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Please help 1st custom build: Photography, editing, and business mutli-tasking for my real job.

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  • Photo
  • editing
  • Build
  • Business Computing
  • Systems
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April 8, 2014 9:05:10 AM

Hello! I am looking for a complete walk through on suggestions for a build that will do many things and have respectable longevity. I just do not know where to draw the line. Budget is reasonably flexible, would love to see it under 2K and really, if I would love to hit 1500.00 range, would make it even more in my budget, if functionality is not compromised.
What I do: -#1 I own a Hallmark shop and run all my invoices and records with my pc. Just lots of documents and files mostly for accounting purposes and bill payment. I use a Neat Desk to capture all documents. Eventually, would like to be able to view security cameras from work with my pc, once they are installed but this is not currently a priority, this year. Need to be able to pull up simple documents when the phone rings for a vendor with out crashing my photo editing programs, or freezing the pc up. I run my social media postings also while working, editing, and doing all at once, often.
#2 I have tens of thousands of photos, currently many on an external hard drive, due to the larger files sizes. I shoot raw and fine jpeg concurrently. Many of my finished files are huge. I do art shows, juried events, and sell my photography/digital finished products. Using Photoshop CS5 64 bit (needing to update), Bridge, occ Lightroom, and often Paint Shop Pro current edition and Painter. If I apply too many layers, I lose my work and have a crash.
#3 I already have monitor, an NEC MultiSync P241w and an Epson Pro Printer 3800(getting out dated but it works!) , need to have great graphics card so the calibration between the three is accurate. I am not a professional, but an aspiring amateur who has good luck in selling some pieces, winning awards, and love to play with my photos alot, althewhile working on my real work.....
#4 Speed is important, growth, or having the right first build is where I need help!!
#5 Burner drive to create discs with larger photo sizes would be lovely. I do light video editing. Also want to be able to play DVDs and burn.
#6 Memory to multi task important, as I usually run my editing to use up to 75% thinking it would run better?
--Looking to stay with Windows 7-8.1, been on XP so long, I have no opinion on these.

Help, my pc mother board has a glitch, and besides I was running on XP and need to move on.....Need guidance asap to get my work files back online before all my invoices are overdue! I am sure my hard drive is fine, and I have a mirror image of my last backup to put on a new build. Also, my photo files were also all backed up on an external drive, thank Goodness!

Thanks, and sorry for the wordy post and any expedited assistance!

More about : 1st custom build photography editing business mutli tasking real job

April 8, 2014 9:32:46 AM

I'm not going to give a specific list, but for your #2:

Factor in backup solutions into the build price.

I use a lot of the same software as you. Lightroom, Paintshop Pro, etc, etc. Shooting RAW and JPEG.
Just as a guideline, I have the i5-3570k, 16GB RAM, a couple SSD's, and have never seen a slowdown in operation.
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April 8, 2014 9:41:45 AM

This build may suit your needs, though I am not an expert at the video editing builds

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($146.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($22.95 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($138.64 @ Amazon)
Total: $1769.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 12:32 EDT-0400)

-CPU- i7 is what you will want for sure
-Mobo- you can probably save some money here, I simply prefer higher quality hardware, there are some pretty good mobos in the $130 range, also I am assuming you will not be overclocking your cpu so you could go for the i7-4770 (no k) and a H87 motherboard chipset rather than the z87 chipset which would be cheaper. I do feel that the higher end z87 chipset boards are better quality than the h87 boards
-Storage- Put a 250gb SSD for your operating system and core applications + other items you may want to load faster. Also a 2 TB hardrive for file storage, this can be easily increased or lowered to 1 or 4 tb depending on your needs.
-graphics card- gtx 780 is considered a gaming card, however workstation cards are a few hundred $$ more and should get you similar performance. This is the one item I am least sure about, but from what I have looked up this card would get you the most performace per $ without breaking the bank.
-Case- Any case with good airflow would work, the fractal R4 is supposed to be a pretty quiet case but this is a personal choice
- Power Supply- a good quality 650w will run this system, i recommend seasonic as they make some of the best
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April 8, 2014 10:00:24 AM

USAFRet said:
I'm not going to give a specific list, but for your #2:

Factor in backup solutions into the build price.

I use a lot of the same software as you. Lightroom, Paintshop Pro, etc, etc. Shooting RAW and JPEG.
Just as a guideline, I have the i5-3570k, 16GB RAM, a couple SSD's, and have never seen a slowdown in operation.


