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Need Advice for First Computer Build

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March 30, 2014 2:10:58 AM

So I'm building a computer for the first time, and I intend it to be a high-end gaming computer. My optimal budget ranges up to $3500 max. I don't plan on overclocking. Here is the list of things I plan to buy:

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K Haswell 3.5GHz LGA 1150 84W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics BX80646I74770K

MOTHERBOARD: ASUS MAXIMUS VI HERO LGA 1150 Intel Z87 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

CASE: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced - High Air Flow Full Tower Computer Case with USB 3.0 and All-Black Interior

RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBRL

GRAPHICS CARD: SAPPHIRE Vapor-X 100364VXL Radeon R9 270X 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 CrossFireX Support OC WITH BOOST Video Card

HARD DRIVE: WD Green WD20NPVX 2TB 8MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 2.5" Internal Hard Drive

OPTICAL DRIVE: HP® 481041-B21 Slim 12.7 mm SATA DVD-ROM Optical Drive

POWER SUPPLY: SILVERSTONE Strider Plus ST50F-P 500W ATX 12V v2.3 & EPS 12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Full Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Also, I intend to have dual monitors, so I chose the following to set that up:

MONITOR (x2): Dell S2740L Black 27" 7ms (GTG) IPS-Panel HDMI Widescreen LED Monitor 270 cd/m2 DCR 8,000,000:1 (1000:1)

MONITOR STAND: Rosewill RHMS-13002 Dual Swivel Swing Arm

So, my questions are:

1) Would all of these components work together?
2) Can someone recommend a good cooling system for my CPU, or do I not need one?
3) Do I need anything else?
4) Is the wattage of the PSU I chose good enough?
5) Any other recommendations or anything, please tell me. I've never done anything like this before, so I could use all of the help I could get.

Thank you! :D 

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March 30, 2014 2:39:42 AM

For multi-monitor gaming, get three monitors. Otherwise in FPS games, the bezels are going to be right in the center, not good. Also IPS monitors aren't ideal monitors for gaming, the slow refresh rates can cause ghosting. Look for TN or faster PVA monitors.

If this is a gaming computer and you don't plan to overclock, go with i5 4670 (non K) and a cheaper motherboard. The Hero is a great board (I have it), but it's a waste if you don't overclock.

I would switch out the PSU for something from Seasonic, Corsair (HX or TX), or XFX. I would shoot for 650W.

If you take my advice on the CPU / Mobo, you will save yourself some money and can afford a 770 GTX.
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March 30, 2014 3:41:16 AM

techgeek said:
For multi-monitor gaming, get three monitors. Otherwise in FPS games, the bezels are going to be right in the center, not good. Also IPS monitors aren't ideal monitors for gaming, the slow refresh rates can cause ghosting. Look for TN or faster PVA monitors.

If this is a gaming computer and you don't plan to overclock, go with i5 4670 (non K) and a cheaper motherboard. The Hero is a great board (I have it), but it's a waste if you don't overclock.

I would switch out the PSU for something from Seasonic, Corsair (HX or TX), or XFX. I would shoot for 650W.

If you take my advice on the CPU / Mobo, you will save yourself some money and can afford a 770 GTX.


Thank you so much!! And what are your thoughts on the cooling system? Also, in case I change my mind about the overclocking (95% don't want to, but I might change my mind), does everything work together?
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March 30, 2014 3:55:51 AM

If you decide to overclock, the motherboard is great. I would still consider dropping to an i5 4670K and save some money. The hyperthreading in the i7 doesn't do much of anything for gaming. I have it and the Hero, but I do some distributed computing that sees a benefit from hyperthreading.

As for cooling I always like to to have better than stock cooling, even if I don't plan to overclock the system it's in. A good best for the buck air cooler is the Hyper 212 EVO. If you are thinking about at a AiO water cooler, the Corsair H100 gets good reviews. I have the Cooler Master Eisberg 240L, but it's more expensive and not really better than the H100. It has a more powerful pump, and it's expandable / serviceable / refillable, but the price difference isn't justified. If I had the chance at a do over, I'd pick the H100. I would only consider the AiO if you want a decent overclock. If you plan to run stock, or a mild overclock the Hyper 212 EVO is plenty and leaps and bounds better than the stock HSF.

Oops, didn't notice that you had a Green WD drive in the list. I would make this at the very least a Blue, or even better a Black. The Green drives are slow. If you can squeeze a little more out of your budget, I'd also recommend a SSD (Samsung EVO are reasonably priced) for Windows. Something in the 256GB range would be plenty. You'll still want a HDD though. Then place all your User files on the HDD and any programs / games you don't need to launch quickly. Reserve the SSD for Windows and the programs you do want to launch quickly.
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March 30, 2014 5:32:51 AM

Tom's just redid it's System Builder Marathon. Based on your budget you could build the $2400 PC. In my opinion, and stated in the article, there is very little value in spending that much money on the components (not including monitors). The $1600 Enthusiast build is much better value for the performance. Give the article and read and seriously consider building the exact same thing Tom's did...

You're not interested in overclocking and that's fine, just examine the charts for the non-overclocked performance.
You'll see that in most of the charts, the non-overclocked (Baseline) $1600 PC gets extremely close in performance to the $2400 PC. Therefore, without overclocking, save your money, buy the $1600 PC and spend more money on cool mouse pads!

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/2014-q1-sbm-gtx-780...
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