Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

New to using SSD - simple question

Last response: in Memory
Share
April 3, 2014 7:07:19 AM

Hi
I'm getting a pc for gaming. It'll have a 250Gb SSD, as well as 1Tb HDD. I don't know much about SSD so I've got some basic questions.

Is the advantage of SSD that programs and games will open up much more quickly; and in games, that levels will load up more quickly?

Are there other advantages (for gaming)?

My main question is: will I have to manage where programs/games are installed? I guess I will want to have the OS installed on the SSD, as well as favourite games - that right?

What happens if I fill the 250GB SSD with programs? Do I then uninstall lesser-used programs (older games) from the SSD and then reinstall them on the HDD? Or does the computer handle this automatically?

Here's a side question: how much space do games typically take when installed on an SSD?

More about : ssd simple question

a c 261 G Storage
a c 241 } Memory
April 3, 2014 7:15:39 AM

Anything installed on the SSD will have faster load times, if a game is installed there it will load quicker but it will not actually increase FPS but you will be faster into battle in any first person shooter.
Never fill a SSD about 20% space left and it will slow down, I have OS and programs on my SSD's (few computers) but never install more than one game at a time on it with 250GB you probably can fit 2 or 3.
m
0
l
a c 80 G Storage
a b } Memory
April 3, 2014 7:19:22 AM

Good questions.

Load times are the main advantage of an SSD - not much else will be improved, but the PC will seem much speedier.

Put the OS, and a few games and apps on the SSD. Yes you have to manage the space so it doesn't fill up.

Games take up the same amount of spca on an ssd as they do on a HDD - it's different for each game.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 760 G Storage
a c 84 } Memory
April 3, 2014 7:20:04 AM

Quote:
Is the advantage of SSD that programs and games will open up much more quickly; and in games, that levels will load up more quickly?


Yes. It completely transforms the whole experience. The whole system feels snappier.
Also, better reliability.

As far as space....OS and applications don't really take that much space. They can all live on the SSD.
For Steam games - within the Steam client, you can designate multiple locations. When installing a game, tell it where to go.

Also, see these tutorials for where and how to put things:
Win 7 & 8: http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1834397/ssd-redirect...
Win 8.1: http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-2024314/windows-redi...
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 99 G Storage
a b } Memory
April 3, 2014 7:27:01 AM

Games will load faster on the SSD, thats the only difference it will make over a HDD. You wont get more FPS or anything like that. In my opinion, only games worth having on an SSD are ones with constant (Fallout, Skyrim) or long (WoW) loading screens.

Yes, you will have to manage where programs and games are installed. I typically only have the OS and core programs (things you will be using constantly like your web browser, any driver software, rainmeter, Office Suite, etc) on the SSD. Though with 250GB you definitely have room to add more in.
The main thing when it comes to having an SSD is resetting default settings so it doesnt fill up. For instance you will want to create a Downloads folder on your HDD and point programs (torrent program,web browser, etc) at it, because by default they will download to C:.
Also a good tip, you can install Steam and Steam games on separate drives.

As for how large the games will be, completely depends on the game. Crysis 3 is going to take up more room than Portal, you just cant really say.
Share
a b G Storage
a b } Memory
April 3, 2014 7:27:14 AM

A few games that stream a lot of data during gameplay may have higher FPS when installed on an SSD, but this is the exception. In most games there will be no effect on FPS whatsoever.
m
0
l
April 4, 2014 2:10:50 AM

Thank you all for your answers. Much appreciated!

So let's say I get a new game that I'm going to play a lot - so I install it on the SSD (keeping the initially downloaded files somewhere on the HDD). Then after six months, I've played that game quite a lot and there's a new game that takes my fancy (and not much space left on the SSD) so I uninstall the six-month-old game from the SSD and install it on the HDD to play it less frequently.

I'd have to put the saved game data somewhere, I suppose, so I don't lose my progress?

Is that the right way to do things? Is that what others do?

As for games sizes on the disk - let's say we're talking about triple A type games what sort of space do they take up (ball park)?
m
0
l
a b G Storage
a b } Memory
April 4, 2014 3:02:51 AM

typically, you're going to be installing from Origin or Steam, which either you can choose where to install. They don't keep the download files anywhere, but you can move the installation. Origin is easy to do manually, Steam has Steam Mover. Games saves take up a small amount of space, so you probably won't need move them.
m
0
l
!