Building my first gaming computer, around 2500$, need lots of help

So I've been reading around this site for a few days and have decided to ask for help with this. I know almost nothing about computer hardware so I need a lot of help. What I want out of this computer is to be able to play any game on ultra settings with at least 60 fps on 1080p. I want a durable build, because I may end up having to move this computer from house to house every week(Parents are divorced). I intend on only playing on a single monitor. I also want to be able to record game play and edit it for youtube videos, so if someone could point me towards good recording and editing software, that would be helpful. The cost is flexible, so if an extra few hundred dollars would make a significant difference please tell me. I may upgrade in a few years, but I really need to get the parts and build the computer as soon as possible, so waiting for some of the new hardware ive heard about isn't a viable option. So yeah that's all I could really think of. If here are any key components that are necessary for you all to help please tell me and ill add them in.
Sorry if this was long but as I said, im pretty clueless when it comes to this stuff.

Edit: I would like a monitor and a decent keyboard. Again, I don't want to be cheap and sacrifice quality, so I don't mind if it ends up being closer to 3000$
69 answers Last reply
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  1. If you intend to move this rig a lot, I would suggest a mini-itx rig for easier hauling around. I will see what I can come up with.
  2. Here is a mini-itx build. I have an idea for a M-ATX too.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87E-ITX Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB mSATA Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.80 @ Mwave)
    Case: Cooler Master Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case ($55.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1972.68
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:38 EDT-0400)
  3. The M-ATX is a bit cheaper. Keep in mind, I can make both rigs cheaper if you are not interested in overclocking.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87M Extreme4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.80 @ Mwave)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1953.70
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:41 EDT-0400)
  4. I would recommend staying away from mini itx towers. They all seem to have overheating problems due to the fact that most of the parts are crammed in close proximity to each other. This will be compounded by the fact that the PC is going to be a heat producing gaming rig. Go with the mid level towers, as they have a much improved cooling ability. I think you can even find ones with handles if that suites your fancy.

    You also are wasting money on the 4770k. An i5 wold have been sufficient for gaming
    The ssd is a great idea hhd are super slow. I got a 512 GB adata but i think one would be fine with a 256GB, it would save a couple hundred dollars.
    And the most important thing is spend as much on the vid card as the budget allows. This is why I made the couple of recommendations on saving a few bucks. Dump those savings right back into a true beast of a card
  5. I left room for Monitor and possible upgrade. I am unsure if you need anything else.
  6. Monitor and a Titan Black, mini-ITX

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87E-ITX Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB mSATA Solid State Disk ($229.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan Black 6GB Video Card ($999.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Cooler Master Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case ($55.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2437.86
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:45 EDT-0400)
  7. commycharb said:
    I would recommend staying away from mini itx towers. They all seem to have overheating problems due to the fact that most of the parts are crammed in close proximity to each other. This will be compounded by the fact that the PC is going to be a heat producing gaming rig. Go with the mid level towers, as they have a much improved cooling ability. I think you can even find ones with handles if that suites your fancy.


    Coolermaster Elite 130 is a well done case and designed for high end hardware. ;)
  8. M-ATX with Titan Black and monitor.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87M Extreme4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan Black 6GB Video Card ($999.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2418.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:48 EDT-0400)
  9. logainofhades said:
    The M-ATX is a bit cheaper. Keep in mind, I can make both rigs cheaper if you are not interested in overclocking.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87M Extreme4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.80 @ Mwave)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1953.70
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:41 EDT-0400)


    logainofhades said:
    M-ATX with Titan Black and monitor.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87M Extreme4 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX Titan Black 6GB Video Card ($999.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Micro Center)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2418.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 15:48 EDT-0400)


    so how much of a heating problem will using a mini-itx or a m-tax create. I would rather have a better computer and keep it in a single location at the expense of loosing a significant amount of time with it. Also I am not too concerned with moving it if it is large. my concern is if it will get damaged if im consistently moving it once or twice a week on a relatively smooth ten minute car ride
  10. Either of those builds should be fine. I can change things up if you want a more full sized tower. I was just giving easier to handle builds.
  11. In games that support SLI, this would be faster.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($119.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2461.86
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:04 EDT-0400)
  12. logainofhades said:
    Either of those builds should be fine. I can change things up if you want a more full sized tower. I was just giving easier to handle builds.


