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How does Nvidia 3D vision work exactly?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 31, 2014 10:24:48 AM

Hey guys,

Since I am planing for making a great upgrade of my PC, and that would aim directly at 3D gaming performance, I just wanna clear things out for myself to be sure if I am on the right way.

Really how does it work? How many frames/sec should I aim at for the perfect 3D immersion in a game?
I heard people saying differently like min 60FPS/eye-120FPS total and others said 120FPS/eye-240FPS total... I was anyway aiming at the 240fps point since I will be anyway combining Nvidia textures too, but just make it clear pls! And that's for all 120Hz monitors (including the new Asus Swift PG278Q).

You might say, i know you will, 3D gaming is dead, but i don't think so - forgot Oculus Rift? Forgot DX12? So nope it's not all gone! You don't have to say anything about how much performance I need - I know that 2-way SLI is a must when it comes to 3D vision....

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a b Î Nvidia
March 31, 2014 10:38:40 AM

60 FPS/Eye (120FPS total) is the definite ideal, 120 FPS per eye, while will look buttery smooth, is a bit overkill in terms of the hardware you'd need to achieve it. You can get by at less framerate than 60/eye, it's just not as pleasant for your eyes for long-term gaming.

You'll need the specific Nvidia glasses as well as a 3D transmitter (they sell this in an all in one kit) as well as a 3D Vision supported monitor. I am not sure if the new ROG Swift will have the transmitter built in or not, though. There are several ASUS and BenQ monitors already on market that have the transmitter built in though.

2-Way SLI is not a must, but a strong video card is. A single 780 or better is more than capable of driving decent, enjoyable framerate with 3D Vision. A couple of 760s or 770s could do it easily, but I wouldn't recommend it on a single-760 or single 770 setup, unless you want to crank a bunch of texture settings down.

Also, definitely not dead :)  I'm enjoying it on a single GTX Titan myself. Metro Last Light in particular looks VERY awesome, and Mirror's Edge is worth a second playthrough with it. Third person games also come surprisingly alive with it as well, such as Mass Effect and Witcher 2.

Also, get familiar with http://helixmod.blogspot.com/ , they work in modding in 3D Vision support for games with either lower or no 3D Vision Ratings to improve upon them.
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March 31, 2014 5:49:07 PM

Thanks a lot, however just to point out, i was asking people from Geforce forums if i could get somehow around the SLI option an do it with 1 card like GTX780Ti or the new GTX 880 Maxwell card coming later on this year...but everyone was denying...
And yes i hear a lot of people saying that the new Asus Swift PG278Q is only 3D compatible, which i am more than happy with if it turn out true. I will just take the nvidia 3d vision kit and go for it... Hope that Watch dogs and GTAV will support 3D...that would be awesome if they do...even though this year's games were kind of crap with optimization.
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a c 81 Î Nvidia
March 31, 2014 6:51:18 PM

Just to be clear, 60 FPS in 3D Vision includes 60 FPS for both the right and left eye, so 120 frames are created. There are no systems that go beyond 60 FPS in 3D that I've ever heard of. If there is one, it would likely be passive.

I'm also interested in the new Asus 1440p G-sync monitor, but have heard it will not support 3D, and definitely will not have an emitter built in.

Also, be aware that 3-way SLI is not supported by 3D Vision, but 2-way is and be aware that you'll likely have to turn down a few settings with a single card and make sure you have a fast CPU. In 3D, the CPU has to supply draw calls for 2 images per frame. That can cause major slow downs in some CPU bound games.
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March 31, 2014 10:39:49 PM

A lot of people/sources say different stuff and I am not really sure... Read this: https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/669686/new-3d-...
And no it will not have an emitter, so yes u need to buy, but that's not a bit deal...just get the Nvidia 3D kit if it happens that is 3D capable. You will have both the glasses and the emitter.