Thanks for the quick response, I have lots to consider and appreciation your sharing the expertise.
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April 8, 2014 10:47:40 AM

numanator said:
This build may suit your needs, though I am not an expert at the video editing builds

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($146.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($22.95 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($138.64 @ Amazon)
Total: $1769.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 12:32 EDT-0400)

-CPU- i7 is what you will want for sure
-Mobo- you can probably save some money here, I simply prefer higher quality hardware, there are some pretty good mobos in the $130 range, also I am assuming you will not be overclocking your cpu so you could go for the i7-4770 (no k) and a H87 motherboard chipset rather than the z87 chipset which would be cheaper. I do feel that the higher end z87 chipset boards are better quality than the h87 boards
-Storage- Put a 250gb SSD for your operating system and core applications + other items you may want to load faster. Also a 2 TB hardrive for file storage, this can be easily increased or lowered to 1 or 4 tb depending on your needs.
-graphics card- gtx 780 is considered a gaming card, however workstation cards are a few hundred $$ more and should get you similar performance. This is the one item I am least sure about, but from what I have looked up this card would get you the most performace per $ without breaking the bank.
-Case- Any case with good airflow would work, the fractal R4 is supposed to be a pretty quiet case but this is a personal choice
- Power Supply- a good quality 650w will run this system, i recommend seasonic as they make some of the best


numanator, thanks for working up a list for me to work off of, this is where I needed to start. I like what you have suggested and have some questions.....
I am interested in learning more about the overclocking and have been trying to learn what are the advantages for editing, or even how this works and how you engage in the process, and what would I gain- not to mention at what expense to my build? I do agree with the Z87 recommendation but which one are you quoting? I see several listed but they are upwards toward $900?? and yes to the i7-4770K vs the no K, (are these recommended over Nvidias?) I have read Nvidias work better with Photoshop, but this was compared against AMDs in an article. On memory, how much more to go ahead and make it 24gb? And on the graphics card, please share some of the cost differences and performance, if you would. I do not know what you are comparing to when you mention the workstation card...... Best for editing and my NEC monitor?
Finally (I think) where do I get all these and someone to put the build together? How much should I pay for the build? I built my own once, but that was 15 years ago, 3 pcs ago and I have no interest in doing so again.......lol. Thanks so much for your help! Sue
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April 8, 2014 11:20:40 AM

No problem!

For overclocking: this is essentially running your processor (cpu) at a higher speed than what it was set for by the factory. Overclocking your cpu generates more heat and consumes more power but you can get more processing power out of your hardware. So in order to overclock, you would need a good CPU cooler and a good power supply (the one i put in the link is sufficient for overclocking). The cooler i listed in the build would be ok for a small overclock but is mainly used to keep temperatures down in general. A good cooler for overclocking is about $100.

For some more general info on overclocking see this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/overclocking-guide-...

So for z87 motherboards, the one i linked in the build is pretty good but I personally would not spend more than $200 on a motherboard. Either go for the one I linked or go for the Asus Maximus Hero for about $200. I doubt you would notice the difference between the 2 though, the more expensive ones just allow for better/more stable overclocking and have a few more features.

For the i7-4770k vs no k- the only difference is that the k version can be overclocked (OC) while the non-k version cannot. Similarly the Z87 motherboards allow you to OC the CPU but the H87 Motherboards do not.

As for the Nvidia vs AMD discussion, i believe you are referring to the graphics card (since nvidia does not make cpus). The graphics card (GPU) I put into the build is the Nvidia GTX 780 with the EVGA coolers. Esentially Nvidia makes the basic graphics card and EVGA made/put together the fans and provides warranty support. There are certain programs that function better on Nvidia cards and others that work better on AMD GPUs.

For the memory, boosting it up to 24gb would probably be best with a set of 2x4gb ram sticks. You always want to get your ram in pairs since running ram sticks in dual channel mode gives you better performance by about 13% compared to a single stick (the actual performance boost varies but is typically between 10%-15%). So the best option for getting up to 24gb ram would be to have the 2x8gb ram posted above and another 2x4gb ram. Normally you want to have ram with the same speed/maker to try to avoid errors caused by using different ram. 2x4gb ram would be about $60-80 more.

Best place to get it built would be a local computer shop. Online stores and such cost more and have limited part availability. A local shop will probably cost you about $100-200 to build but depends on the shop.
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April 8, 2014 11:24:43 AM

Based on those criteria here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($142.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1521.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 14:24 EDT-0400)

Slightly over budget but should handle everything you need.
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April 8, 2014 11:44:30 AM

numanator said:
No problem!

