Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Netgear WN2000RPT Instead Of 100ft Cat6 Cable

Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
March 29, 2014 11:57:01 AM

I am using a Netgear N150 WNR1000V3 as an access point wired into a Motorola SBG6580 Modem/Router via a 100ft cat6 cable. I have a Netgear WNR2000RPTV3 that the N150 is replacing because it constantly dropped internet connection with Wi-Fi but Wired was reliable, so I would like to connect it to the Motorola Router/Modem that has same ssid as the N150 as a bridge to then plug an ethernet cable from it to the N150. The problem is i'm afraid the WN2000RPT will instead switch to the N150 with same ssid as the Motorola Router/Modem which will have no internet connectivity. I could always give the N150 a Different ssid but then I could have just used the WN2000RPT because I found a hidden DHCP server page on it and when the devices connected they would find it as a different network and obtain a different ssid, which it would work but I would rather have it look like one network with one ssid and maintain a seamless transition when switching between them. Is there anyway I could use the WN2000RPT as a bridge to the N150 From the Motorola SBG6580 Modem/Router or not? Thanks in advance for your help!
March 29, 2014 12:26:12 PM

You could create an alternate SSID that is just for the link between the access point and the wifi repeater.

Options for best performance:
1) Hardwired ethernet to modem/access point/repeater
2) Powerline adapter where you cant use ethernet
3) Dual band wifi using 5.8 for bridge communicaiton
4) Modem -> access point via ethernet, access point to bridge via wifi, bridge to extender/repeater via ethernet (so you would buy another device to be a bridge, this allows one device to be for access point-> repeater trafffic only)
5) Seperate SSID for access point -> repeater traffic
m
0
l
March 29, 2014 1:51:09 PM

I tend to hate repeaters they advertise them as simple devices but they make such a huge mess of people network because of them trying to be a one size fixes all problems type of box.

You really need the device to run in client-bridge mode only. Ie it should only connect to the main router via wireless and then transmit the data via ethernet. It should not retransmit the wireless signal or do any ip manipulation. These used to be very common devices used to put gaming consoles or tv with only ethernet on a wireless network..now its almost impossible to find a simple device.

So lets assume you can get your repeater to work in that mode.

As you point out if you have a second wireless device that is using the same SSID it could connect to that device. So in your case you are going to have to use different SSID.

Generally this should work very well. This is what a repeater "used" to mean. It used one set of radio signals to talk to the main router (called backhaul most times) and a second radio to talk to the end users. A client-bridge hooked to a AP as you propose is the best way to make your own repeater since you would put the radios on different channels and you would not get the 50% loss of signal capacity.

So if you can get your box to run in client-bridge mode you are in great shape.....

EXCEPT.

When you run a device in client-bridge mode it looks like a end users device. The huge problem you have is that the main router assumes only a single device (ie mac address) is connected and that mac is built into the encryption keys. Works good for the game console or single tv. When you want multiple device behind you get the nasty issue of how you pass multiple macs. To make this work in your case your main router MUST support what is called WDS. This is almost a hack because there is no standard and all devices do not support it the same. What it does is uses a field WDS to pass the actual mac address of the end device and uses the mac of the client-bridge to do the encryption. If you main router supports WDS correctly then you are all set and it will work properly. If not then the only solution is to use your "AP" as a router and make it hide all the actual machines behind its mac. This means you have 2 IP networks and a second nat but there really is no option since this is a due to the main router strictly enforcing the security by not suporting WDS...or not supporting it the same.

I would user the cable....it never breaks and never gives you any trouble.
m
0
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
March 29, 2014 2:01:47 PM

I share your hate for repeaters. People get them thinking ohh wow this is exactly what I need, a device that extanads my wifi, perfect.

Then they have nothing but problems with them and if they do manage to get a half stable connection they discover the noticable drop in performance. The hardware vendors dont exactly make it known that repeaters have to use half their resources/bandwidth talking to the router it is getting it signal from. Not noticible for facebook updates, but you will notice it very quickly trying to stream netflix or even youtube.
m
0
l
March 29, 2014 3:26:47 PM

Are powerline adapters reliable?
m
0
l

Best solution

March 29, 2014 3:50:03 PM

Generally they are more stable than wireless. They are still a radio signal being sent but since it is over the electrical wires it tends to not be as susceptible to interference. That said there are some houses it refuses to work in and devices with motors can cause issue. Vacuum cleaners plugged into the same circuits tend to cause the connection to drop.
Generally it will be a little slower than a wireless connection but it will be very consistent in the speed you get so it is recommended over wireless for people that play online games where quality is more important the the speed.
Share
March 29, 2014 5:17:47 PM

bill001g said:
Generally they are more stable than wireless. They are still a radio signal being sent but since it is over the electrical wires it tends to not be as susceptible to interference. That said there are some houses it refuses to work in and devices with motors can cause issue. Vacuum cleaners plugged into the same circuits tend to cause the connection to drop.
Generally it will be a little slower than a wireless connection but it will be very consistent in the speed you get so it is recommended over wireless for people that play online games where quality is more important the the speed.

I guess I will just stick with the 100ft Cat6 cable thanks for your help!
m
0
l
!