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How do I use 2 NIC's with one switch?

Tags:
  • Networking
  • Network
  • Cameras
  • Dual NIC
  • Switch
  • DVR
Last response: in Networking
March 28, 2014 9:53:08 AM

I am trying to connect a lot of IP cameras, I just added a second network card to my DVR to try to speed things up. So far my network looks like this (with 20 cameras set up and 13 more on the way):



I have no idea how to configure the DVR or switch to take advantage of the dual NIC's though.

Any suggestions are appreciated.
Thanks!

More about : nic switch

March 28, 2014 10:11:59 AM

What DVR do you have? Is it a stand alone or are you using a computer. If a computer, what operating system?
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a b w Digital camera
March 28, 2014 10:16:29 AM

You likely can't unless you have a managed switch.

So I assume the DVR is the machine you have the 2 nics in ?

I would recommend you just upgrade to a 1g nic. Now if you already have a 1g nic and you are exceeding 1g of video traffic then you have a bad ass server being used for a DVR. If you are nowhere close to 1g adding a second nic will buy you nothing your bottleneck is someplace else.

To answer your question assuming you have a managed switch you would run 802.3ad (ie link aggregation) and it would be as if you had a 2g connection. You generally need third party software to do this on the server if it is not server 2012...I think I forget when they added the official support.

The only other way to do this is to build multiple networks and put some cameras on 1 nic and some on the other. You would either need seperate switches or manged switches that support vlans. If you have managed switches link aggregation is going to be simpler than vlans because of the routing issues it adds to the network.
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March 28, 2014 10:28:51 AM

bill001g said:

I would recommend you just upgrade to a 1g nic. Now if you already have a 1g nic and you are exceeding 1g of video traffic then you have a bad ass server being used for a DVR. If you are nowhere close to 1g adding a second nic will buy you nothing your bottleneck is someplace else.


lol, I agree with bill001g. If you have maxed out your 1GB link then your DVR server is bad ass. We use an IBM server with a Dual core processor here and we use 13 cameras. We don't come close to maxing out the Gigabit line but we do max out the processor on the server sometimes. Now we capture video at a pretty good resolution and frame rate, and we use software motion detection.
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March 28, 2014 10:40:51 AM

bill001g said:
You likely can't unless you have a managed switch.

So I assume the DVR is the machine you have the 2 nics in ?

I would recommend you just upgrade to a 1g nic. Now if you already have a 1g nic and you are exceeding 1g of video traffic then you have a bad ass server being used for a DVR. If you are nowhere close to 1g adding a second nic will buy you nothing your bottleneck is someplace else.

To answer your question assuming you have a managed switch you would run 802.3ad (ie link aggregation) and it would be as if you had a 2g connection. You generally need third party software to do this on the server if it is not server 2012...I think I forget when they added the official support.

The only other way to do this is to build multiple networks and put some cameras on 1 nic and some on the other. You would either need seperate switches or manged switches that support vlans. If you have managed switches link aggregation is going to be simpler than vlans because of the routing issues it adds to the network.


bill001g, both NIC's are gigabit already, I'm pretty sure link aggregation is the term I was looking for. If you know where I can find some documentation on how to do that, that would be fantastic! Probably the easier solution would be to add a second switch and just even out the cameras between the two NIC's that way though?
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March 28, 2014 10:51:23 AM

Wow, thats a nice DVR system. Powerful processor. Ok with the Windows 7 Pro, Link Aggregation is not built in, you would have to rely on your specific NIC. Some support it and some don't. But it would most likely have to include the same brand NIC (maybe even same model) as the support for Link Aggregation is made through the NIC driver. If you do have the same 2 NIC's and they support aggregation, then you just need to find a switch that supports it. I have seen (and have one) Gigabit switches as low as $100 that support it. If you can't link your NICS then splitting your cameras into 2 seperate LAN's, putting one to each NIC, would be the best.
.. I guess one last option would be to put in a 10Gbit NIC and buy a 10Gbit switch, but that would be way overkill and pretty expensive.
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March 28, 2014 11:06:45 AM

abailey said:
Wow, thats a nice DVR system. Powerful processor. Ok with the Windows 7 Pro, Link Aggregation is not built in, you would have to rely on your specific NIC. Some support it and some don't. But it would most likely have to include the same brand NIC (maybe even same model) as the support for Link Aggregation is made through the NIC driver. If you do have the same 2 NIC's and they support aggregation, then you just need to find a switch that supports it. I have seen (and have one) Gigabit switches as low as $100 that support it. If you can't link your NICS then splitting your cameras into 2 seperate LAN's, putting one to each NIC, would be the best.
.. I guess one last option would be to put in a 10Gbit NIC and buy a 10Gbit switch, but that would be way overkill and pretty expensive.


Thank you! I'm just using the integrated motherboard gigabit NIC and then an additional gigabit NIC card so I will do some research and find out if it's even possible with my setup. The more I think about it though, the more I'm leaning toward setting up two separate LAN's.
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March 28, 2014 11:08:45 AM

Thanks for the advice both of you!
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a b w Digital camera
March 28, 2014 11:38:44 AM

Just a note. The vendor does not list the specs for the hard drive in your machine. Even fairly advanced server drives can not transfer 1gbit/sec of data normally to get above 1g. you must use raid or ssd. Many of the more common 7200 rpm drive have rating in the 110-120mbyte/sec range which is barely 1g if all things go perfect
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March 28, 2014 2:23:54 PM

bill001g said:
Just a note. The vendor does not list the specs for the hard drive in your machine. Even fairly advanced server drives can not transfer 1gbit/sec of data normally to get above 1g. you must use raid or ssd. Many of the more common 7200 rpm drive have rating in the 110-120mbyte/sec range which is barely 1g if all things go perfect


It's using an SSD for the main drive and then saves video that actually has motion to a bank of 7200 rpm drives.
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