For overclocking: this is essentially running your processor (cpu) at a higher speed than what it was set for by the factory. Overclocking your cpu generates more heat and consumes more power but you can get more processing power out of your hardware. So in order to overclock, you would need a good CPU cooler and a good power supply (the one i put in the link is sufficient for overclocking). The cooler i listed in the build would be ok for a small overclock but is mainly used to keep temperatures down in general. A good cooler for overclocking is about $100.

For some more general info on overclocking see this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/overclocking-guide-...

So for z87 motherboards, the one i linked in the build is pretty good but I personally would not spend more than $200 on a motherboard. Either go for the one I linked or go for the Asus Maximus Hero for about $200. I doubt you would notice the difference between the 2 though, the more expensive ones just allow for better/more stable overclocking and have a few more features.

For the i7-4770k vs no k- the only difference is that the k version can be overclocked (OC) while the non-k version cannot. Similarly the Z87 motherboards allow you to OC the CPU but the H87 Motherboards do not.

As for the Nvidia vs AMD discussion, i believe you are referring to the graphics card (since nvidia does not make cpus). The graphics card (GPU) I put into the build is the Nvidia GTX 780 with the EVGA coolers. Esentially Nvidia makes the basic graphics card and EVGA made/put together the fans and provides warranty support. There are certain programs that function better on Nvidia cards and others that work better on AMD GPUs.

For the memory, boosting it up to 24gb would probably be best with a set of 2x4gb ram sticks. You always want to get your ram in pairs since running ram sticks in dual channel mode gives you better performance by about 13% compared to a single stick (the actual performance boost varies but is typically between 10%-15%). So the best option for getting up to 24gb ram would be to have the 2x8gb ram posted above and another 2x4gb ram. Normally you want to have ram with the same speed/maker to try to avoid errors caused by using different ram. 2x4gb ram would be about $60-80 more.

Best place to get it built would be a local computer shop. Online stores and such cost more and have limited part availability. A local shop will probably cost you about $100-200 to build but depends on the shop.


Thanks for the information! My husband is wondering about the functional difference on the video card, what about the 750, or the 770 that g-unit recommended? Much difference in functions?
And I think I am not going to worry about the OC, so would the no "k' version and h87 function just the same if no OC needed? and how would these things change your suggested list of part prices? Also, what about a 1T instead of the 2T, would I really notice? I do wish to do the 24gb of memory from the get go......maybe these changes would not alter the functioning much, but bring the price down??
Thanks again, Sue
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April 8, 2014 11:51:21 AM

mccallum23 said:


Thanks for the information! My husband is wondering about the functional difference on the video card, what about the 750, or the 770 that g-unit recommended? Much difference in functions?
And I think I am not going to worry about the OC, so would the no "k' version and h87 function just the same if no OC needed? and how would these things change your suggested list of part prices? I do wish to do the 24gb of memory from the get go......maybe these changes would not alter the functioning much, but bring the price down??
Thanks again, Sue


I'd consider 32GB RAM instead of 24. 4 x 8 GB sticks.
An H87 motherboard will not be a drawback.
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Best solution

April 8, 2014 12:24:31 PM

Made a few changes.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($294.50 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus H87-PLUS ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($100.00 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($339.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($100.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1599.36
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 15:20 EDT-0400)

After reading up a bit, it looks like the gtx 770 or even the 760 would be able to take care of your needs. The best option would be a workstation card but those are pretty darn expensive.

-Changed to 32gb ram (this would be more stable than 24gb since we are keeping the ram sticks the same)
-dropped HDD to 1tb
- changed to no overclock

You can remove the cpu cooler but i prefer the aftermarket cooler to the stock cooler that comes with the i7 cpu.
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April 8, 2014 12:29:22 PM

As for the difference between the gtx 750, 760, 770, and 780 they are ordered from least to most powerful. Functionally for photoshop, you want your graphics card to accelerate your rendering while the cpu carries most of the load. Unfortunately finding data on video card performance for vdeo editing software is pretty difficult so I cant really figure out how much of a difference each card would make (most of the data is in reference to video games, which put a majority of the load on the graphics card typically).
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April 8, 2014 12:59:54 PM

numanator said:
Made a few changes.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($294.50 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus H87-PLUS ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($100.00 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($57.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($339.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($100.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.98 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 Pro (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1599.36
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 15:20 EDT-0400)

After reading up a bit, it looks like the gtx 770 or even the 760 would be able to take care of your needs. The best option would be a workstation card but those are pretty darn expensive.

