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Will TRIM work with 1 SSD (not in RAID) + 2 HDDs (in RAID 1)?

Tags:
  • NAS / RAID
  • Storage
  • Build
  • Hard Drives
  • SSD
Last response: in Storage
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March 23, 2014 8:29:48 AM

I have read a lot of material with conflicting answers to this question and still don't feel confident. The question is for a build I plan to do, not for my current PC.

If it is possible, what steps should I perform to ensure TRIM is enabled with the 2 HDDs in RAID 1?

If more details are required please ask. Thanks in advance.

More about : trim work ssd raid hdds raid

March 23, 2014 8:32:08 AM

trim is just for solid state. what kind of data are you protecting that needs raid?
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March 23, 2014 8:34:27 AM

lxgoldsmith said:
trim is just for solid state. what kind of data are you protecting that needs raid?


Sorry yes, I meant maintaining TRIM for the SSD specifically, while also running the HDDs in RAID 1. It will be media and databases mainly.
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March 23, 2014 8:38:20 AM

Yes, trim will work. all you have to do is keep your motherboard in ahci mode and use windows to make a mirrored volume.

http://www.buildegg.com/bewp/?p=44
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March 23, 2014 8:38:51 AM

Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.
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a b G Storage
March 23, 2014 8:40:35 AM

Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.
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March 23, 2014 8:41:18 AM

lxgoldsmith said:
Yes, trim will work. all you have to do is keep your motherboard in ahci mode and use windows to make a mirrored volume.

http://www.buildegg.com/bewp/?p=44


This is fantastic, you're the best
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March 23, 2014 8:41:44 AM

DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.
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March 23, 2014 8:42:23 AM

DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


Thanks for the suggestion, I will think about that. I plan to only have my OS and applications on there though which can all be replaced relatively painlessly.
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March 23, 2014 8:45:41 AM

lxgoldsmith said:
Yes, trim will work. all you have to do is keep your motherboard in ahci mode and use windows to make a mirrored volume.

http://www.buildegg.com/bewp/?p=44


Spectre694 said:
Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.


So it seems I have two potential solutions now. Any thoughts on advantages and disadvantages of each? Not sure which to opt for.
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March 23, 2014 8:46:30 AM

lxgoldsmith said:
DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.


You're right, I guess when I hear RAID I always assume a separate controller, as I would never use a motherboard RAID anyway.
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a b G Storage
March 23, 2014 8:51:35 AM

DataMedic said:
lxgoldsmith said:
DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.


You're right, I guess when I hear RAID I always assume a separate controller, as I would never use a motherboard RAID anyway.


Assuming you have a recent intel chipset 77 or 87 the mobo raid is actually pretty good I've set up 0, 1, and 5 with it. Windows raid is a little slower and I have never had much luck with it. But since it sounds like data backup is your goal I don't think it will matter.
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March 23, 2014 8:55:21 AM

Spectre694 said:
Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.


Spectre694 said:
DataMedic said:
lxgoldsmith said:
DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.


You're right, I guess when I hear RAID I always assume a separate controller, as I would never use a motherboard RAID anyway.


Assuming you have a recent intel chipset 77 or 87 the mobo raid is actually pretty good I've set up 0, 1, and 5 with it. Windows raid is a little slower and I have never had much luck with it. But since it sounds like data backup is your goal I don't think it will matter.



Would this mean Spectre694's suggestion is slightly better?
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March 23, 2014 8:56:42 AM

Spectre694 said:
DataMedic said:
lxgoldsmith said:
DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.


You're right, I guess when I hear RAID I always assume a separate controller, as I would never use a motherboard RAID anyway.


Assuming you have a recent intel chipset 77 or 87 the mobo raid is actually pretty good I've set up 0, 1, and 5 with it. Windows raid is a little slower and I have never had much luck with it. But since it sounds like data backup is your goal I don't think it will matter.


Motherboard RAID array's are fine as long as nothing goes wrong. But try rebuilding with even one bad sector, and half the time you're completely screwed. I've had to recover data from several RAID 1 array's that wouldn't rebuild from either disk just because of a few bad sectors.
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a b G Storage
March 23, 2014 9:04:26 AM

DataMedic said:
Spectre694 said:
DataMedic said:
lxgoldsmith said:
DataMedic said:
Enabling trim will not have any effect on standard hard drives as they don't support it. Trim does have some speed advantages for SSD's but you should be aware that it makes data recovery almost impossible if anything ever is accidentally deleted from the drive. So be sure to back up your SSD.


I think he means setting up the ssd with trim while the motherboard is in raid mode, which doesn't always work. it requires setting up the ssd first and then switching and setting up the two hdd.


You're right, I guess when I hear RAID I always assume a separate controller, as I would never use a motherboard RAID anyway.


Assuming you have a recent intel chipset 77 or 87 the mobo raid is actually pretty good I've set up 0, 1, and 5 with it. Windows raid is a little slower and I have never had much luck with it. But since it sounds like data backup is your goal I don't think it will matter.


Motherboard RAID array's are fine as long as nothing goes wrong. But try rebuilding with even one bad sector, and half the time you're completely screwed. I've had to recover data from several RAID 1 array's that wouldn't rebuild from either disk just because of a few bad sectors.


Good point. You really need a decent raid card for the best luck rebuilding arrays you can force a mobo but that is kinda complicated and doesn't always work.

@DataMedic sounds like you have used it so what has been your luck rebuilding windows mirrored drives?
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March 23, 2014 9:13:05 AM

Spectre694 said:
Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.


After doing some reading, and with my own experience with current PC using onboard RAID and easily swapping drives, I prefer this solution. Is there any issue with switching from AHCI to RAID post installation of OS though?
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a b G Storage
March 23, 2014 9:16:28 AM

aurora446 said:
Spectre694 said:
Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.


After doing some reading, and with my own experience with current PC using onboard RAID and easily swapping drives, I prefer this solution. Is there any issue with switching from AHCI to RAID post installation of OS though?


No AHCI is a subset of the RAID commands. The reason you have to switch is because some SSD (Samsung and others) have trouble setting themselves up under RAID even though the commands are still available.
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March 23, 2014 9:16:48 AM

Spectre694 said:

Good point. You really need a decent raid card for the best luck rebuilding arrays you can force a mobo but that is kinda complicated and doesn't always work.

@DataMedic sounds like you have used it so what has been your luck rebuilding windows mirrored drives?


Best option, is a good separate RAID controller I prefer Adaptec. Windows RAID 1 is OK, they don't tend to have as many issues with rebuilding as motherboard RAID array's do. However Windows RAID should never be used for any stripe array's. REALLY SLOW!
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March 23, 2014 9:17:56 AM

Spectre694 said:
aurora446 said:
Spectre694 said:
Yes I have the same thing except with a SSD and Raid 0. Easiest way is put the SSD in install Windows in AHCI mode then plug in the two HDD switch to RAID mode and set up the Array.


After doing some reading, and with my own experience with current PC using onboard RAID and easily swapping drives, I prefer this solution. Is there any issue with switching from AHCI to RAID post installation of OS though?


No AHCI is a subset of the RAID commands. The reason you have to switch is because some SSD (Samsung and others) have trouble setting themselves up under RAID even though the commands are still available.


Thanks a lot. I feel much more confident now
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!