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What is a Raid 0 Configuration

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  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
March 24, 2014 7:56:26 PM

Hello!

I have been hearing about Raid 0 Configurations for storage. What is it and what is it used for? BTW I have a 1 TB Hard drive(HDD) and a Samsung EVO 128 SSD.

Thanks!

More about : raid configuration

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March 24, 2014 8:10:33 PM

I'm gonna give you a bit of background to better answer this.

RAID stands for "Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks" and was originally designed to use multiple ordinary drives together to provide fault-tolerance (drive failure protection). RAID 1 is a "mirror" array, ANY change on drive 1 is replicated on drive 2. This means you have half the storage (1 drive is a exact copy of the other) but if one drive fails you don't lose any data. RAID 1 can expand up to any number of drives but EACH must have their own copy of all the data.

There are other types of RAID, namely 5 and 6 that reduce the amount of "wasted" space or increase fault-tolerance with in the array but RAID 0 is different.

RAID 0 technically isn't even RAID. It doesn't provide fault-tolerance at all. What RAID 0 does is "stripe" the data across 2 or more equally sized drives. Striping means that your data is evenly split across all your drives. I'm sure you can see how this runs counter to RAID's goals. If one drive goes you lose ALL you data as the data is spread across them all.

RAID 0's benefit is that since the data is spread across multiple drives the read and write load on each drive can be lessened and thereby give you more speed overall. Normally in a JBOD array (Just A Bunch of Discs, its how you have your drives now) each drive holds it own copy of data and THAT drive has to provide that data in whole, not in part. In a RAID 0, since the data is spread across all the drives 1 file requires data to be read from each drive increasing how fast it is read.

RAID 0 is basically a way to gain performance while getting a hit to reliability. RAID 1, 5, and 6 are about redundancy and take a hit to performance as a result. JBOD is the middle ground, decent on both but not good either.

If you want to configure your system to use RAID 0 you need 2 drives of the SAME size. Then you can get a read/write performance boost for the data stored on those drives.

You can even mix up RAID types and have RAID 10 and RAID 01 which have the benefits of both RAID 0 and RAID 1.

For more info: RAID
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March 24, 2014 8:14:50 PM

sparky8251 said:
I'm gonna give you a bit of background to better answer this.

RAID stands for "Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks" and was originally designed to use multiple ordinary drives together to provide fault-tolerance (drive failure protection). RAID 1 is a "mirror" array, ANY change on drive 1 is replicated on drive 2. This means you have half the storage (1 drive is a exact copy of the other) but if one drive fails you don't lose any data. RAID 1 can expand up to any number of drives but EACH must have their own copy of all the data.

There are other types of RAID, namely 5 and 6 that reduce the amount of "wasted" space or increase fault-tolerance with in the array but RAID 0 is different.

RAID 0 technically isn't even RAID. It doesn't provide fault-tolerance at all. What RAID 0 does is "stripe" the data across 2 or more equally sized drives. Striping means that your data is evenly split across all your drives. I'm sure you can see how this runs counter to RAID's goals. If one drive goes you lose ALL you data as the data is spread across them all.

RAID 0's benefit is that since the data is spread across multiple drives the read and write load on each drive can be lessened and thereby give you more speed overall. Normally in a JBOD array (Just A Bunch of Discs, its how you have your drives now) each drive holds it own copy of data and THAT drive has to provide that data in whole, not in part. In a RAID 0, since the data is spread across all the drives 1 file requires data to be read from each drive increasing how fast it is read.

RAID 0 is basically a way to gain performance while getting a hit to reliability. RAID 1, 5, and 6 are about redundancy and take a hit to performance as a result. JBOD is the middle ground, decent on both but not good either.

If you want to configure your system to use RAID 0 you need 2 drives of the SAME size. Then you can get a read/write performance boost for the data stored on those drives.

You can even mix up RAID types and have RAID 10 and RAID 01 which have the benefits of both RAID 0 and RAID 1.

For more info: RAID


Thanks!
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March 24, 2014 8:18:21 PM

No problem! Hope that helped.
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a b G Storage
March 24, 2014 8:18:40 PM

A perfect explanation to RAID however please keep in mind that redundant and backup are two totally different things. With any RAID configuration one should always plan for a backup of some sort. RAID will not protect you from accidental file deletion or a virus infection.
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