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I'm having trouble starting my computer; New PC Build

Last response: in Motherboards
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March 26, 2014 5:26:12 PM

I'm having problems with my current set up. I've never built a computer, but I have experience with electronics and equipment, so I'm aware of the basic precautions such as anti-static wrist wraps, assuming wires are always live, etc. I've also been exposed to computer parts and electronics my entire life, so I'd like to say I have enough knowledge to be able to execute a build.
Anyways, my current problem is that whenever I try to start up my computer, the GPU will turn on, the processor fan will speed up, the motherboard LED will light up, but my TV screen will shut off instead of show a splash screen. I first tried with an old monitor, and thought the reason it shut off was because it was faulty.
I've tried switching around the connections on my motherboard, but I've had no luck. There was also a point where I used the VGA cable on the GPU HDMI adapter instead of the motherboard, and I got a message that said "Please power down and connect the PCI Express connector to the graphics card"
I have an Asus H87M-E micro ATX motherboard, and I'm starting to think the motherboard came defective. Could anybody save me the hassle of contacting amazon and give me a remedy that might fix this problem? Or even address what the problem might be? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Parts:
Asus H87M-E Micro ATX Motherboard
EVGA nvidia SuperClocked GeForce GTX 770 Graphics Card
Corsair Vengeance 8g RAM (2 sticks of 4g)
Corsair RM Series 750W Power Supply
Kingston 120GB SSD
Western Digital 640g HDD
Intel i5 4670k quad core 3.4MHz processor
a c 109 V Motherboard
March 26, 2014 5:32:04 PM

To test your theory on the motherboard, remove the GPU, and then boot up with the VGA cable. Most, if not all, BIOS/UEFI settings are [Auto], when it comes to display selection. Basically this means that the display selected will always auto select, based upon what is detected. Since the GPU is installed, the display will come from the GPU. In the absence of a GPU, the display will come from the VGA/DVI/HDMI port on the motherboard.
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March 26, 2014 5:42:11 PM

T_T said:
To test your theory on the motherboard, remove the GPU, and then boot up with the VGA cable. Most, if not all, BIOS/UEFI settings are [Auto], when it comes to display selection. Basically this means that the display selected will always auto select, based upon what is detected. Since the GPU is installed, the display will come from the GPU. In the absence of a GPU, the display will come from the VGA/DVI/HDMI port on the motherboard.

Thanks! I'll be sure to test this ASAP and share my results!
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March 26, 2014 5:43:37 PM

Your Graphics card requires a second power source, hence the message "Please power down and connect the PCI Express connector to the graphics card"
Look at the card top you will see open connectors, your card came with adaptor cables to make it possibly to meet the requirements "An available 6-pin PCI-E power connector and an available 8 pin PCI-E power connector" (from site)
Your Integrated Graphics Processor would probably be disabled when the presence of a Graphics Card is detected so you need to connect to the graphics card for video.
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March 26, 2014 6:08:12 PM

rwinches said:
Your Graphics card requires a second power source, hence the message "Please power down and connect the PCI Express connector to the graphics card"
Look at the card top you will see open connectors, your card came with adaptor cables to make it possibly to meet the requirements "An available 6-pin PCI-E power connector and an available 8 pin PCI-E power connector" (from site)
Your Integrated Graphics Processor would probably be disabled when the presence of a Graphics Card is detected so you need to connect to the graphics card for video.


The top came with an 8-pin and a 6-pin female pin slot. Since the power supply I got was modular, I was provided with 2 of the PCI Express Connectors. Each came in one piece, but with 4 strands of connectors if that makes sense. I could only hook up 3 out of the 4 (two 6 pins and one 2 pin). Could the extra two pin male connector have anything to do with the problem? Maybe it provides another purpose I haven't acknowledged?
Thanks btw!
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a c 109 V Motherboard
March 26, 2014 6:53:45 PM

The bottom line is that you have to satisfy the sockets on the card.

The 6-pin adaptor that came with the GPU are for using the standard 4-pin PSU molex connectors (the same that could power up your hard drives, and such) in the absence of dedicated GPU plugs. The 8-pin adaptor is for PSUs that only have 6-pin connectors. Your GPU requires 1 8-pin and 1 6-pin to power it up.

Your modular PSU allows you to use either 2 x 6-pin, 2 x 8-pin, or a combination of both. Sounds like you have the PSU connected properly, so if you're not getting power to the GPU, either:

1. Your PSU isn't supplying enough power; or
2. You haven't plugged in the modular cables correctly; or
3. your GPU is DOA.
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March 26, 2014 6:58:53 PM

Well, if you connected one six pin plug to the six pin socket and the other six pin plus the two pin to the eight pin socket that should be correct, except you got an <error> (that claims that the extra power is not connected), so my guess is, the six pin plus two pin plugs are connected wrong. like you connected the two then the six or the six then the two on the eight pin socket. (I would think that the plugs are made so this would not be possible though.) So, make sure the connections are pushed in all the way on the card and the PS.
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March 26, 2014 10:20:05 PM

It works now! My PCI Express cable wasn't connected in the 6x2 slot like it was supposed to be. Everything works fine now. Thank you rwinches and T_T for the help!
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