-Changed to 32gb ram (this would be more stable than 24gb since we are keeping the ram sticks the same)
-dropped HDD to 1tb
- changed to no overclock

You can remove the cpu cooler but i prefer the aftermarket cooler to the stock cooler that comes with the i7 cpu.


Thanks so VERY much for you help! Been out of doing my own stuff for so long, but considering putting it together. By the way, if I went for a 1.5 T storage do you think I would really need it? And if so, which one would you recommend? I promise, this was my last question! I also appreciate everyone's suggestions very much!

Best, Sue
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April 8, 2014 1:01:56 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Based on those criteria here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($142.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1521.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 14:24 EDT-0400)

Slightly over budget but should handle everything you need.


Thank you SO very much for taking the time to help me out. With you help, Numerators, and everyone else's I believe I almost have everything ready to order and get my life put back together! Thanks again for your assistance, the site here is wonderful for resourceful help and knowledge!
Sue
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April 8, 2014 1:06:49 PM

mccallum23 said:


Thank you SO very much for taking the time to help me out. With you help, Numerators, and everyone else's I believe I almost have everything ready to order and get my life put back together! Thanks again for your assistance, the site here is wonderful for resourceful help and knowledge!
Sue


Good luck! (and don't forget the backups)
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April 8, 2014 1:52:41 PM

As to how much storage you will need, that all depends on how many files and of what type you are keeping. For my needs 1 TB is enough and I keep extra media on an external 1 TB. If you plan to have a lot of large files (like HD videos) then you may eat up that 1 tb pretty quickly. If you are unsure about if you will need more space or not, it is pretty easy to add another hardrive after in addition to the SSD and HDD especially since the motherboard supports 8 SATA connections (SATA is the connection used for hard drives and disc drives).

I would stick with the 1tb and add on in the future as needed. Also as USAFRet mentioned, it might be a good idea to setup a backup hardrive. In this case setting up a second 1TB hardrive in raid 1 would help (raid 1 mirrors the drive so both drives would have the exact same data).
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April 8, 2014 2:02:46 PM

numanator said:
As to how much storage you will need, that all depends on how many files and of what type you are keeping. For my needs 1 TB is enough and I keep extra media on an external 1 TB. If you plan to have a lot of large files (like HD videos) then you may eat up that 1 tb pretty quickly. If you are unsure about if you will need more space or not, it is pretty easy to add another hardrive after in addition to the SSD and HDD especially since the motherboard supports 8 SATA connections (SATA is the connection used for hard drives and disc drives).

I would stick with the 1tb and add on in the future as needed. Also as USAFRet mentioned, it might be a good idea to setup a backup hardrive. In this case setting up a second 1TB hardrive in raid 1 would help (raid 1 mirrors the drive so both drives would have the exact same data).


RAID 1 is not a backup. Yes, it faithfully mirrors data across two or more dries. It also faithfully mirrors accidental deletions, viruses, corruption.
Any business that uses a RAID 1 also has a valid backup scenario.
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April 8, 2014 2:06:37 PM

USAFRet said:


RAID 1 is not a backup. Yes, it faithfully mirrors data across two or more dries. It also faithfully mirrors accidental deletions, viruses, corruption.
Any business that uses a RAID 1 also has a valid backup scenario.


Hmm, good to know. I personally don't have experience setting up a backup for a business.

What sort of setup would you recommend for backing up data in this situation?
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April 8, 2014 2:34:09 PM

numanator said:

Hmm, good to know. I personally don't have experience setting up a backup for a business.

What sort of setup would you recommend for backing up data in this situation?


There's basically 3 levels of stuff you need to ensure safety of
OS
OS + applications
Data

OS
Once a particular PC gets its OS, I make an image
Save that image on a different drive.

OS + applications
Once the basic software stack is installed, also make an image of that.
Save it to that other drive

Now take that drive offline.
In case of major drive fail, you can restore just the OS, or the whole software stack.
Maybe update those images once a month.
I also have all the original install disks and serial numbers/activation keys as an absolute fallback point.

Data
This is the only stuff that cannot be easily replaced. I can't go back to last year and retake a pic of my grandson.

So....using one of the several applications, copy whichever folders on a schedule.
Currently, I'm using SyncBack Free.
Free, and once you get the schedule set up, it's all hands-off. It just does it.
Point it at a source and target, and whatever is changed or new gets copied over to the target.