    would a mid or full size tower be easier to upgrade in the future. I don't intend on doing so any time soon, but in a few years I may. Also again would a mid or full size tower be more susceptible to damage while moving it. That is my main concern.
  13. Mid or full can sometimes be awkward to carry and heavy. You could always just keep the box your case comes in and use it when you move your system to protect it. I keep mine for this reason.
  14. logainofhades said:
    Mid or full can sometimes be awkward to carry and heavy. You could always just keep the box your case comes in and use it when you move your system to protect it. I keep mine for this reason.


    so as long as I keep the box the case comes in ill be good on the protection? if that's true, then I would much rather have a mid or full size tower. other than spacing issues, why would a mid size tower be better than a full
  15. Yea, keep the plastic bag and the styrofoam, and you will be adequately protected. You can go full too. They are easier to work with. Here is a full tower build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($119.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2491.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:13 EDT-0400)
  16. I would not recommend a desktop for constant movement, especially high end. Your high end graphics cards are VERY heavy, and the moving around they do will in a car can be very damaging to them. Your budget is high enough that you could actually get a good gaming laptop, and that would be much safer to transport around regularly.

    OR you could build 2 $1200 computers, and keep one at each place, $1200 is still a very solid budget for a good gaming PC. $2400 is the overkill range for single (even dual) monitor setup, and unless you're using your computer to generate money you might feel better with the money you saved.

    And you might have better bragging rights getting to say you have 2 balla computers instead of just one.
  17. James Mason said:
    I would not recommend a desktop for constant movement, especially high end. Your high end graphics cards are VERY heavy, and the moving around they do will in a car can be very damaging to them. Your budget is high enough that you could actually get a good gaming laptop, and that would be much safer to transport around regularly.

    OR you could build 2 $1200 computers, and keep one at each place, $1200 is still a very solid budget for a good gaming PC. $2400 is the overkill range for single (even dual) monitor setup, and unless you're using your computer to generate money you might feel better with the money you saved.

    And you might have better bragging rights getting to say you have 2 balla computers instead of just one.


    Have to say that is a good idea, really. Never really thought about it. :lol:
  18. logainofhades said:
    Yea, keep the plastic bag and the styrofoam, and you will be adequately protected. You can go full too. They are easier to work with. Here is a full tower build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($119.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2491.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:13 EDT-0400)


    James Mason said:
    I would not recommend a desktop for constant movement, especially high end. Your high end graphics cards are VERY heavy, and the moving around they do will in a car can be very damaging to them. Your budget is high enough that you could actually get a good gaming laptop, and that would be much safer to transport around regularly.

    OR you could build 2 $1200 computers, and keep one at each place, $1200 is still a very solid budget for a good gaming PC. $2400 is the overkill range for single (even dual) monitor setup, and unless you're using your computer to generate money you might feel better with the money you saved.

    And you might have better bragging rights getting to say you have 2 balla computers instead of just one.


    I had considered building 2 computers, but because of my funding coming out of my college funds(I have enough to spare significantly more that 3000$ on this, but there really is no need. The problem is that I wont be able to convince my grandparents who are in charge of the funds to allow me to get 2 computers of this quality. Part of the reason im doing this is because Im going to major in comp sci. ive taken it all 3 years of high school so far and feel that its important to understand the computers hardware as well as the software and ability to code. I want to build it for the experience and then I will be able to use it in college and upgrade it later down the road.

