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Intel Core i7-4930K 3.4GHz 6-Core with Asus X79 Deluxe ATX LGA2011 Motherboard and G.Skill Trident X Series 16GB (2 x 8G

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April 7, 2014 9:44:26 AM

ok here is the build i wana make:
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3nAN6

Here are my questions :

Will my cpu and motherboard b able 2 fully use my DDR3-2400 memory (1.65volts) is those parts going good 2gether and is it true that i should buy 4X4 ram instean of 2X8

And PLZ if u see any problem with this build tell me
Sory for the typing mistakes english is not my first language
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 7, 2014 10:09:19 AM

Is this for games? If so, the 4770k will probably perform better and cost less than the 4930k. Games don't use 6 cores almost ever (Crysis 3 exception). Each core on the 4770k is a little faster, and it will keep up with the 780 ti card you have. Either processor can overclock on a high-end motherboard to take use of the 2400 RAM, but again with the limited utility for gaming. Games don't rely very much at all on RAM speed. You can save money here too.

Take a look at this: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3nDBT

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 750GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($350.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($709.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower Case ($105.98 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: LG BH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Wired Gaming Keyboard ($119.00 @ Mechanical Keyboards)
Keyboard: Razer Orbweaver Elite Mechanical Gaming Keypad Wired Gaming Keyboard ($115.61 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer Naga Epic Wireless Laser Mouse ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Speakers: Corsair Gaming Audio Series SP2500 232W 2.1ch Speakers ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $2756.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-07 13:16 EDT-0400)

It saves you about $500 with no gaming performance loss in almost every game in existence, and even better performance in CPU-bound games. It also has a larger SSD that's just as fast, twice the RAM, and a better CPU cooler.

If you're going to do more CPU-intensive stuff, then LGA 2011 might make sense. Do you do heavy photo or video editing? Also, if you want to put in SLI with 2 or 3 cards in addition to having other PCI-e cards, then LGA 2011 may make sense. It lets you add more cards, but other than that, Z87 is where it's at for gaming. I have LGA 2011, and I still think this.
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April 7, 2014 10:12:00 AM

4x4GB RAM would take an advantage of quad channel memory and I would recommend you 4x4GB 1866MHz CL9 RAM
Also I would add 25$ and get H100i cooler!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4930K 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor ($564.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: Asus X79 Deluxe ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($324.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($154.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($389.00 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($709.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower Case ($105.98 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: Corsair 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: LG BH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Wired Gaming Keyboard ($119.00 @ Mechanical Keyboards)
Keyboard: Razer Orbweaver Elite Mechanical Gaming Keypad Wired Gaming Keyboard ($115.61 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer Naga Epic Wireless Laser Mouse ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Speakers: Corsair Gaming Audio Series SP2500 232W 2.1ch Speakers ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $3224.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-07 13:10 EDT-0400)
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a c 680 à CPUs
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April 7, 2014 10:50:46 AM

Made some changes to your build, and came out cheaper as well.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4930K 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor ($564.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: Asus X79 Deluxe ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($324.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($154.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M500 480GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($234.00 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($104.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($709.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower Case ($105.98 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($125.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG BH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Wired Gaming Keyboard ($119.00 @ Mechanical Keyboards)
Keyboard: Razer Orbweaver Elite Mechanical Gaming Keypad Wired Gaming Keyboard ($115.61 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer Naga Epic Wireless Laser Mouse ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Speakers: Corsair Gaming Audio Series SP2500 232W 2.1ch Speakers ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $3100.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-07 13:50 EDT-0400)
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April 7, 2014 11:01:14 AM

Eggz said:
Is this for games? If so, the 4770k will probably perform better and cost less than the 4930k. Games don't use 6 cores almost ever (Crysis 3 exception). Each core on the 4770k is a little faster, and it will keep up with the 780 ti card you have. Either processor can overclock on a high-end motherboard to take use of the 2400 RAM, but again with the limited utility for gaming. Games don't rely very much at all on RAM speed. You can save money here too.

Take a look at this: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3nDBT

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 750GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($350.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($709.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower Case ($105.98 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: LG BH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow Ultimate Wired Gaming Keyboard ($119.00 @ Mechanical Keyboards)
Keyboard: Razer Orbweaver Elite Mechanical Gaming Keypad Wired Gaming Keyboard ($115.61 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer Naga Epic Wireless Laser Mouse ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Speakers: Corsair Gaming Audio Series SP2500 232W 2.1ch Speakers ($239.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $2756.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-07 13:16 EDT-0400)

It saves you about $500 with no gaming performance loss in almost every game in existence, and even better performance in CPU-bound games. It also has a larger SSD that's just as fast, twice the RAM, and a better CPU cooler.