My current schedule is this:
Every 12 hours, copy to another drive in the PC. Noon and midnight.
Every 24 hours, copy to an external drive attached to another PC. Every night at 3 AM.
Remember, we're just copying data. Music, pictures, database files....stuff that actually changes.

If I were doing this for a business, I'd add another drive, and keep one offsite. Rotate that external thing weekly.
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April 8, 2014 2:43:15 PM

USAFRet said:


There's basically 3 levels of stuff you need to ensure safety of
OS
OS + applications
Data

OS
Once a particular PC gets its OS, I make an image
Save that image on a different drive.

OS + applications
Once the basic software stack is installed, also make an image of that.
Save it to that other drive

Now take that drive offline.
In case of major drive fail, you can restore just the OS, or the whole software stack.
Maybe update those images once a month.
I also have all the original install disks and serial numbers/activation keys as an absolute fallback point.

Data
This is the only stuff that cannot be easily replaced. I can't go back to last year and retake a pic of my grandson.

So....using one of the several applications, copy whichever folders on a schedule.
Currently, I'm using SyncBack Free.
Free, and once you get the schedule set up, it's all hands-off. It just does it.
Point it at a source and target, and whatever is changed or new gets copied over to the target.

My current schedule is this:
Every 12 hours, copy to another drive in the PC. Noon and midnight.
Every 24 hours, copy to an external drive attached to another PC. Every night at 3 AM.
Remember, we're just copying data. Music, pictures, database files....stuff that actually changes.

If I were doing this for a business, I'd add another drive, and keep one offsite. Rotate that external thing weekly.


Learned something new today. Thanks!
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April 8, 2014 7:09:18 PM

USAFRet said:
numanator said:

Hmm, good to know. I personally don't have experience setting up a backup for a business.

What sort of setup would you recommend for backing up data in this situation?


There's basically 3 levels of stuff you need to ensure safety of
OS
OS + applications
Data

OS
Once a particular PC gets its OS, I make an image
Save that image on a different drive.

OS + applications
Once the basic software stack is installed, also make an image of that.
Save it to that other drive

Now take that drive offline.
In case of major drive fail, you can restore just the OS, or the whole software stack.
Maybe update those images once a month.
I also have all the original install disks and serial numbers/activation keys as an absolute fallback point.

Data
This is the only stuff that cannot be easily replaced. I can't go back to last year and retake a pic of my grandson.

So....using one of the several applications, copy whichever folders on a schedule.
Currently, I'm using SyncBack Free.
Free, and once you get the schedule set up, it's all hands-off. It just does it.
Point it at a source and target, and whatever is changed or new gets copied over to the target.

My current schedule is this:
Every 12 hours, copy to another drive in the PC. Noon and midnight.
Every 24 hours, copy to an external drive attached to another PC. Every night at 3 AM.
Remember, we're just copying data. Music, pictures, database files....stuff that actually changes.

If I were doing this for a business, I'd add another drive, and keep one offsite. Rotate that external thing weekly.


Thanks very much, to both of you. I do have Acronis for backups in an external drive. I will be more faithful in rotating the imaging from now on, thanks! Sue
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April 8, 2014 8:16:34 PM

numanator said:
As for the difference between the gtx 750, 760, 770, and 780 they are ordered from least to most powerful. Functionally for photoshop, you want your graphics card to accelerate your rendering while the cpu carries most of the load. Unfortunately finding data on video card performance for vdeo editing software is pretty difficult so I cant really figure out how much of a difference each card would make (most of the data is in reference to video games, which put a majority of the load on the graphics card typically).


Hello,
Just one final inquiry...are there any other cases you could recommend that would have the usb ports off the top? Really would prefer them lower as my unit will sit on top pf my desk for access and the ports would be more hidden if they were lower. Not a big issue, just thought with so many hundreds available, you might have some knowledge to go with the build, which I love, btw. Thanks in advance, once more!
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April 8, 2014 11:05:48 PM

Cant think of any off the top of my head so looking into finding a case with the usb ports a bit lower

This one has the ports lower but I personally do not like the mesh look:

Case: Cooler Master N600 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $59.99
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April 9, 2014 8:41:18 AM

would this full size one work? I am down to this, and the ones in the build are midsize. My SO is wanting this one with the extra fans, would it fit everything, or be way too big? I do not mind as long as it is compatible and it is not on the parts list to verify. Thanks one last time!
It is at tiger direct

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...
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April 9, 2014 9:39:54 AM

mccallum23 said:
Hello
Just one final inquiry...are there any other cases you could recommend that would have the usb ports off the top? Really would prefer them lower as my unit will sit on top pf my desk for access and the ports would be more hidden if they were lower. Not a big issue, just thought with so many hundreds available, you might have some knowledge to go with the build, which I love, btw. Thanks in advance, once more!