    And are there games out there that aren't capable of using sli?
  19. Get 2 of these basically, assuming you play alot of steam games, you can easily just download your library on both machines, or if its bf4 or titanfall, it's tied to your account so it doesnt matter where you play it from as long as your account has the associated CDkey. This doesnt include a mouse/keyboard/headset, BUT those you can transport around with you between houses with little to no worry about them being damaged:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($82.99 @ Mwave)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($18.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VX228H 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($129.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1203.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:29 EDT-0400)
  20. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4440 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor ($179.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper TX3 54.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($20.38 @ NCIX US)
    Motherboard: ASRock B85 Pro4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial M500 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.81 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card ($364.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($59.67 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Samsung S23C200B 23.0" Monitor ($149.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1249.77
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:32 EDT-0400)
  21. nukesrntbad said:

    I had considered building 2 computers, but because of my funding coming out of my college funds(I have enough to spare significantly more that 3000$ on this, but there really is no need. The problem is that I wont be able to convince my grandparents who are in charge of the funds to allow me to get 2 computers of this quality. Part of the reason im doing this is because Im going to major in comp sci. ive taken it all 3 years of high school so far and feel that its important to understand the computers hardware as well as the software and ability to code. I want to build it for the experience and then I will be able to use it in college and upgrade it later down the road.

    And are there games out there that aren't capable of using sli?


    Haha, yeah one of the girls I work with has a computer science degree from a major university, but she doesn't know about how computers actually work/what the parts are/do, so don't expect to learn that in college.

    Building two computers would be double the experience :P

    But this a good custom laptop manufacturer, you can get dual GPU laptops: http://www.xoticpc.com/custom-gaming-laptops-notebooks-gaming-laptops-ct-118_96_98.html

    I knew a person who was technically homeless, but still a serious gamer and spent like $2.6k on a gaming laptop, because well, they couldn't work with a whole desktop setup.

    And while a bit old, Newegg has a really good video series on building computers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPIXAtNGGCw
    Especially when you consider they're the most reputable online electronics hardware, you can trust them, and there are plenty of articles on Tom's as well about building PCs I'm sure.
  22. James Mason said:
    Get 2 of these basically, assuming you play alot of steam games, you can easily just download your library on both machines, or if its bf4 or titanfall, it's tied to your account so it doesnt matter where you play it from as long as your account has the associated CDkey. This doesnt include a mouse/keyboard/headset, BUT those you can transport around with you between houses with little to no worry about them being damaged:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($82.99 @ Mwave)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($18.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VX228H 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($129.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1203.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:29 EDT-0400)


    and would I be able to build a gaming laptop with minimal knowledge of doing so. I have a few people in my family who might be able to, but I don't want to make this an exceedingly difficult task. also would it be easy to upgrade a laptop In the future?
  23. nukesrntbad said:
    James Mason said:
    Get 2 of these basically, assuming you play alot of steam games, you can easily just download your library on both machines, or if its bf4 or titanfall, it's tied to your account so it doesnt matter where you play it from as long as your account has the associated CDkey. This doesnt include a mouse/keyboard/headset, BUT those you can transport around with you between houses with little to no worry about them being damaged:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($234.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($33.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($319.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($82.99 @ Mwave)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($18.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VX228H 60Hz 21.5" Monitor ($129.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1203.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:29 EDT-0400)


    and would I be able to build a gaming laptop with minimal knowledge of doing so. I have a few people in my family who might be able to, but I don't want to make this an exceedingly difficult task. also would it be easy to upgrade a laptop In the future?


    No you can't custom build a laptop, they are designed to have extremely limited expandibility at best, usually only a 2nd hard drive or more ram, they all have tons of custom built parts, like motherboards and cases and screens ect.
  24. You can get barebones laptops to customize what you want, but they are kinda pricey, last I knew.
  25. logainofhades said:
    You can get barebones laptops to customize what you want, but they are kinda pricey, last I knew.


    I'd be curious to see one of those.
  26. James Mason said:
    logainofhades said:
    You can get barebones laptops to customize what you want, but they are kinda pricey, last I knew.


