B&H)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Acer G246HLAbd 60Hz 24.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1173.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-19 16:54 EDT-0400)


His build does include a GTX 770. Look at his original post. He took bits and pieces of everyone's suggestions and advice rather than cut and paste someones build directly (which is the way you should do it).


Dang it minerva! I wasn't going to tell him! I was gonna let him stew! LOL :D 


And you are very light hearted and fun to post with XD I hope we meet again on a different thread Dustin


Thanks man! I am always smiling. Life is too short not to enjoy every minute of it! :D 

I hear that brother!

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a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 2:11:48 PM

Well I apologize for missing that, but the Supernova 650 is not well made, only their 750w+ are recommended. A better power supply would definitely be recommended, especially if you are planning to SLI in the future. A 750w-850w would be good.
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March 19, 2014 2:16:52 PM

HiTechObsessed said:
Well I apologize for missing that, but the Supernova 650 is not well made, only their 750w+ are recommended. A better power supply would definitely be recommended, especially if you are planning to SLI in the future. A 750w-850w would be good.

I dont think I am planning to SLI in the future but the Supernova 750 is on sale for 60 so i might just do that

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a c 269 4 Gaming
a b B Homebuilt system
March 19, 2014 2:22:03 PM

If you're not going to SLI in the future, you're way overpaying for the motherboard then. And for $60 you can get the Antec HCG 620w, which is a much better quality power supply.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 19, 2014 2:31:15 PM

780 TI.
END OF POSTING SOME CLOSE THIS THREAD
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March 19, 2014 2:37:14 PM

If you have any concerns or questions PM me, thread is now closed thanks again everyone that posted!
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!