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Upgraded GPU & PSU but now System crashes During Games

Tags:
  • Dell Studio Xps
  • Games
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 26, 2014 2:00:17 AM

I have a Dell xps Studio 8100 that has had absolutely no issues running games (Skyrim, CIV V and even ESO Beta). With the ESO launching this weekend for early access I decided to upgrade my video card from a Nvidia 220 to the GeForce 750ti so I could get MUCH better graphics. I knew I would need a new PSU so I upgraded my 350 to a Corsair 650. Installation went just fine and the computer is up and running...but...If I attempt to play Skyrim or even CIV, it crashes almost immediately.

I ran the MSI Kombuster utility and it did okay (didn't crash) on a few of the tests and then on some of them the screen would freeze with strange shadowed squares all over it and then power off the whole system. I'm wondering if the GPU is overclocking too much? I don't know anything about overclocking and didn't realize the card was "Superclocked".

I'm not really sure what happened but I want my computer back up and stable for ESO this weekend!!

My CPU is an Intel corei5 650 and 3.2GHz with 8 Gb of RAM.
What mistake did I make and is it correctable???

More about : upgraded gpu psu system crashes games

March 26, 2014 2:23:56 AM

Install latest drivers from Nvidia. If that doesn't help, uninstall and then re-install a game(let's say skyrim) and try to play it again.

EDIT: The thing about factory overclocked cards (like the "superclocked") is that they are guaranteed to work at those clocks, but if you overclocked a reference card yourself, it's not guaranteed to go so high and you will probably void your warranty. This means that as long as you haven't overclocked it yourself, it should work and can be returned for a replacement if it doesn't.

EDIT 2: Don't forget to check your GPU's temperatures using something like HWMonitor or MSI afterburner.
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March 26, 2014 7:34:41 AM

Eduello said:
Install latest drivers from Nvidia. If that doesn't help, uninstall and then re-install a game(let's say skyrim) and try to play it again.

EDIT: The thing about factory overclocked cards (like the "superclocked") is that they are guaranteed to work at those clocks, but if you overclocked a reference card yourself, it's not guaranteed to go so high and you will probably void your warranty. This means that as long as you haven't overclocked it yourself, it should work and can be returned for a replacement if it doesn't.

EDIT 2: Don't forget to check your GPU's temperatures using something like HWMonitor or MSI afterburner.


I did install the latest drivers and then re-installed them again just to be sure. I was able to play CIV again if I took the graphics settings all the way down to what they were with the 220 card. I still couldn't play Skyrim. I did try monitoring the GPU temperatures using MSI Afterburner but I'm not sure what I'd really be looking for. The warmest it got when it failed one of the benchmark tests was 50.

I haven't changed the clocking on piece of hardware on the system but I had read somewhere in one of these forums that an overclocked card such as a GPU could cause a problem if the CPU couldn't handle it. I used MSI Afterburner to slide the clock speed down (although I don't know what it was initially before I moved it). That did enable it to go through a few more benchmark tests without freezing and blacking out the system.
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March 26, 2014 7:51:56 AM

Try to borrow an alternative PSU from friends/family and see if it works. If not, the fault is probably in the card since your previous card worked with this system. If it does work, you've got a faulty PSU. Return the faulty part for replacement.
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March 28, 2014 3:22:38 PM

Are there any additional power connections required? I know a lot of motherboards will provide an auxiliary power connector for the motherboard that will add additional power to the PCIE bus. Your card may be pulling too much power for your motherboard to supply through the PCIE bus. Remember, video cards get power from the PCIE bus as well as from the additional 6 & 8 pin PCIE cables from the power supply.
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