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Would this computer build be compatible and will it run high end games

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  • Components
  • MSI-Microstar
Last response: in Components
March 23, 2014 7:11:34 PM

Corsair Vengeance CMZ16GX3M2A1600C10 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3
$205.00
Intel Core i7 4770K Intel Core i7 4770K
$395.00
Western Digital WD Green 3TB WD30EZRX Western Digital WD Green 3TB WD30EZRX
$135.00
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit with SP1 OEM Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit with SP1 OEM
$115.00
MSI Z87-G45 Gaming Motherboard MSI Z87-G45 Gaming Motherboard
$199.00
Samsung 840 EVO Series 250GB SSD Samsung 840 EVO Series 250GB SSD
$189.00
NZXT H440 Mid Tower Case Black/Red NZXT H440 Mid Tower Case Black/Red
$159.00
Corsair Hydro Series H100i CPU Cooler Corsair Hydro Series H100i CPU Cooler
$149.00
Zotac 780ti $800
Corsair 860 watt platinum $360

More about : computer build compatible run high end games

March 23, 2014 7:16:01 PM

yes that would
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Best solution

March 23, 2014 7:42:32 PM

If I may make some recommendations on your suggested build:

RAM: Corsair Vengeance, no brainer, great choice. Although, what speed did you get? Little on the expensive end for Vengeance 16GB. RAM speed isn't very noticeable until you hit the 2011 socket motherboard/CPU's or unless you run Virtual Machines.
CPU: Why an i7? Depending on what games you play, Hyperthreading actually decreases performance in gaming by as little as 1% and as high as 10%, although you do get more processing power and typically cache with the i7, the i5 has always been a cheaper alternative that does everything you need it to do when doing primarily gaming. Very few games, such as Battlefield 4 for instance, "do" support Hyperthreading, the majority of HT support is in audio/video editing programs such as Sony Vegas, Photoshop, etc.
HDD: Not a bad choice, and certainly not a bad price for 3TB
OS: Do yourself a favor and get Windows 7 Professional - you forfeit so many features when you buy any Home Edition version of Windows.
Motherboard: Asus has always been the best motherboard manufacturer providing you with all the bells and whistles that you could ever want. UEFI BIOS, easy overclocking capabilities, easy fan speed adjustment, and many more. The best choice in my opinion, and in many other gamers' opinion would be to get an Asus board paired with either the 1155 socket i5-3570k (which is what I use), or the 1150 socket i5-4670k.
SSD: Great choice, I own one myself, just be sure to move your paging file to your HDD, disable your hibernation file and store all your games on your HDD, I still have about 190GB left on mine with Windows 7 Pro and other stuff, such as Word and stuff.
Case: Not a bad case, NZXT makes some nice cases. I own the Cooler Master HAF X for about an extra $60-70 and it's fantastic and rather illuminating with the 4 Blue LED case fans :) 
Cooler: Corsair makes great closed-loop liquid cooling systems, certainly not a bad choice.
GPU: Sounds like you've got some money to be playing around with the 780Ti, haha. I own the EVGA GTX 760 FTW 4GB Card and it is fantastic, it is factory overclocked to compete with a stock-light overclock 770 and runs very cool (never seen it run over 65C with EVGA's ACX Cooling. I haven't heard many things about the brand Zotac, mostly the GPU battle of NVIDIA is between Asus and EVGA, EVGA being my personal favorite.
PSU: The EVGA SuperNova 1000w Platinum PSU is about $220 when I bought it back in November and it is great, $360 is a lot of money to go for something you can get for cheaper. It is 100% modular which is very nice when dealing with cable management inside the case, freeing up space and creating less heat.