Do you think I won't put a good CPU with those 2 SLI cards? For me, high end cards best go with high end CPUs. So if I take GTX 780Ti, the i7 4930K would be a best fit. So depending on my SLI cards - either GTX 870 or 880 Maxwells', I will either take the entry level extreme CPU from the new Haswell-E lineup - i7 5820K, which would be a 6 core, or the 8-core i7 5930K. I wouldn't take an "X" one since it's just too damn expensive, and I can achieve around the same performance with OC. I don't want the consumer version of 4-core CPUs, even if they are unlocked, because I will also be doing video editing and file conversion and heavy stuff like that... So, I am pretty sure that a 6 or 8 core CPU will work nicely out with 3D vision.

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a c 81 Î Nvidia
March 31, 2014 10:59:22 PM

Whiteskymage said:
A lot of people/sources say different stuff and I am not really sure... Read this: https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/669686/new-3d-...
And no it will not have an emitter, so yes u need to buy, but that's not a bit deal...just get the Nvidia 3D kit if it happens that is 3D capable. You will have both the glasses and the emitter.

Do you think I won't put a good CPU with those 2 SLI cards? For me, high end cards best go with high end CPUs. So if I take GTX 780Ti, the i7 4930K would be a best fit. So depending on my SLI cards - either GTX 870 or 880 Maxwells', I will either take the entry level extreme CPU from the new Haswell-E lineup - i7 5820K, which would be a 6 core, or the 8-core i7 5930K. I wouldn't take an "X" one since it's just too damn expensive, and I can achieve around the same performance with OC. I don't want the consumer version of 4-core CPUs, even if they are unlocked, because I will also be doing video editing and file conversion and heavy stuff like that... So, I am pretty sure that a 6 or 8 core CPU will work nicely out with 3D vision.



You'd be surprised at how many people don't use high end CPU's with their high end GPU's.

Anyways, I hope that ASUS is 3D Vision capable, but that was simply a forum member saying it will work. It is hard to say if he is right. I recall seeing from an ASUS or Nvidia employee, that it was not going to support 3D Vision. If it does, that will likely be my next monitor.

I have yet to see any advertising on the monitor that shows it will be 3D Vision ready. All the Lightboost monitors that are 3D Vision 2 ready, state it in the advertisements. Of course it hasn't been released it, so maybe that will change once it is.
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a b Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 4:49:47 AM

The post I made came straight from an ASUS employee, and his information in posts regarding other matters/products has generally been reliable.

The ROG Swift is definitely 3D Capable based on numerous sources, but like that article mentions, there is a possibility it is only supported up to 1080p, not 1440p, which is the real kicker there. They may not be advertising the 3D Vision because you can't use GSYNC in tandem with 3D Vision (something they're allegedly working on, but unlikely to get fixed), but since the 3D Vision works in tandem with the 120Hz framerate, as well as the built in Lightboost (ULMB now) functionality on the monitor, it does in fact support NVIDIA 3D vision, and this has been confirmed several times by ASUS reps.

Go with a high end GPU and good processor, and if you need the 6 core IB-E or H-E chips for your other uses, go for it. But to answer your original question, if your setup is going to include the ROG Swift, you'll need the transmitter kit, and a high end GPU(s), such as SLI 770s or a single(or SLI) 780/780 Ti. You may or may not be able to use 3D Vision at 1440p, depending on if Nvidia patches that in before the Swift launches (if it actually launches in April.. we have yet to see the ROG Front Base in stores and that was supposed to launch in March), but it is very possible you may only be able to do 3D at 1080p, so you should be fine with my original suggestion of a single 780/780 Ti.

Don't get me wrong, if you want an excuse to just go raw performance and throw money to the wind, I'm certainly not one to stop you, I bought a Titan for crying out loud. But don't overspend if its performance you can't see yourself wanting or using.

Your idea for a Haswell-E with an SLI 870 setup or a single 880 setup would work tremendously well.
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a c 81 Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 7:50:15 AM

CraigN said:
The post I made came straight from an ASUS employee, and his information in posts regarding other matters/products has generally been reliable.

The ROG Swift is definitely 3D Capable based on numerous sources, but like that article mentions, there is a possibility it is only supported up to 1080p, not 1440p, which is the real kicker there. They may not be advertising the 3D Vision because you can't use GSYNC in tandem with 3D Vision (something they're allegedly working on, but unlikely to get fixed), but since the 3D Vision works in tandem with the 120Hz framerate, as well as the built in Lightboost (ULMB now) functionality on the monitor, it does in fact support NVIDIA 3D vision, and this has been confirmed several times by ASUS reps.


