Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Two routers on one line

Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
March 27, 2014 8:02:40 AM

Hi,
I know there are a few similar questions that have been answered but mine seems to be slightly different. My house has stone walls and the wifi signal doesn't pass through easily. We can't even get good landline reception back there on a wireless phone. So I thought I'd extend the phone line back there, which will let me plug in a landline like the olden days. Can I get broadband the same way, either plugging into a modem or adding another wifi router to the back line? We already have a router at front of house, and our experiment with an extender didn't work out because it needs to be reset whenever we turn off the primary one (which we do frequently).
Happy to provide more info if that's unclear.
Thanks!

More about : routers line

March 27, 2014 8:30:32 AM

Yes,its possible to have two routers in a line. I've setup a network where a wireless router was used as an acess point by putting it in line with another computer. However, do you really need wireless or would a wired connection work fine? If you want wireless, a cheap 20 dollar router running from another router would work. If you want wired, i'd just say get a simple switch and a long cable. Then you don't have to mess with the config on a second router.
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 8:47:33 AM

whose said:
Hi,
I know there are a few similar questions that have been answered but mine seems to be slightly different. My house has stone walls and the wifi signal doesn't pass through easily. We can't even get good landline reception back there on a wireless phone. So I thought I'd extend the phone line back there, which will let me plug in a landline like the olden days. Can I get broadband the same way, either plugging into a modem or adding another wifi router to the back line? We already have a router at front of house, and our experiment with an extender didn't work out because it needs to be reset whenever we turn off the primary one (which we do frequently).
Happy to provide more info if that's unclear.
Thanks!


When you say phone line do you mean just that or are you talking a CAT5 line. If it is a standard phone line you can't really use that to hook another router or AP in to. My suggestion would be to put a WAP back where you currently can't get good reception. That WAP really needs to be wired to your existing router, either through a direct cable like a CAT5 cable, or through an ethernet over powerline adapter (so you could use the existing outlets in your house to carry the signal). Your current extender (depending on brand) will probably work as a WAP hooked to a wired link.
m
0
l
Related resources
March 27, 2014 11:10:41 AM

Thanks pyr0_m4n.
"If you want wired, i'd just say get a simple switch and a long cable."
I'm fine using wired in the back room, but what do you mean by "simple switch"? I need to be able to plug something in in the back of the house.
Or should I get an extremely long (30 meters?) ethernet cable, connect it to the router at front of house and run it through the loft? It's a long, skinny house.
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 11:10:43 AM

Thanks pyr0_m4n.
"If you want wired, i'd just say get a simple switch and a long cable."
I'm fine using wired in the back room, but what do you mean by "simple switch"? I need to be able to plug something in in the back of the house.
Or should I get an extremely long (30 meters?) ethernet cable, connect it to the router at front of house and run it through the loft? It's a long, skinny house.
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 11:18:41 AM

When you say phone line do you mean just that or are you talking a CAT5 line. If it is a standard phone line you can't really use that to hook another router or AP in to. My suggestion would be to put a WAP back where you currently can't get good reception. That WAP really needs to be wired to your existing router, either through a direct cable like a CAT5 cable, or through an ethernet over powerline adapter (so you could use the existing outlets in your house to carry the signal). Your current extender (depending on brand) will probably work as a WAP hooked to a wired link.[/quotemsg]
Hi A Bailey,
I think I understand what you mean. What's back there now (or is about to be) is just a standard phone line. Is a CAT5 line just a standard ethernet cable? Can I lay a very long one - say 30 meters - through the loft from the BT Hub to the back room?

m
0
l

Best solution

March 27, 2014 11:36:09 AM

whose said:
Hi A Bailey,
I think I understand what you mean. What's back there now (or is about to be) is just a standard phone line. Is a CAT5 line just a standard ethernet cable? Can I lay a very long one - say 30 meters - through the loft from the BT Hub to the back room?


Yea Cat5 or actually Cat5e or Cat6, but yes a standard ethernet cable. Yes just put an ethernet cable in so you can either hook a computer directly to it, or hook your AP to it for wireless in the back.


Share
March 27, 2014 11:52:17 AM

Yea Cat5 or actually Cat5e or Cat6, but yes a standard ethernet cable. Yes just put an ethernet cable in so you can either hook a computer directly to it, or hook your AP to it for wireless in the back.

Thanks, this is looking hopeful.
I looked up the powerline adaptor that you mentioned which sounds kind of amazing. Do those work as well as they say? Does it matter that this is an old house with oldish (20 year) wiring?
So I can either (1) run an ethernet cable from the BT Hub to the back of the house, plug it in to an access point (probably my existing extender(?), and have either wired or wifi in the back; or (2) simpler, but more expensive, get a powerline adaptor.

Is that right?
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 12:08:18 PM

Yes you are correct on those 2 options.

Powerline adapters have generally had mixed results depending on many factors. The newest generation of powerline adapters are much better and usually work well over even older wiring. This is especially true if your bandwidth needs are 50Mbits or less. It gets a bit harder to get 100Mbits or more through powerline. Anyway I would look for one with the new HomePlug AV2 standard with encryption. But you can try cheaper ones if you want. Just make sure they include encryption
m
0
l
March 27, 2014 2:51:38 PM

whose said:
Thanks pyr0_m4n.
"If you want wired, i'd just say get a simple switch and a long cable."
I'm fine using wired in the back room, but what do you mean by "simple switch"? I need to be able to plug something in in the back of the house.
Or should I get an extremely long (30 meters?) ethernet cable, connect it to the router at front of house and run it through the loft? It's a long, skinny house.


If you want to run a wired connection straight through, that's fine. I didn't know how many devices you planned to use that far away and a switch would make you use less cables for multiple devices.
m
0
l
March 28, 2014 2:48:48 AM

abailey said:
Yes you are correct on those 2 options.

Powerline adapters have generally had mixed results depending on many factors. The newest generation of powerline adapters are much better and usually work well over even older wiring. This is especially true if your bandwidth needs are 50Mbits or less. It gets a bit harder to get 100Mbits or more through powerline. Anyway I would look for one with the new HomePlug AV2 standard with encryption. But you can try cheaper ones if you want. Just make sure they include encryption


Thanks very much. We live in a rural area, and our "broadband" is 2Mbps. So on the one hand I really don't want to slow that down farther, but on the other there's no point in buying something intended for super fast connections. We won't be streaming video around here - it simply doesn't stream.

Cheers!

m
0
l
March 28, 2014 2:49:27 AM

pyr0_m4n said:
whose said:
Thanks pyr0_m4n.
"If you want wired, i'd just say get a simple switch and a long cable."
I'm fine using wired in the back room, but what do you mean by "simple switch"? I need to be able to plug something in in the back of the house.
Or should I get an extremely long (30 meters?) ethernet cable, connect it to the router at front of house and run it through the loft? It's a long, skinny house.


If you want to run a wired connection straight through, that's fine. I didn't know how many devices you planned to use that far away and a switch would make you use less cables for multiple devices.


Ok, thanks!
m
0
l
!