    I'd be curious to see one of those.


    yeah so I watched that newegg video you gave me the link for(it was excellent for someone like me) and the only problem I noticed was the prices for some of the graphics cards were pretty outdated. I think im pretty set on building my own computer, so as you said, a laptop wont help to accomplish this as much. any good gaming keyboards that you could point me towards and also if youre knowledgeable on the topic, what is a good editing and recording software that I could use to record game play and to make youtube videos with
  27. Right, the videos are more of "general putting a computer together" the prices and parts aren't what's important because there are new pc parts every week and prices change a lot over time. There are also PLENTY of newer videos on youtube about specific modern builds and about specific parts ect. Keyboard wise, you'd want a "mechanical"wired keyboard, as they have better response and feel better when using, but are more expensive. This is probably an informative article to get you thinking about what you want/need: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2415290,00.asp

    However, I'm less of an advocate of gaming keyboards as more in favor of ergonomic keyboards and mice. You're going to be using your mouse and keyboard alot, so having ones that are comfortable to use for extended periods of time (4+ hours) is important, and it helps reduce the risk for Carpel Tunnel Syndrome down the line... somewhat.
    Gaming Keyboards and Mice are considered as such because they have extra buttons that you can more easily program macros into. (a series of keypresses like chaining a series of spells or a skill combo together in WoW, ect.)

    Personally I LOVE my Logitech Performance MX mouse: http://www.logitech.com/en-us/product/performance-mouse-mx?crid=7
    It has a few extra buttons that can be used to map some ingame keys to. (Like like laugh and taunt. "Do you always fight so poorly?") It feels REALLY nice in the hand, and I can use it on any surface. (My desk is solid white, normally laser mice can't work on white or clear surfaces, this mouse does)

    And I have a gaming keyboard from logitech as well that is a mix between this one: http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/g105-gaming-keyboard and this one: http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/g19s-lcd-gaming-keyboard (I have more programmable keys, but no LCD screen on my keyboard)

    Lots of people would recommend a Razer Naga for a gaming mouse, but those look really uncomfortable in the hand to me, but they have better programmable buttons.
  28. Right, the videos are more of "general putting a computer together" the prices and parts aren't what's important because there are new pc parts every week and prices change a lot over time. There are also PLENTY of newer videos on youtube about specific modern builds and about specific parts ect. Keyboard wise, you'd want a "mechanical"wired keyboard, as they have better response and feel better when using, but are more expensive. This is probably an informative article to get you thinking about what you want/need: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2415290,00.asp

    However, I'm less of an advocate of gaming keyboards as more in favor of ergonomic keyboards and mice. You're going to be using your mouse and keyboard alot, so having ones that are comfortable to use for extended periods of time (4+ hours) is important, and it helps reduce the risk for Carpel Tunnel Syndrome down the line... somewhat.
    Gaming Keyboards and Mice are considered as such because they have extra buttons that you can more easily program macros into. (a series of keypresses like chaining a series of spells or a skill combo together in WoW, ect.)

    Personally I LOVE my Logitech Performance MX mouse: http://www.logitech.com/en-us/product/performance-mouse-mx?crid=7
    It has a few extra buttons that can be used to map some ingame keys to. (Like like laugh and taunt. "Do you always fight so poorly?") It feels REALLY nice in the hand, and I can use it on any surface. (My desk is solid white, normally laser mice can't work on white or clear surfaces, this mouse does)

    And I have a gaming keyboard from logitech as well that is a mix between this one: http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/g105-gaming-keyboard and this one: http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/g19s-lcd-gaming-keyboard (I have more programmable keys, but no LCD screen on my keyboard)

    Lots of people would recommend a Razer Naga for a gaming mouse, but those look really uncomfortable in the hand to me, but they have better programmable buttons.
    [/quotem
    Agree with the necessity for comfort. Sometimes Ill play games a good 8-10 hours straight on xbox(usually cod zombies or the sort of game where taking a break isn't really an option) but I don't want my hands or wrists to hurt. I will primarily play games I download off of steam, such as bf4, 7daystodie, I enjoy tf2. I also play minecraft and intend on playing crisis 3 and the next elder scrolls game whenever it comes out. These are just the main games, but I will probably add many others to my collection. Anyways I took a look at the mouse. It seems very nice, but when I put my hand in the approximate shape of the mouse, it caused pain in my hand. Id probably prefer a mouse that has a grip similar to that of a handle on an xbox controller. I can play for very extended periods of time with no discomfort. I haven't looked at the keyboards yet, but I will do a little research and get back to you
  29. All of the above suggestions are great. But do you need a monitor included with your price? Also a titan performs only 12 percent better than the gtx 780 ti for an extra 500 bucks that's not worth it. Get a micro atx mobo and a case with SLI compatibility and SLI 2x gtx 780 ti.