Now that is pretty much what I would have expected. 3D Vision kits support any 120hz monitor, but only at 1080p. So it would make sense that the monitor would work at 1080p in 3D Vision without the Lightboost, but since G-sync has a similar feature, I was hoping that too would work.

Now the question is, how much worse will 3D Vision look on a monitor that has to upsample its image to the screen? Maybe it would look best if you left black boarders on?

I'll wait to see what other think, but at least this gives some hope.
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a b Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 10:23:52 AM

The monitor should work in 1080p in 3D Vision *with* Lightboost, or as it's now called, ULMB.

ULMB is the new Lightboost, the only difference is the name, and you can now toggle it from a monitor switch instead of the ToastyX hack, and works just fine with 3D, and like Lightboost, is enabled automatically with 3D, at least, it does with my current GSYNC VG248QE, and I imagine that's the design for the Swift as well.

ULMB does not work with GSYNC though because of the variable refresh rate, however (85, 100, and 120Hz are the supported refresh rates for ULMB), and that probably has to do with why the 3D Vision doesn't either. It's probably much harder to project 3D with a variable refresh rate.

I imagine it'll look as "sharp" as 1080p does on current 27" monitors, imo. I have a 27" as my secondary monitor, and while I wish it was 1440p, it doesn't look bad at 1080p.

Also, the ROG Swift can go up to 144 Hz too. A few reps have said functionally its similar to the VG248QE but visually it's a much better panel.
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a c 81 Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 10:29:34 AM

Upsampling and downsampling never look sharp, though if you push your monitor away from you, it does not look too bad in some cases. It always results in things looking a bit blurred. If everything else works, I may still be interested in that and the quality of up and down-sampling does change from monitor to monitor, and from the drivers.
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April 1, 2014 12:10:32 PM

Ok, ONE Question from me - IF Nvidia Update their 3D vision to support 1440p res, is that going to be enough? I mean, do i just have to update the nvidia driver and switch on 3D on the 1440p resolution without downscaling it to 1080p... because I also hear that this monitor will actually have not 120Hz but will support 144Hz. Don't you think a higher res 3D would require more frequency (Hz) than just 120Hz currently or maybe some other additional hardware?

For the hardware, I mainly look at Maxwell now, since it will probably have big OC headroom with that kind of efficiency, it will do better at coin mining, and with DX12, I expect big boost in performance till the next gen GPUs in 2016, Pascal. Also, for a CPU, would be way better choice to pick a Haswell-E - DDR4, X99, and I guess better SLI support...put 2 cards on a x16 slots, that would be great!

If you are wondwering which CPU matches best which GPU, it's all on "Game Debate". go to their website and search for a GPU (like GTX 780). It will show you the specs of the GPU and which processor is a best match for this GPU. For the GTX 780Ti, it says i7 4930K as best match and for the 780, is i7 4770K. You don't have to be lead exactly by it, but just have in mind that a weak CPU and a strong GPU are NOT a great match.
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a c 81 Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 12:25:15 PM

144hz monitors support 120hz, and many other refresh rates. 3D Vision works at 60hz (120hz monitor required), but many 3D Vision monitors support 144hz in 2D.
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a b Î Nvidia
April 1, 2014 12:35:07 PM

A 4770K is just as good a match for a 780 Ti. The 4770K is by no means a "weak CPU". It's just not a 6-core enthusiast chip. Just putting that out there. I am looking forward to an X99 upgrade later this year if they really come out with an 8-core.

Like bystander said, the Swift will support refresh rates below 144 Hz. If it's anything like the VG248QE, it will have 60, 85, 100, 120, and 144 Hz options.

What you WILL have to do is, say if you are gaming with GSYNC at 144 Hz, and you decide you want to play in 3D, you will then have to go into the NVIDIA control panel, disable GSYNC, switch to 120 Hz, and enable Stereoscopic 3D.

Every NVIDIA card from Fermi to Kepler and up will support DX12. So the GTX 700 series are also supported by DX12.
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