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FX-8350 OC to 4.4Ghz at 1.32V idling around 37-42C using HWMonitor and CM Hyper 212 EVO Plus

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April 2, 2014 10:37:36 AM

Hey guys,

I'm completely new to Tom's Hardware besides the fact that I use this site for researching a lot on computer hardware for my recent build so I can get an understanding of stuff. Anyways, the title of this thread explains everything. I just built my first computer about two weeks ago and have everything up and running perfectly; better than expected. I used the CM Hyper 212 EVO Plus aftermarket cooler for the FX-8350 and Arctic Silver 5 as the thermal compound. I overclocked using BIOS/UEFI on my Crosshair V Formula-Z to 4.4Ghz at 1.32V. Idling only, my temps range from 37-42C. Under load(Battlefield 4 for 1+ hours), My temps never pass 60C using HWMonitor but are around 54-58C while playing Battlefield 4. My main question is this: Are my temperatures idle AND under load safe? Also, is the idling temperature reducing the life of my CPU? I would like to keep it for around 2-3 years until I upgrade again, since I'm in school for Computer Engineering and want to have a stable computer for running Multisim and other non-vigorous applications. Thanks for any comments and answers!

- Chad Greenburg
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April 2, 2014 10:51:47 AM

Anything under 60 C is good

Idle temps are fie too
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April 2, 2014 7:12:46 PM

Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !
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April 2, 2014 9:17:52 PM

WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.
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April 2, 2014 9:55:12 PM

Is this core temperature or socket temperature. HWmonitor will have different temps.
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April 2, 2014 11:26:38 PM

CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that
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April 3, 2014 12:05:04 AM

ohyouknow said:
Is this core temperature or socket temperature. HWmonitor will have different temps.


Well the other temp in HWMonitor under "AMD FX-8350" -> "Package" jumps rapidly between 15-25 C within a matter of seconds at random moments so I'm just assuming it's the other one because the other one listed as "CPU" stays at a stable temperature all the time unless I boot up a game or something. Also, I doubt I'd be getting 15 C overclocked with an aftermarket heatsink. Maybe if it were watercooled.

I increased my CPU fan speed profile through BIOS/UEFI so now I'm idling at 34 C at this exact moment. I just want the max life out of my CPU, and this is the highest I'm overclocking it because I don't feel like tweaking voltage.
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April 3, 2014 12:28:25 AM

When I play Guild Wars 2 for about 15 mins, the "Package" temperature is around 35 C, and the "CPU" temperature is 44 C, so now I'm led to believe the "Package" temperature is my true CPU core temperature since socket temp is higher than core temperature most of the time right? I've googled around and others are saying Package temperature is my actual core temperature but I just find it hard to believe that my CPU is idling around 15 C using the Hyper 212 EVO and not watercooled. Is there any other good CPU temperature monitoring software that is accurate?
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April 3, 2014 4:14:17 PM

CGreenburg said:
When I play Guild Wars 2 for about 15 mins, the "Package" temperature is around 35 C, and the "CPU" temperature is 44 C, so now I'm led to believe the "Package" temperature is my true CPU core temperature since socket temp is higher than core temperature most of the time right? I've googled around and others are saying Package temperature is my actual core temperature but I just find it hard to believe that my CPU is idling around 15 C using the Hyper 212 EVO and not watercooled. Is there any other good CPU temperature monitoring software that is accurate?


AMD uses a calculation to determine temperatures rather than an individual sensor. This is only accurate from around 30+ so when it get's to ridiculously low temperatures add 20'c to it.
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June 20, 2014 11:29:59 AM

Shain Taylor is correct, AMD has left it to pure calculations which is why you tend to see the instant spikes and falls in temps. HWMoniter always says my 8350 is idling at 13'C to 16'C but then under a minor load it'll jump to 28'C or 30'C on average. I'm currently using the Corsair H80i CPU cooler in push/pull setup. Now one thing that I'm switching to Intel for is that with the AMD 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ your sucking about 230-250W instead of the rated 120-130W @ 4.0GHZ BClock and the 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ or 4.8GHZ barely hits the low end capabilities of the i7-4770K. The 8350 Can OC to 5.0GHZ, but your sucking so many watts you can see the bill steadily increasing and that CPU is not natively stable for long at that BClock. Plus it has to be liquid cooled in order to hit those speeds without overheating.
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June 20, 2014 11:36:49 AM

Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that


This is blatantly false and don't go around spreading false information. Prime95/Intel Burn Test/ Aida64 etc all are required to test your system for absolute stability. If it fails then it's not stable period.
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June 20, 2014 9:35:02 PM

dacquesta1 said:
Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that


This is blatantly false and don't go around spreading false information. Prime95/Intel Burn Test/ Aida64 etc all are required to test your system for absolute stability. If it fails then it's not stable period.


Ive been building computers for 30 + years , and they are stable when set up properly . No stress test was ever required
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June 20, 2014 10:45:27 PM

jdcranke07 said:
Shain Taylor is correct, AMD has left it to pure calculations which is why you tend to see the instant spikes and falls in temps. HWMoniter always says my 8350 is idling at 13'C to 16'C but then under a minor load it'll jump to 28'C or 30'C on average. I'm currently using the Corsair H80i CPU cooler in push/pull setup. Now one thing that I'm switching to Intel for is that with the AMD 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ your sucking about 230-250W instead of the rated 120-130W @ 4.0GHZ BClock and the 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ or 4.8GHZ barely hits the low end capabilities of the i7-4770K. The 8350 Can OC to 5.0GHZ, but your sucking so many watts you can see the bill steadily increasing and that CPU is not natively stable for long at that BClock. Plus it has to be liquid cooled in order to hit those speeds without overheating.


OCed haswell quads pull upwards of 180 watts [depending on the OC ], making the difference in power consumption about the same as running a light bulb
If you game a couple of hours a day for a year the running cost difference is about $15 [ again it depends where you live ] And if you live in colder climates heat produced is going to offset other heating and might cost you nothing . Nothing at all
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June 21, 2014 7:21:46 PM

Outlander_04 said:
jdcranke07 said:
Shain Taylor is correct, AMD has left it to pure calculations which is why you tend to see the instant spikes and falls in temps. HWMoniter always says my 8350 is idling at 13'C to 16'C but then under a minor load it'll jump to 28'C or 30'C on average. I'm currently using the Corsair H80i CPU cooler in push/pull setup. Now one thing that I'm switching to Intel for is that with the AMD 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ your sucking about 230-250W instead of the rated 120-130W @ 4.0GHZ BClock and the 8350 OC'd to 4.7GHZ or 4.8GHZ barely hits the low end capabilities of the i7-4770K. The 8350 Can OC to 5.0GHZ, but your sucking so many watts you can see the bill steadily increasing and that CPU is not natively stable for long at that BClock. Plus it has to be liquid cooled in order to hit those speeds without overheating.


OCed haswell quads pull upwards of 180 watts [depending on the OC ], making the difference in power consumption about the same as running a light bulb
If you game a couple of hours a day for a year the running cost difference is about $15 [ again it depends where you live ] And if you live in colder climates heat produced is going to offset other heating and might cost you nothing . Nothing at all


The point wasn't necessarily just considering the cost of a light bulb as you put it. The added wattage translates into heat (energy), thus you are required to have better cooling (which costs more) in order to keep the CPU at decent temps or you need to go liquid cooled so that way you build doesn't sound like an aircraft. So, it's not just the cost of a light bulb. Of course, I'm also gearing my statement to those that have a tighter budget. As full liquid loops are not cheap and most won't go that route if they don't have to due to finances or skepticism/ignorance of how to put it together or how they really work.
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June 21, 2014 7:29:06 PM

Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that



That is totally wrong. Prime95 will bring any stability problems you may have to the fore if you overclock. You can get silent data corruption that cascades into a drive that eventually won't even boot and not be aware of it till it is too late. That is what stress testing is for. If you are Prime95 stable your chances of getting this kind of data corruption is basically nil.