    If your still hellbent on a super compact PC here's one for 1500 dollars, but if you don't mind the transport definitely go for a micro atx rather than a mini itx and SLI or take this one if you want and save some cash.

    http://uk.pcpartpicker.com/p/3hnwc
  30. You do realize you did that in £ not $ right? :lol: Though, I must admit, I like that case. It has me rethinking my own mini-itx build I want to do someday.
  31. logainofhades said:
    You do realize you did that in £ not $ right? :lol: Though, I must admit, I like that case. It has me rethinking my own mini-itx build I want to do someday.
    Oh hahahaha lol I totally didn't see that, crap switching to dollars... Aaaaand 1936$.
  32. Sorry for false info nukesrntbad.
  33. logainofhades said:
    In games that support SLI, this would be faster.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($119.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2461.86
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:04 EDT-0400)


    logainofhades said:
    Yea, keep the plastic bag and the styrofoam, and you will be adequately protected. You can go full too. They are easier to work with. Here is a full tower build.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($79.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($227.00 @ B&H)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($488.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($119.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($53.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($154.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $2491.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-25 16:13 EDT-0400)




    I like this design the best. I really want a full or mid size tower. My only concern is the liquid cooler. I have heard from a few people that they are a pain to maintain. Since I don't know much about them, how often would I need to replace the water. I read every 6 months is good, but people make it out to be so much of a pain to do. I hate when my computer overheats, so I certainly want to do liquid cooling though. Also, could you include come coolant in the price(I believe you add something to the distilled water but not exactly sure)
  34. also does the NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case come in any other colors. id really like a color other than black/white/grey but I still want it to have the transparent side
  35. so heres what I think im gonna get. Im gonna need a mic so if anyone knows of a decent brand/type for gaming if it really matters it would be helpful
  36. nukesrntbad said:
    so heres what I think im gonna get. Im gonna need a mic so if anyone knows of a decent brand/type for gaming if it really matters it would be helpful
    Honestly I really wouldn't trust Zotac for their GPUs here in India they have terrible service parts missing impending failures and worst of all their warranty just watch out for them. I strongly suggest going with either: ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI,EVGA. But Asus and EVGA would be first on list. A few people told me that Zotac is unreliable then I went to see a friend who bought the Zotac GTX 660 for only 11k inr and screws and brackets were missing in the box, no anti static plastic and the sides were bent. So he called them up and asked for RMA since it obviously didn't work, and they made him pay extra for delivery and other charges.
  37. That is weird, I have had Zotac boards and never had an issue. I had a pair of GT 240 that I got used from a friend, and they are still going strong. A friend of mine has one, and my nephew's father in law has the other till he can get the money for a GTX 750ti. I folded on them non stop for months and they see regular WoW time now. I had an MSI one, and the fan fell apart.
  38. logainofhades said:
    That is weird, I have had Zotac boards and never had an issue. I had a pair of GT 240 that I got used from a friend, and they are still going strong. A friend of mine has one, and my nephew's father in law has the other till he can get the money for a GTX 750ti. I folded on them non stop for months and they see regular WoW time now. I had an MSI one, and the fan fell apart.


    so if I got the ASUS gtx 780s would they be compatible with this build and would they work efficiently with it?
  39. Yes they would.
  40. James Mason said:
    Yes they would.


    alright then I see no reason to not use the asus, even if they are slightly more expensive. I will look into finding out if the zotac ones aren't as reliable but for now I will just go asus. Also, can the case be found in other colors. I could only find the black one for the exact style. I saw some others that seemed similar in other colors, but I wasn't sure if they would be the same. heres what I have so far

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3hWUC
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3hWUC/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3hWUC/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($324.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($515.19 @ B&H)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($515.19 @ B&H)
    Case: NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($68.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($84.98 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($177.58 @ Newegg)
    Keyboard: Logitech G510s Wired Gaming Keyboard ($79.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Logitech G602 Wireless Optical Mouse ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $2677.80
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-28 11:58 EDT-0400)

    Also whats the difference between

    Asus GTX780-3GD5 GeForce GTX 780 3GB 863MHz
    $699.99
    Asus GTX780-DC2OC-3GD5 GeForce GTX 780 3GB 889MHz
    $515.1

    why is the first so much more expensive than the second
  41. I would have to probably say that is a supply and demand inflated price.
  42. logainofhades said:
    I would have to probably say that is a supply and demand inflated price.


