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Broken HDD Sata connector

Last response: in Storage
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March 26, 2014 9:11:00 AM

Hello,

I'm having a problem with my HDD. The Sata connector is broken, and so my question is how can i repair this? can i even repair it?
I've seen alot of video's about how to solve it, but i don't really trust it.
Can you help me?

Here an example: http://gyazo.com/5980603e6f9130be8afcfaed9e7904c8

Best solution

March 26, 2014 9:24:14 AM

This can be fixed - but you might not like the solution. Then again you just might.

If I am seeing the issue correctly - the plastic housing around the pins got themselves missing somehow. That causes the cable to slip if you were to try and connect it - creating an unstable connection.

My solution would be to create a permanant connection by glueing the connector to HDD. I would use something along the line of gorilla glue.

Simply connect the cable, tape the cable secure to the HDD. Then apply the glue around the cable connection.

Please keep in mind - this is not a durable solution - and you may want to simply migrate your data to another drive for the long haul.

I hope this helps.
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March 26, 2014 10:58:36 AM

So, the best solution is to just buy a new hdd?
There is no data on it anyways (except an OS)

I'm not really a fan of glueing shit in my case. But i can atleast try.
Its a brand new pc so i dont want any electrical issues going on while its on.
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March 26, 2014 1:29:12 PM

If it is only the power connector that is damaged, then you could hardwire a legacy Molex connector by soldering it to the pins on the PCB.
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March 27, 2014 8:28:49 AM

Tuze said:
So, the best solution is to just buy a new hdd?
There is no data on it anyways (except an OS)

I'm not really a fan of glueing shit in my case. But i can atleast try.
Its a brand new pc so i dont want any electrical issues going on while its on.


If it has not data - then no fix is needed. Like I mentioned, you may not like the soltion - and it is not durable. But it would have allowed you to make it work if there was something useful on it.
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March 27, 2014 1:56:59 PM

I have used a hot glue gun but if I had the same problem now, I would use clear RTV from an auto parts store. There is some debate about the fumes, while the stuff is curing, can maybe damage electronic parts but I don't think that would happen with just the connector. I was going to use it to affix two copper wire coil inductors (speaker crossover build) and they said no because the inductor coil wire has a very thin layer of clear varnish to keep each from actually touching each other. The regular RTV curing chemicals would likely eat through that varnish layer of the inductor's wire. There is an RTV for electronics but it is very hard to find so I ziptied the inductors down for now. Good luck. Oh, and the RTV can be removed relatively easily if need be.
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May 11, 2014 6:12:35 PM

I tried something that is a good temporary solution. I got some black gorilla tape, broke off the plastic tab on another drive that I didn't need anymore, poked the plastic tab up in the cable, then gently connected it back to the drive. Then I took the black gorilla tape, and taped both the data and the power cable together to the top and bottom of the drive. Works like a charm until I get the time/energy to migrate the data to a different drive.
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