Hope I was of some help :) 
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March 23, 2014 8:05:46 PM

zAustin said:
If I may make some recommendations on your suggested build:

RAM: Corsair Vengeance, no brainer, great choice. Although, what speed did you get? Little on the expensive end for Vengeance 16GB. RAM speed isn't very noticeable until you hit the 2011 socket motherboard/CPU's or unless you run Virtual Machines.
CPU: Why an i7? Depending on what games you play, Hyperthreading actually decreases performance in gaming by as little as 1% and as high as 10%, although you do get more processing power and typically cache with the i7, the i5 has always been a cheaper alternative that does everything you need it to do when doing primarily gaming. Very few games, such as Battlefield 4 for instance, "do" support Hyperthreading, the majority of HT support is in audio/video editing programs such as Sony Vegas, Photoshop, etc.
HDD: Not a bad choice, and certainly not a bad price for 3TB
OS: Do yourself a favor and get Windows 7 Professional - you forfeit so many features when you buy any Home Edition version of Windows.
Motherboard: Asus has always been the best motherboard manufacturer providing you with all the bells and whistles that you could ever want. UEFI BIOS, easy overclocking capabilities, easy fan speed adjustment, and many more. The best choice in my opinion, and in many other gamers' opinion would be to get an Asus board paired with either the 1155 socket i5-3570k (which is what I use), or the 1150 socket i5-4670k.
SSD: Great choice, I own one myself, just be sure to move your paging file to your HDD, disable your hibernation file and store all your games on your HDD, I still have about 190GB left on mine with Windows 7 Pro and other stuff, such as Word and stuff.
Case: Not a bad case, NZXT makes some nice cases. I own the Cooler Master HAF X for about an extra $60-70 and it's fantastic and rather illuminating with the 4 Blue LED case fans :) 
Cooler: Corsair makes great closed-loop liquid cooling systems, certainly not a bad choice.
GPU: Sounds like you've got some money to be playing around with the 780Ti, haha. I own the EVGA GTX 760 FTW 4GB Card and it is fantastic, it is factory overclocked to compete with a stock-light overclock 770 and runs very cool (never seen it run over 65C with EVGA's ACX Cooling. I haven't heard many things about the brand Zotac, mostly the GPU battle of NVIDIA is between Asus and EVGA, EVGA being my personal favorite.
PSU: The EVGA SuperNova 1000w Platinum PSU is about $220 when I bought it back in November and it is great, $360 is a lot of money to go for something you can get for cheaper. It is 100% modular which is very nice when dealing with cable management inside the case, freeing up space and creating less heat.

Hope I was of some help :) 




Hey could you recommend a pc build for me I'm having heaps of trouble.
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March 23, 2014 8:32:11 PM

Hellbus91098 said:
zAustin said:
If I may make some recommendations on your suggested build:

RAM: Corsair Vengeance, no brainer, great choice. Although, what speed did you get? Little on the expensive end for Vengeance 16GB. RAM speed isn't very noticeable until you hit the 2011 socket motherboard/CPU's or unless you run Virtual Machines.
CPU: Why an i7? Depending on what games you play, Hyperthreading actually decreases performance in gaming by as little as 1% and as high as 10%, although you do get more processing power and typically cache with the i7, the i5 has always been a cheaper alternative that does everything you need it to do when doing primarily gaming. Very few games, such as Battlefield 4 for instance, "do" support Hyperthreading, the majority of HT support is in audio/video editing programs such as Sony Vegas, Photoshop, etc.
HDD: Not a bad choice, and certainly not a bad price for 3TB
OS: Do yourself a favor and get Windows 7 Professional - you forfeit so many features when you buy any Home Edition version of Windows.
Motherboard: Asus has always been the best motherboard manufacturer providing you with all the bells and whistles that you could ever want. UEFI BIOS, easy overclocking capabilities, easy fan speed adjustment, and many more. The best choice in my opinion, and in many other gamers' opinion would be to get an Asus board paired with either the 1155 socket i5-3570k (which is what I use), or the 1150 socket i5-4670k.
SSD: Great choice, I own one myself, just be sure to move your paging file to your HDD, disable your hibernation file and store all your games on your HDD, I still have about 190GB left on mine with Windows 7 Pro and other stuff, such as Word and stuff.
Case: Not a bad case, NZXT makes some nice cases. I own the Cooler Master HAF X for about an extra $60-70 and it's fantastic and rather illuminating with the 4 Blue LED case fans :) 
Cooler: Corsair makes great closed-loop liquid cooling systems, certainly not a bad choice.
GPU: Sounds like you've got some money to be playing around with the 780Ti, haha. I own the EVGA GTX 760 FTW 4GB Card and it is fantastic, it is factory overclocked to compete with a stock-light overclock 770 and runs very cool (never seen it run over 65C with EVGA's ACX Cooling. I haven't heard many things about the brand Zotac, mostly the GPU battle of NVIDIA is between Asus and EVGA, EVGA being my personal favorite.
PSU: The EVGA SuperNova 1000w Platinum PSU is about $220 when I bought it back in November and it is great, $360 is a lot of money to go for something you can get for cheaper. It is 100% modular which is very nice when dealing with cable management inside the case, freeing up space and creating less heat.