    Alright then I will go with the cheaper of the 2. Also any ideas about the case. I really don't want a black/white case
  43. THAT case only comes in black.
    Most people actually want black cases, as they dont stand out or look garish like a lot of colored cases can. The black also makes any LEDs they have standout more.
    But there are cases that have different colors, they usually carry a slightly higher price tag though:
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/enermax-case-eca3310br
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-c70militarygreen
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/thermaltake-case-vp300a5w2n
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-cc9011038ww
    You didnt say what color you wanted.
  44. This is m suggestion: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3i08F
    US$2191.18
  45. James Mason said:
    THAT case only comes in black.
    Most people actually want black cases, as they dont stand out or look garish like a lot of colored cases can. The black also makes any LEDs they have standout more.
    But there are cases that have different colors, they usually carry a slightly higher price tag though:
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/enermax-case-eca3310br
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-c70militarygreen
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/thermaltake-case-vp300a5w2n
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-case-cc9011038ww
    You didnt say what color you wanted.


    I think I like red the best. I noticed that the first case on your list was red, but I also saw it was a mid tower, and I wanted a full tower. do you know of any full towers that are red and would be compatible with my build. Also o be a little more specific, I would also like a clear side so I can look at the hardware and what not
  46. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146107
    :p
    Or this:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146066
    I think the only difference is the first one has a more glossy finish?
    Full tower cases are really big though, and are pretty awkward to carry. When transporting them though, make sure you lay them down on their sides and secure them so they aren't sliding around the trunk/backseat.

    And some people spray paint their own PC cases to get the color they want.
    Colors fall in and out of style, but black is always a classic.
  47. James Mason said:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146107
    :p
    Or this:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146066
    I think the only difference is the first one has a more glossy finish?
    Full tower cases are really big though, and are pretty awkward to carry. When transporting them though, make sure you lay them down on their sides and secure them so they aren't sliding around the trunk/backseat.

    And some people spray paint their own PC cases to get the color they want.
    Colors fall in and out of style, but black is always a classic.


    So a few questions ive been asked and that I need to know before I get the stuff. Could i use more fans or something instead of a liquid cooling system. it would require less maintenance and i have no idea how to clean out a liquid cooling system anyways. Also why are the dual 780s better than a single more expensive card. also why do i need
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    both of those. My moms boyfriend is curious about these things(he's going to help me build it. He has a decent understanding of the hardware, but has a degree in comp software and isn't familiar with gaming computers) and thanks for all the help so far. I really appreciate it. BTW im gonna go with the NZXT 530 phantom red case. It looks awesome
  48. My building suggest only one cooling system that don't require often maintance, and you can also install other 3 120mm fans (side, front and back). Plus, it has a 120GB SSD (Kingston) dedicated to your OS and games, by this way you save some money. All other stuff like photos, documents and backup you can store in the HDD (Seagate).
    A dual-SLI is better than an expensive card because it will work 2 GPU's simultaneously.
  49. so what type of cooling do you suggest i use instead of the liquid cooler i have listed on here

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3i3H3
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3i3H3/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3i3H3/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($324.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120XL 86.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Micro Center)
    Memory: A-Data XPG V1.0 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($129.99 @ TigerDirect)
    Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($515.19 @ B&H)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($515.19 @ B&H)
    Case: NZXT Source 530 ATX Full Tower Case ($99.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($68.98 @ Newegg)
    Monitor: Asus VN248H 23.8" Monitor ($177.58 @ Newegg)
    Keyboard: Logitech G510s Wired Gaming Keyboard ($79.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Logitech G602 Wireless Optical Mouse ($57.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $2592.82
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-03-28 15:54 EDT-0400)
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