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June 21, 2014 7:38:51 PM

Outlander_04 said:
dacquesta1 said:
Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that


This is blatantly false and don't go around spreading false information. Prime95/Intel Burn Test/ Aida64 etc all are required to test your system for absolute stability. If it fails then it's not stable period.


Ive been building computers for 30 + years , and they are stable when set up properly . No stress test was ever required


Then what do you advise the multitude of people who overclock their cpu's, ram, tweak ram timings etc.... to do? Just assume their computers are 100% stable if they can game and browse the web? You read on these forums continuously about people who have "golden chips" that run at so and so speed at so and so voltage. Then they run IBT or Prime95 and find out that there overclocks were built on a house of cards.
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June 22, 2014 1:41:57 AM

bmacsys said:
Outlander_04 said:
dacquesta1 said:
Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that


This is blatantly false and don't go around spreading false information. Prime95/Intel Burn Test/ Aida64 etc all are required to test your system for absolute stability. If it fails then it's not stable period.


Ive been building computers for 30 + years , and they are stable when set up properly . No stress test was ever required


Then what do you advise the multitude of people who overclock their cpu's, ram, tweak ram timings etc.... to do? Just assume their computers are 100% stable if they can game and browse the web? You read on these forums continuously about people who have "golden chips" that run at so and so speed at so and so voltage. Then they run IBT or Prime95 and find out that there overclocks were built on a house of cards.


Id advise people to use their chips as they do , and if they have an instability problem then back off on the OC

[ or make whatever other changes are required to make the pc stable in the intended usage ]

Prime 95 is so artificial it tells you pretty much nothing
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June 22, 2014 7:11:15 AM

Outlander_04 said:
bmacsys said:
Outlander_04 said:
dacquesta1 said:
Outlander_04 said:
CGreenburg said:
WaKy said:
Welcome to Tom's Hardware !
As long as your temps under load are under 62 C you will be okay ! Make sure to check from time to time. I assume u already ran a stability test !


I ran prime95 for 20 minutes and my CPU reached 66 C so I stopped it because I don't want my CPU being damaged. I've heard prime95 will shut off as soon as even one core fails but, being my first build ever, I'm kind of skeptical and don't want anything wrong to happen.


There is no good reason to ever run a stress test like prime 95 . It wont tell you anything you dont already know : your temps are fine . No game will ever load your cpu like that


This is blatantly false and don't go around spreading false information. Prime95/Intel Burn Test/ Aida64 etc all are required to test your system for absolute stability. If it fails then it's not stable period.


Ive been building computers for 30 + years , and they are stable when set up properly . No stress test was ever required


Then what do you advise the multitude of people who overclock their cpu's, ram, tweak ram timings etc.... to do? Just assume their computers are 100% stable if they can game and browse the web? You read on these forums continuously about people who have "golden chips" that run at so and so speed at so and so voltage. Then they run IBT or Prime95 and find out that there overclocks were built on a house of cards.


Id advise people to use their chips as they do , and if they have an instability problem then back off on the OC

[ or make whatever other changes are required to make the pc stable in the intended usage ]

Prime 95 is so artificial it tells you pretty much nothing


That's fine that you think it has no purpose because that's just how you do things. However, I'm not seeing any real reasons why you think that. All that keeps getting said is that it's artificial, not good, fake, or doesn't tell you anything. None of those reasons are actually worth a grain of salt and are solely your opinion and not any actual reason why people building should not use Prime95 or other stress testers for their builds. The entire reason I use them is to figure out what my build can handle and at what actual temps. I do not just go off the "real world" calculations that the manufacturer is telling me, which is theoretical at best. From the experience I've had and from what I've read of others on this site and on other sites is that every chip is different. They might be the same model and brand or whatever, but they're as different from each other as two white guys or as a pair of whatever other creature. So, at least I use the stress testers to find out the general amount that my build can handle at what temps and start tweaking from there.
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June 22, 2014 8:45:19 AM

Again, if it doesn't pass prime95 it isn't 100% stable. Keep building your OC'd computers that you don't test (I sure as hell know I wouldn't trust one of your PC's at anything other than stock clocks).
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