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[ Power Supply Scare ] Help Please

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  • Components
  • Power Supplies
  • Cases
  • Corsair
Last response: in Components
March 26, 2014 9:05:40 PM

Greetings, I have the Corsair Carbide Series 300R Black Steel Tower Case, but as my old PSU died, I need a new one. I was originally using a 600w power supply, but now that I have a new GPU (Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 I need a stronger power supply.

However, as I'm browsing for new PSU's, I cannot find a PSU that can fit in my case? The problem is that there is a black bar that sits on top of the PSU to keep it in position. I have it fully raised to its max capacity of 3.3 Inches.

I'm struggling to find a power supply unit that can fit inside this case, am I missing something here? Did Corsair really put out a case that cannot support a 750w power supply? Or am I just going about this the wrong way?

Here's a link to the case:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

More about : power supply scare

a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 9:10:01 PM

Your current 600 watt power supply should be sufficient for any current model graphics card.

-Wolf sends
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March 26, 2014 9:11:47 PM

Wolfshadw said:
Your current 600 watt power supply should be sufficient for any current model graphics card.

-Wolf sends


Yes, but I stated, my old PSU died, so might as well upgrade to be more future proof for when I get a better card
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a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 9:18:58 PM

Apologies. I missed that. Your case will accept any standard ATX12V power supply which will range anywhere between 180 and 1600 watts. One of the more common 650-850watt power supplies from a reliable manufacturer (Antec, Seasonic, Corsair, PC Power and Cooling, FSP Group) will more than suffice for your needs.

-Wolf sends
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a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 9:19:14 PM

That's incorrect. A good 600w power supply is plenty for a system with even a 780 - on nvidia's product page, they recommend a 600w PSU for a system with that card, AND that's presuming you buy a power supply shaped object that won't actually produce the wattage it claims to.

There's absolutely no need to get a 750w power supply UNLESS you anticipate running two cards at once in the future.


EDIT: Also, wolf, just as a side note... there is no such thing as a standard size for an ATX psu.. or rather there is and no power supply manufacturer follows it. Most PSUs 550w and above are significantly longer, and many of them also are taller or slightly wider.
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March 26, 2014 9:26:07 PM

DarkSable said:
That's incorrect. A good 600w power supply is plenty for a system with even a 780 - on nvidia's product page, they recommend a 600w PSU for a system with that card, AND that's presuming you buy a power supply shaped object that won't actually produce the wattage it claims to.

There's absolutely no need to get a 750w power supply UNLESS you anticipate running two cards at once in the future.


EDIT: Also, wolf, just as a side note... there is no such thing as a standard size for an ATX psu.. or rather there is and no power supply manufacturer follows it. Most PSUs 550w and above are significantly longer, and many of them also are taller or slightly wider.


Being so, I have two final questions, do you think the case never intended to have a 750w power supply and if I do get a 600w or 650w PSU, is there one that you might recommend? Because I'm really a novice when it comes to PSU's.
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a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 9:31:47 PM

As for what the case can fit, I honestly don't know - I would say it was just probably not entirely well thought out. You can always remove that lip if you need to - I don't see why it has to be there. There may well also be higher wattage power supplies that are still within that size, but they're most likely much lower quality.

And yes, absolutely! I recommend one of these guys. Those are power supplies that are all modular or semi-modular, are 80+ Bronze or better, and are made by reliable manufacturers.

Remember that a good 550w power supply will be PLENTY for a system with a 760, and a 770, and could even pull a rig with a 780 most likely. Also remember that future cards will require LESS power, not more. That means an upgrade in the future, even if it's to something just under a dual-chip card (i.e. everything but the #90 cards), will more than likely work just fine with a 550w or 600w power supply.

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March 26, 2014 9:37:42 PM

DarkSable said:
As for what the case can fit, I honestly don't know - I would say it was just probably not entirely well thought out. You can always remove that lip if you need to - I don't see why it has to be there. There may well also be higher wattage power supplies that are still within that size, but they're most likely much lower quality.

