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Broadwell coming Build Ivy Bridge or Haswell Now

I am 4-5 yrs from my last build. I have been busy working & out of the loop. The current editions of my 'power' applications & O/S have over-run my system's ability to be really productive.

Gaming is not my priority (some games) BUT mainly for audio/video processing & editing plus music score generation (heavy graphics and cpu needs).

Do I go ahead and build with an Ivy Bridge (maybe i7-3770K) which will do the job today or go with a Haswell (i7-xxxx?) for possible future cpu upgrades?

My budget is $1200.- to $1400.- and needs to include: Win7-Pro 64 O/S, 500 to 750GB SSD primary, 2 X 2TB HDD, & a minimum of 16GB memory. New monitor if budget will allow but I have some room here.

Opinions? Suggestions? I could use some help here, Thank You.
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about broadwell coming build ivy bridge haswell
  1. This is all I can put together to do what you need to within ($49 over actually) your budget.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.68 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($249.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1449.58
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 01:37 EDT-0400)
  2. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dE7E
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dE7E/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dE7E/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V2 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($155.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda XT 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($142.00 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 270X 2GB Video Card ($245.66 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT H230 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1408.57
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 01:56 EDT-0400)
  3. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dEi9
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dEi9/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dEi9/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.68 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V2 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($155.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus Radeon R9 270X 2GB Video Card ($245.66 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT H230 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1381.24
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 02:02 EDT-0400)
  4. I don't like the look of the builds above personally. It looks like corners were cut that didn't need to be. Up to the OP though
  5. Best answer
    Mephikun said:
    This is all I can put together to do what you need to within ($49 over actually) your budget.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.68 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($249.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1449.58
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 01:37 EDT-0400)


    No reason for a z87 board when you are running xeon, also a cooler is not necessary.
    He wont be needing a 750w PSU, and OP specifically asked for windows 7 pro 64bit.


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V3 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($244.68 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($95.24 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 500GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($249.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital WD Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.94 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1389.79
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 07:52 EDT-0400)
  6. I chose the z87 board because I knew it was compatible, as I've seen some boards having issues with Xeon processors. I chose that PSU due to it being Tier 1 and being extra efficient and in case they wanted to SLI in the future. Wiggle room never hurt anyone. I added the cooler because we both know stock coolers suck for heavy editing. That CPU is gonna run way hotter with the stock heatsink

    I looked past Windows 7 pro and that actually was my fault, I thought it just said Windows 7 which would have added more to the cost so I selected 8.1 OEM which was the cheapest.
  7. Which board have problems with xeon processors?

    The extra efficiency wouldn't be noticed on performance nor electricity bill. It would require you to run 18+ hours a day on full load to actually benefit on a larger scale going with a gold certified PSU than a bronze certified.

    Surely it suck, but that shouldn't be his highest concern. The stock coolers should be more than fine if you aren't going to overclock, might be a little noisy and hot, but in case that gets annoying, he would always have the option to buy a CPU cooler.
  8. I don't remember what board it was but I remember recommending the Xeon to someone before and their board didn't quite like it. They were previously using an i3 (I think it was), same socket etc and I tested it and it worked so it wasn't the CPUs fault.

    Most should support it just fine, I just recommend boards I know are compatible when I recommend xeons.
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