Well there's a couple of things I would need to know before I start suggesting cases:

- How much you want to spend
- Form factor (ATX mid tower, ATX full tower, mATX, mITX, etc)
- How many drive bays you need
- Whether or not you want a side panel or front door
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April 9, 2014 9:53:19 AM

mccallum23 said:
would this full size one work? I am down to this, and the ones in the build are midsize. My SO is wanting this one with the extra fans, would it fit everything, or be way too big? I do not mind as long as it is compatible and it is not on the parts list to verify. Thanks one last time!
It is at tiger direct

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...


That one would work fine, I wasn't sure how big you wanted to go with the tower. Just make sure that you are ok with the size of it since it is almost (2 inches shy of) 2 ft long and 2 ft tall
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April 9, 2014 10:16:00 AM

numanator said:
That one would work fine, I wasn't sure how big you wanted to go with the tower. Just make sure that you are ok with the size of it since it is almost (2 inches shy of) 2 ft long and 2 ft tall


No it won't, Ultra is among the worst of the worst when it comes to PC component manufacturers. Avoid like the plague!

Ideally the best case manufacturers are:

- Corsair
- NZXT
- Antec
- Fractal Design
- Bitfenix
- Azza
- Cooler Master
- Nanoxia
- Lian Li
- Rosewill
- Silverstone

These brands are decent but have flaws - OK to buy but not necessarily great, middle of the road:

- Aerocool
- Sentey
- Xigmatek
- Zalman
- In Win
- Thermaltake

These brands are junk and extremely poor quality - you do not want to purchase anything by them:

- Apevia
- Raidmax
- Xion
- Xclio
- Athenatek
- Diablotek
- Ultra (any SYX sub brand avoid like the plague!)
- Cubitek
- Apex
- HEC
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April 9, 2014 10:32:50 AM

g-unit1111 said:


No it won't, Ultra is among the worst of the worst when it comes to PC component manufacturers. Avoid like the plague!

Ideally the best case manufacturers are:

- Corsair
- NZXT
- Antec
- Fractal Design
- Bitfenix
- Azza
- Cooler Master
- Nanoxia
- Lian Li
- Rosewill
- Silverstone

These brands are decent but have flaws - OK to buy but not necessarily great, middle of the road:

- Aerocool
- Sentey
- Xigmatek
- Zalman
- In Win
- Thermaltake

These brands are junk and extremely poor quality - you do not want to purchase anything by them:

- Apevia
- Raidmax
- Xion
- Xclio
- Athenatek
- Diablotek
- Ultra (any SYX sub brand avoid like the plague!)
- Cubitek
- Apex
- HEC


Had not heard of the brand before and figured they couldn't be that bad. I was only thinking of the "will it all fit" needs for the case rather than the quality on that one, lesson learned.
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April 9, 2014 10:46:50 AM

g-unit1111 said:
numanator said:
That one would work fine, I wasn't sure how big you wanted to go with the tower. Just make sure that you are ok with the size of it since it is almost (2 inches shy of) 2 ft long and 2 ft tall


No it won't, Ultra is among the worst of the worst when it comes to PC component manufacturers. Avoid like the plague!

Ideally the best case manufacturers are:

- Corsair
- NZXT
- Antec
- Fractal Design
- Bitfenix
- Azza
- Cooler Master
- Nanoxia
- Lian Li
- Rosewill
- Silverstone

These brands are decent but have flaws - OK to buy but not necessarily great, middle of the road:

- Aerocool
- Sentey
- Xigmatek
- Zalman
- In Win
- Thermaltake

These brands are junk and extremely poor quality - you do not want to purchase anything by them:

- Apevia
- Raidmax
- Xion
- Xclio
- Athenatek
- Diablotek
- Ultra (any SYX sub brand avoid like the plague!)
- Cubitek
- Apex
- HEC


Thanks for the list, I am sure there are many who will benefit from this reference! I am looking now for a moderate price with 2-5 built in fans to compliment my cooler. I will go back and look at the Fractal you both recommended and browse from there, unless you have additional suggestions. I am holding off ordering everything until I know it is compatible. Thanks again......please send any others either of you suggest......
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April 9, 2014 11:20:15 AM