And yes, absolutely! I recommend one of these guys. Those are power supplies that are all modular or semi-modular, are 80+ Bronze or better, and are made by reliable manufacturers.

Remember that a good 550w power supply will be PLENTY for a system with a 760, and a 770, and could even pull a rig with a 780 most likely. Also remember that future cards will require LESS power, not more. That means an upgrade in the future, even if it's to something just under a dual-chip card (i.e. everything but the #90 cards), will more than likely work just fine with a 550w or 600w power supply.



Okay, and as for specifications, you think a 650w PSU would be sufficient? Here they are:

Mobo: ASUS Z87-DELUXE LGA 1150 Intel Z87 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Processor: Intel 4670k
GPU: GTX 760
RAM: 8gb DDR3
Storage: 1tb HDD
Usage of 9 USB ports
Usage of 'On Board' WiFi
Three 120m Fans

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a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 9:45:31 PM

No. I know for a fact that a 550w power supply, if it's from a good manufacturer, will easily handle that system. It would still easily handle that system if it were overclocked and had a gtx 770 in it...

I know that because I have an overclocked gtx 680(ish) and i5-3570k that have run with a 550w power supply with no issues, and they're less efficient parts.

Just throwing out there, none of your motherboard, ram, storage, peripherals, fans, or anything like that is going to matter whatsoever unless you're doing something absurd. Generally you allocate 100w to all that stuff plus a little safety, and then throw in your processor, graphics card, and overclocking of each. So with a GTX 770, i5-3470k, both overclocked, you take 100w (base) and add the graphics card (230w stock, round to 300w overclocked) and processor (85w rounded to 150w), which gives you 550w. Now, that's pushing a 550w power supply a little, but two things to note - first, a very good power supply will actually be able to sustain a load that's HIGHER than it's rated for, sometimes even for extended periods of time... and two, that is a theoretical maximum which the parts are never going to draw.
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March 26, 2014 10:04:51 PM

DarkSable said:
No. I know for a fact that a 550w power supply, if it's from a good manufacturer, will easily handle that system. It would still easily handle that system if it were overclocked and had a gtx 770 in it...

I know that because I have an overclocked gtx 680(ish) and i5-3570k that have run with a 550w power supply with no issues, and they're less efficient parts.

Just throwing out there, none of your motherboard, ram, storage, peripherals, fans, or anything like that is going to matter whatsoever unless you're doing something absurd. Generally you allocate 100w to all that stuff plus a little safety, and then throw in your processor, graphics card, and overclocking of each. So with a GTX 770, i5-3470k, both overclocked, you take 100w (base) and add the graphics card (230w stock, round to 300w overclocked) and processor (85w rounded to 150w), which gives you 550w. Now, that's pushing a 550w power supply a little, but two things to note - first, a very good power supply will actually be able to sustain a load that's HIGHER than it's rated for, sometimes even for extended periods of time... and two, that is a theoretical maximum which the parts are never going to draw.


Thank, and one final question before I pick a solution, how do I read the dimensions displayed for a PSU, for example, the dimensions of my PSU are 5.5" x 5.9" x 3.3" Is the middle number the height or what?

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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
March 26, 2014 10:12:12 PM

Unfortunately, there is no standard way of telling that... except you can know for sure that the smallest number is the height (usually 3. something), and the longest number is USUALLY the length.

That being said, that only applies to ATX power supplies - other form factors have totally different dimensions.
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March 26, 2014 10:35:45 PM

DarkSable said:
Unfortunately, there is no standard way of telling that... except you can know for sure that the smallest number is the height (usually 3. something), and the longest number is USUALLY the length.

That being said, that only applies to ATX power supplies - other form factors have totally different dimensions.


What kind of sick bastard from Corsair made this case only go up to a height of 3.375 for PSUs? Some kind of sick joke? Most PSU's are 3.4
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a b ) Power supply
March 27, 2014 9:29:15 PM

Haha, I really don't know. That does seem kind of odd. There's no catch or screw or anything anywhere?

It seems like that's the kinda issue that you would hear about, a lot...
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