If you're going to do more CPU-intensive stuff, then LGA 2011 might make sense. Do you do heavy photo or video editing? Also, if you want to put in SLI with 2 or 3 cards in addition to having other PCI-e cards, then LGA 2011 may make sense. It lets you add more cards, but other than that, Z87 is where it's at for gaming. I have LGA 2011, and I still think this.


ok tx for the tips on the video card. i mostly plan on gaming but in the game i will play like Elders scrools online or FF XIV i know that this is good but with further content on the game and the big group of toons that cast spells i was wondering if the LGA 2011 was not the way 2 go. for the video card i planned (when the need arise) to SLI them. And off course i was hoping to OC all the way i can and i whant all the thing to be stable (yea i ask for evrything sry)

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April 7, 2014 11:19:00 AM

For the SSD i know that there is bigger and less costly out there. My concern is that it is stable and fast i found on benchmark site that the Samsung 840 Pro Series was one of the best. i do not need uge disk space i curently use no more then 350 GB right now. For the ram i see u all suggess the Ripjaws 1866. Will it be able to keep with games hungry on graphic (think of a group of 8+ toons casting spells and such). i'm a worst case scenario type of person.
keep giving me advice i need them
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April 7, 2014 11:38:18 AM

Toms often recommend the M500 in its best for the money article, hence my choice. I don't like spending more for less storage.
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a b à CPUs
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April 7, 2014 12:06:38 PM

I am also a worst case scenario person. Here is what I think about the CPU and SSD.

CPU
I think that the worst case is that the 4930k will be slower in games than the 4770k. I have the 3930k, which is almost exactly the same as the 4930k in terms of performance. The 4770k is better for games. Take a CPU-bound game like Borderlands 2. It will use 3 cores only. On my 3930k, 3 of the 12 logical cores will be near 100%, but the others will do nothing. That's only about 20% overall usage, and the game gets bottlenecked. Basically, almost every game will treat you processor like a quad-core anyway. Each core is its own processor, so why wouldn't you want 4 processors that are faster? If you get the 4930k, you'll only use 3 or 4 cores in games, and those cores are slower than those on the 4770k. The other difference is that you'll have 2 cores in the 4930k doing nothing because the game can't use them.

If you want to exaggerate the same problem to see the point, consider the Intel Xeon E5-2697 v2 Ivy Bridge-EP 2.7GHz 30 MB L3 Cache LGA 2011 130W 12-Core Server Processor, which costs $2,750. You get 12 cores similar to the 4770k, but they are only running at 2.7 Ghz each. On top of that, they are just a little slower to begin with. But if you have software that can use 12 cores, the overall speed becomes more important than the individual speed of each core. In that case the Xeon would definitely be faster than the 4770k. Running 12 processors at 2.7 Ghz will get a job done faster than 4 processors running at 4.5 Ghz. But if you turned off all all but 4 of the processors on the Xeon, the 4770k would smoke it! In essence, that's exactly what games do. As far as a game is concerned (usually) all cores/processors in addition to 4 are treated as off.

What matters to you for gaming, and a lot of other things, is called "Single Core Performance" or "Single Thread Performance." The 4770k has the fastest single core performance of any non-server CPU made right now. Take a look at the PassMark scores for yourself.

SSD
The Samsung 840 EVO and the 840 Pro are the same speed if you limit yourself on the EVO to 500 GB or more. The 250, 120, and 64 are all slower than the pro. The only difference is the EVO has triple-layer cells (TLC) and the Pro has single-layer cells (SLC). If you upgrade your SSD more than every decade, that doesn't matter. The SLC just makes the SSD last longer if you are constantly writing new data to it, which servers do. Gaming computers aren't servers. You won't write enough for it to matter. Also, the EVO has some technology called "Rapid" that actually makes the EVO faster than the Pro in certain cases. It'll use up to 1 GB of RAM as cache for the drive, and it also sets aside some of the memory cells to work as SLC so they can be written to a lot constantly, while the rest remain TLC for more storage. Checkout the spec sheet on page 3 of this link for the EVO speeds, and then compare them to spec sheet on page 7 of this link for the Pro speeds. You'll notice the larger EVOs perform right along side the Pro for a much better price.
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April 7, 2014 1:25:42 PM

Ok First thing first tx a lots Eggz for the complete explanation.

ok so i checked around the different asus maximus and made a change i would like to know if this is bether OC wise or is it just snoke screnn oriented to people that have soma basis but no solid knowelge (yea u got it that's me)

I added the water cooling Corsair H100I as suggsted in nearly all build.

here is the link http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3nJpQ

Finally i've put 4X8 Ram will i c a concreate difference or just 4X4 ram would b plenty enough (don'T wana upgrade next year)

CPU Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core $319.99
CPU Cooler Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid $99.99
Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Formula ATX LGA1150 $299.79
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 $300.98
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 750GB 2.5" SSD $350.99
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB $709.99
Case NZXT Phantom (Black/Green) ATX Full Tower $105.98
Power Supply Corsair 860W ATX12V / EPS12V $199.99
Optical Drive LG BH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $94.99
Keyboard Razer BlackWidow Ultimate $119.00
Razer Orbweaver Elite Mechanical Gaming Keypad $115.61
Mouse Razer Naga Epic Wireless Laser $104.99
Speakers Corsair Gaming Audio Series SP2500 232W 2.1ch $239.99

Is there something missing?? anyone know if the case is right for wather cooling ? and anything i should know before i make that build (i'll order it in may if evrything goes well)
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April 7, 2014 1:40:11 PM

That's a pretty friggin' sweet computer, man. The only thing I'd suggest looking into is the size of the thing. You don't really have that much stuff in it, and you may be able to build a more compact machine that still has good air flow.

The motherboard you have is ATX size, but you can get all of this stuff on a Micro ATX (a.k.a. "mATX" or "uATX"). Here is a list of mATX boards, which will be able to accommodate everything you have, including another video card if you want: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...

If you got a mATX motherboard, you would be able to chose from this case list: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...
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