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computer generating too much heat.

Tags:
  • Overheat
  • Computers
  • Heating
  • Heat
  • Components
  • Heatsinks
Last response: in Components
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March 23, 2014 11:26:58 PM

Hello,
greetings,
Well this problem occurs every summer.
whenever i use my pc it tries to cook me alive,it generates so much heat that i have to switch on the air conditioner even on a 20c day.I would like to know if buying a water cooler would do any good but i don't think that it will make a huge difference.

specs -
i5 2300 (sandy bridge)
gtx 640
deepcool gammax 300 air cooler
not a ton of fans,2 exhaust fans,2 intake fans
i would like to mention that i remove the side panel of my pc whenever I use it.

Thanks

More about : computer generating heat

March 23, 2014 11:59:12 PM

What do you use your computer for? If mostly idle tasks like web browsing it shouldn't be generating a ton of heat, the gtx640 and i5 2300 are very power efficient at idle.
Does the task manager shows 100% CPU usage even when you aren't running any programs? Also the GPU. You can check GPU percentage usage using MSI Afterburner. If either one is running at high percentages when computer is at idle then you may have some issues.
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March 24, 2014 12:00:34 AM

i game with my pc and yes the usage does jump to around 100% on both gpu and cpu.
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March 24, 2014 12:11:03 AM

So it is at 100% just after you reboot, before loading any programs?

Are you running or have you ever installed BOINC, Folding@home, any cryptocurrency mining software etc? They may be running in the background.

Have you had a look at the processes tab in windows task manager to see if any one process is using a high percentage of the CPU at idle?
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March 24, 2014 12:34:10 AM

cpu idle usage - 10%
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March 24, 2014 12:51:19 AM

That is not particularly high for idle. That would seem to rule out any virus or other program hogging the CPU power.

Is it possible you just live in a small, well insulated room and game heavily often (using max power)? Even a moderate power computer can quickly heat up a smallish room, especially when gaming.

I would suggest getting access to a wall-socket power meter and measuring the actual power usage of your computer. If it is less than ~100 watts at idle, then I wouldn't necessarily blame the computer. If it is significantly more than 100 watts, then something may be wrong (e.g. virus, driver issue, anti-virus program issue).
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March 24, 2014 1:04:35 AM

i live in a room which is pretty small (12feetx12feet) and it has always heated up during summers,what i need is a solution that does not involve software,gimme a cooler for example because my pc (in terms of virus, driver issue, anti-virus program issue) is fine.
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Best solution

March 24, 2014 2:18:59 AM

A new cooler will not cause your computer to "generate" less heat (your room will be just as hot). Your computer will be consuming the same amount of electricity leading to the same heat output. But it will keep the cpu at a cooler temperature relative to the ambient temperature. It will just be more efficient at moving the thermal energy from the CPU into the air in your room.

If you are worried about your CPU overheating, then a new cooler would do some good (your current cooler is ok, but not great). If you've got the money to spend, I would recommend a good air cooler such as a Noctua NHD14 or NHC14 over a lower price water cooler. You might also want to consider adding an additional exhaust fan to your case.

But if it is the room temperature you are worried about then a new cooler will do no good whatsoever. What you would need in that case is either better room ventilation (eg open a window) or more power efficient computer components.
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March 24, 2014 2:36:09 AM

ok thanks a lot,you realy helped.
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