You shouldn't need anything over a GTX 760 unless your doing AutoCAD and the like. I use a 4gb GTX 760 myself (helps with large resolutions and is only 50$ more than the standard). And i7 like others have said should help greatly (My buddy has one and it is FAST) but just putting it out there, I do video editing with an i5 4670k (haven't overclocked) on my own PC and just did a 720p 30 minute video with light editing yesterday and it took me about 10-15 minutes to render so if that sounds "alright" then you could probably step down to an i5 if you want to cut corners although I'm not saying you should ;) .
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April 9, 2014 11:58:39 AM

Also, If you have a Micro Center near you could go with this build.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($269.99 @ Micro Center)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.99)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 760 4GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS/I Snow Edition (White/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1340.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-09 14:43 EDT-0400)

The reason I listed the K version of the processor and Z87 motherboard is the combo price of them together is actually cheaper, I also didn't list an aftermarket cooler for this reason as well since your not overclocking anyway.
The case IS more geared towards gamers however its a great case with enough features to please as well as being pretty damn cheap.

You can get also the video card at Micro Center as well though 20$ more, I didn't include an OS since pcpartpicker doesn't list Micro Center's price (Windows 8.1 64bit OEM is 90$) and Micro Center can put it together for you for around 120$ bringing the total to $1570.91
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April 10, 2014 8:06:55 AM

GamerBam said:
Also, If you have a Micro Center near you could go with this build.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($269.99 @ Micro Center)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.99)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 760 4GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS/I Snow Edition (White/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1340.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-09 14:43 EDT-0400)

The reason I listed the K version of the processor and Z87 motherboard is the combo price of them together is actually cheaper, I also didn't list an aftermarket cooler for this reason as well since your not overclocking anyway.
The case IS more geared towards gamers however its a great case with enough features to please as well as being pretty damn cheap.

You can get also the video card at Micro Center as well though 20$ more, I didn't include an OS since pcpartpicker doesn't list Micro Center's price (Windows 8.1 64bit OEM is 90$) and Micro Center can put it together for you for around 120$ bringing the total to $1570.91


Thank you for you time and suggestions. I am building with the A455-1203 Asus z87-pro and the Evga ge force GTX 770 video card with the i7-4770k processor. I am wondering if the built in graphic/video on the MoBo will slow things down since I will be adding the 770? I know my pc will only be as fast as the weakest component and if there is a comparable MoBo with out the built in feature, then would it be better and maybe save me on a component that is unneeded?
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April 10, 2014 8:12:10 AM

g-unit1111 said:
numanator said:
That one would work fine, I wasn't sure how big you wanted to go with the tower. Just make sure that you are ok with the size of it since it is almost (2 inches shy of) 2 ft long and 2 ft tall


No it won't, Ultra is among the worst of the worst when it comes to PC component manufacturers. Avoid like the plague!

Ideally the best case manufacturers are:

- Corsair
- NZXT
- Antec
- Fractal Design
- Bitfenix
- Azza
- Cooler Master
- Nanoxia
- Lian Li
- Rosewill
- Silverstone

These brands are decent but have flaws - OK to buy but not necessarily great, middle of the road:

- Aerocool
- Sentey
- Xigmatek
- Zalman
- In Win
- Thermaltake

These brands are junk and extremely poor quality - you do not want to purchase anything by them:

- Apevia
- Raidmax
- Xion
- Xclio
- Athenatek
- Diablotek
- Ultra (any SYX sub brand avoid like the plague!)
- Cubitek
- Apex
- HEC


Thanks, going with a Corsair 600T graphite! These opinions helped alot!
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April 10, 2014 9:36:59 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Based on those criteria here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($142.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1521.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 14:24 EDT-0400)

Slightly over budget but should handle everything you need.


Another question....... I am planning on the SSD drive and your recommendation is the 120, and the others all suggested the 250. For the $50 difference I would save, or lose, is there any need to have the larger hard drive? My programs are fairly straightforward for business and photograpghy. Windows OS, all the Office products, Cs5 and up, PSP, painter, Neat Desk, and all the misc programs one accumulates, too many smaller ones to list. What do you think? The 120 is really just storage, and I am putting in a 2T additional as a secondary hard drive. Opinion?
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April 10, 2014 9:37:35 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Based on those criteria here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($142.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1521.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 14:24 EDT-0400)

Slightly over budget but should handle everything you need.