Hope I was of some help :) 




Hey could you recommend a pc build for me I'm having heaps of trouble.


Sure, PM me your budget and what kind of games you look forward to getting and I'll try and answer any questions you have.
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March 24, 2014 4:28:20 AM

zAustin said:
Hellbus91098 said:
zAustin said:
If I may make some recommendations on your suggested build:

RAM: Corsair Vengeance, no brainer, great choice. Although, what speed did you get? Little on the expensive end for Vengeance 16GB. RAM speed isn't very noticeable until you hit the 2011 socket motherboard/CPU's or unless you run Virtual Machines.
CPU: Why an i7? Depending on what games you play, Hyperthreading actually decreases performance in gaming by as little as 1% and as high as 10%, although you do get more processing power and typically cache with the i7, the i5 has always been a cheaper alternative that does everything you need it to do when doing primarily gaming. Very few games, such as Battlefield 4 for instance, "do" support Hyperthreading, the majority of HT support is in audio/video editing programs such as Sony Vegas, Photoshop, etc.
HDD: Not a bad choice, and certainly not a bad price for 3TB
OS: Do yourself a favor and get Windows 7 Professional - you forfeit so many features when you buy any Home Edition version of Windows.
Motherboard: Asus has always been the best motherboard manufacturer providing you with all the bells and whistles that you could ever want. UEFI BIOS, easy overclocking capabilities, easy fan speed adjustment, and many more. The best choice in my opinion, and in many other gamers' opinion would be to get an Asus board paired with either the 1155 socket i5-3570k (which is what I use), or the 1150 socket i5-4670k.
SSD: Great choice, I own one myself, just be sure to move your paging file to your HDD, disable your hibernation file and store all your games on your HDD, I still have about 190GB left on mine with Windows 7 Pro and other stuff, such as Word and stuff.
Case: Not a bad case, NZXT makes some nice cases. I own the Cooler Master HAF X for about an extra $60-70 and it's fantastic and rather illuminating with the 4 Blue LED case fans :) 
Cooler: Corsair makes great closed-loop liquid cooling systems, certainly not a bad choice.
GPU: Sounds like you've got some money to be playing around with the 780Ti, haha. I own the EVGA GTX 760 FTW 4GB Card and it is fantastic, it is factory overclocked to compete with a stock-light overclock 770 and runs very cool (never seen it run over 65C with EVGA's ACX Cooling. I haven't heard many things about the brand Zotac, mostly the GPU battle of NVIDIA is between Asus and EVGA, EVGA being my personal favorite.
PSU: The EVGA SuperNova 1000w Platinum PSU is about $220 when I bought it back in November and it is great, $360 is a lot of money to go for something you can get for cheaper. It is 100% modular which is very nice when dealing with cable management inside the case, freeing up space and creating less heat.

Hope I was of some help :) 




Hey could you recommend a pc build for me I'm having heaps of trouble.


Sure, PM me your budget and what kind of games you look forward to getting and I'll try and answer any questions you have.


Can you help me on my threadt to please? http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-2078706/upgrade-...
I really need the advice of a professionnal
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