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Building a new system from the ground up for gaming (switching fron console to pc). Need suggestions on configuration/hardwar

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March 21, 2014 8:37:29 AM

Hello,
I 'm in the process of switching from console to pc gaming. I have not built a system in a long time. The, already made systems, that I have been looking at seem sub-pair. I heard from a few people that if you have a budget, and you are not sure what to get, this is the forum to ask.
The system I'm looking to build is primary going to be used as a gaming system. The family and I will also watch blue rays or stream video to the TV from the system.
I have a budget of 600 (I know that's not much) what I a looking to get is something that is upgradable but can be bear bones kit to start off with.
Would like:
-Mother board should be able to handle up to 16-32G men
-at least 8G good memory to start off with
-Video card would like to start off with a really good one for gaming
-sound card can support good surround sound
-hard drive SSD would be nice but 7,200 would be fine for now for prices wise
-Can support blue tooth for head set and contorller
-would like a blueray player
-Tower, open to suggestions

With that mind I have about 600 to spend. I don't need a monitor will be using 51'inch tv. Key board and mouse I already have.
Suggestions on tower, mother board, mem, graphics card, sound card (if needed), blue ray player, with the ability to upgrade later, would be greatly appreciated.
Sorry for the long post.

Thanks for reading.
March 21, 2014 8:52:18 AM

Quick question, will it be a 5.1 or 7.1 home theater system?
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March 21, 2014 8:55:12 AM

It's 5.1..
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March 21, 2014 8:59:20 AM

Ok, I will see if I can put something up together. The 5.1 or 7.1 may influence the sound card choice.
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March 21, 2014 9:04:16 AM

Thank you very much!!! yes I will be keeping the 5.1 for a while longer. The next upgrade will be the sound system, but that will most likely not be for another year.
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a b 4 Gaming
March 21, 2014 9:07:12 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dNOC
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dNOC/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3dNOC/benchmarks/

CPU: AMD FX-6300 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Pro3 R2.0 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($65.66 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 1GB Video Card ($117.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.99 @ Mwave)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Micro Center)
Optical Drive: LG UH12NS30 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($97.26 @ OutletPC)
Total: $633.84

Do you need an OS?

A sound card is not needed as modern motherboards come with on board 5.1, most of them have 7.1 or higher.
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March 21, 2014 9:35:14 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($77.25 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G43 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($59.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Antec Three Hundred ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Micro Center)
Optical Drive: LG UH12NS30 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DS 24-bit 192 KHz Sound Card ($44.99 @ NCIX US)
Other: IOGEAR GBU421 USB Bluetooth 2.1 USB Micro Adapter ($9.99)
Total: $605.16
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 12:33 EDT-0400)

On the contrary, a sound card would be needed for Dolby Digital Live support, which most motherboard vendors do not supply.
Best I could do with the os included. The Bluetooth adapter is listed under other.

edit: to describe necessity of sound card
So, from reading up on the subject a little bit, I can try to describe the situation of onboard vs video card. So yes, onboard chipsets are capable outputting 5.1 and 7.1. However, this is only for audio signals that are already compressed in a certain format. So playing your blueray movies should be just fine (I think). However, outside of this you will encounter problems. The sound card is needed to encode the signal or else it would simply play out as a 2.1. I'll quote an old post to better relay the info. Also, will you be using a receiver with a spdif connection?

Quote:
Okay this is going to be a bit of a long winded explanation but bare with me and read it through

Most onboard audio DACs support both 7.1 output over 3.5 mm stereo jacks. You will need to use 4 of these plugs for a 7.1 system (Front L/R, Side L/R, Rear L/R, Center / Sub). Alternatively you also have an optical connection. The optical connection conforms to the S/P-DIF specification which means that it can transmit either stereo audio or AC3 (Dolby Digital) or DTS encoded audio. The optical connection cannot be used to transmit 6 or 8 channel LPCM.

In order to use the optical connection you must have an audio source which is encoded in AC3 or DTS. You must also configure the audio filters to pass the encoded audio through without decoding it first. If you do not do this, you will only get stereo.

Difficulty: outside of videos very few PC applications have AC3/DTS encoded audio. Games perform all of their audio rendering uncompressed and don't bother to compress it because it has to be decompressed to be sent to the speakers anyway. When you see the "Dolby Digital" symbol on a game box that usually just indicates that the game has prerendered cutscenes with surround sound. Any cutscenes that use the game engine can simply use the game's audio renderer instead and avoid unnecessary complications.

In order to get arbitrary audio over optical you must buy a sound card which has support for Dolby Digital Live or DTS Live. These are real time encoding methods that will capture the uncompressed audio that would be sent to the PC speakers and encode it into an AC3/DTS bitstream that can be sent across the optical connection to an external receiver. Some motherboards have a Creative Labs sound card built in that supports this but very few do.
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March 21, 2014 10:12:09 AM

usbgtx550 said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($77.25 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G43 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($59.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Hitachi Ultrastar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R7 260X 1GB Video Card ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Antec Three Hundred ATX Mid Tower Case ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 430W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($19.99 @ Micro Center)
Optical Drive: LG UH12NS30 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DS 24-bit 192 KHz Sound Card ($44.99 @ NCIX US)
Other: IOGEAR GBU421 USB Bluetooth 2.1 USB Micro Adapter ($9.99)
Total: $605.16
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-21 12:33 EDT-0400)

On the contrary, a sound card would be needed for Dolby Digital Live support, which most motherboard vendors do not supply.
Best I could do with the os included. The Bluetooth adapter is listed under other.

edit: to describe necessity of sound card
So, from reading up on the subject a little bit, I can try to describe the situation of onboard vs video card. So yes, onboard chipsets are capable outputting 5.1 and 7.1. However, this is only for audio signals that are already compressed in a certain format. So playing your blueray movies should be just fine (I think). However, outside of this you will encounter problems. The sound card is needed to encode the signal or else it would simply play out as a 2.1. I'll quote an old post to better relay the info. Also, will you be using a receiver with a spdif connection?

Quote:
Okay this is going to be a bit of a long winded explanation but bare with me and read it through

Most onboard audio DACs support both 7.1 output over 3.5 mm stereo jacks. You will need to use 4 of these plugs for a 7.1 system (Front L/R, Side L/R, Rear L/R, Center / Sub). Alternatively you also have an optical connection. The optical connection conforms to the S/P-DIF specification which means that it can transmit either stereo audio or AC3 (Dolby Digital) or DTS encoded audio. The optical connection cannot be used to transmit 6 or 8 channel LPCM.
....


Thank you both for the information!! If the OS is exclude ( might be able to get windows 8.1 64 bit from work) I am assuming that a pc of the hardware would be able to be upgraded and which one would you go with.

Thanks again for all the spec's!!!
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Best solution

March 21, 2014 10:52:02 AM

If the os is excluded, I would keep my build for the most part and get an amd 6300 with a 750ti if it can fit in the budget.

edit: Seems the promo for the computer case I listed has just ended. The one woltej1 listed is also rather good. I'm a bit of a fan of antec, so I'm going to go ahead and recommend the antec one from ncixus for 35.
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