Another question....... I am planning on the SSD drive and your recommendation is the 120, and the others all suggested the 250. For the $50 difference I would save, or lose, is there any need to have the larger hard drive? My programs are fairly straightforward for business and photograpghy. Windows OS, all the Office products, Cs5 and up, PSP, painter, Neat Desk, and all the misc programs one accumulates, too many smaller ones to list. What do you think? The 120 is really just storage, and I am putting in a 2T additional as a secondary hard drive. Opinion?
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April 10, 2014 9:45:45 AM

mccallum23 said:


Another question....... I am planning on the SSD drive and your recommendation is the 120, and the others all suggested the 250. For the $50 difference I would save, or lose, is there any need to have the larger hard drive? My programs are fairly straightforward for business and photograpghy. Windows OS, all the Office products, Cs5 and up, PSP, painter, Neat Desk, and all the misc programs one accumulates, too many smaller ones to list. What do you think? The 120 is really just storage, and I am putting in a 2T additional as a secondary hard drive. Opinion?


I have a 120GB SSD as the boot drive, and a LOT of the same applications as you.
Currently, ~51GB used space. OS and all applications.

Images all live on different drives.

But for $50 difference, if I were buying today, I'd get the 250GB
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April 10, 2014 10:24:42 AM

mccallum23 said:
g-unit1111 said:
Based on those criteria here's what I would suggest:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.49 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($349.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Titanium Grey) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($142.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($23.52 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($102.98 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1521.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-08 14:24 EDT-0400)

Slightly over budget but should handle everything you need.


Another question....... I am planning on the SSD drive and your recommendation is the 120, and the others all suggested the 250. For the $50 difference I would save, or lose, is there any need to have the larger hard drive? My programs are fairly straightforward for business and photograpghy. Windows OS, all the Office products, Cs5 and up, PSP, painter, Neat Desk, and all the misc programs one accumulates, too many smaller ones to list. What do you think? The 120 is really just storage, and I am putting in a 2T additional as a secondary hard drive. Opinion?


Do you have the list of the final build parts that you've decided on? You can save money by getting a cheaper graphics card since they don't help as much as people believe them to. One advantage is support for more monitors but you can get that with a standard video card.
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April 10, 2014 8:08:42 PM

mccallum23 said:
GamerBam said:
Also, If you have a Micro Center near you could go with this build.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($269.99 @ Micro Center)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($104.99)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($169.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Micro Center)
Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 760 4GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake Commander MS/I Snow Edition (White/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.99 @ Micro Center)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.99 @ Micro Center)
Total: $1340.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-09 14:43 EDT-0400)

The reason I listed the K version of the processor and Z87 motherboard is the combo price of them together is actually cheaper, I also didn't list an aftermarket cooler for this reason as well since your not overclocking anyway.
The case IS more geared towards gamers however its a great case with enough features to please as well as being pretty damn cheap.

You can get also the video card at Micro Center as well though 20$ more, I didn't include an OS since pcpartpicker doesn't list Micro Center's price (Windows 8.1 64bit OEM is 90$) and Micro Center can put it together for you for around 120$ bringing the total to $1570.91


Thank you for you time and suggestions. I am building with the A455-1203 Asus z87-pro and the Evga ge force GTX 770 video card with the i7-4770k processor. I am wondering if the built in graphic/video on the MoBo will slow things down since I will be adding the 770? I know my pc will only be as fast as the weakest component and if there is a comparable MoBo with out the built in feature, then would it be better and maybe save me on a component that is unneeded?


Well you could go with an AsRock Extreme4 Z87 motherboard which is a little cheaper than the Asus and still has plenty of features (including incredible on board sound) and you could also cut down to only 16gb of ram (I only included an extra set to give an idea of price) since anything over is best suited for autocad and any GTX 700 card should actually do well, even the 750ti (the non ti version only has 1gb of vram, not enough for serious editing) which is considerably cheaper would do great though I still hold on to my opinion on getting a GTX 760 because you can get a 4gb version for the shear reason of helping with higher resolutions (where as the 750ti is restricted to 2gb at the moment) and supporting multiple monitor set ups, anything over is best suited for heavy gaming and autocad however if your dead set on getting a 770 then make sure to get a 4gb version, I can't stress this enough when working with high resolution imagery or multiple monitors. And as for the graphics built into the i7, when you put in your video card of choice it will essentially disable the on board graphics, there will not be any slow down.
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