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Final Options For First Ever Build: Do You See Any Problems With It? (Video Editing, Graphics, Photoshop)

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April 9, 2014 4:50:16 AM

Hi everyone,

Thanks again for all who have provided valuable and informative feedback. These forums (and other similar sites) have been a huge help and provided me with an option to attempt my own build in a somewhat informed fashion, so thanks. I hope I can return the favor some day!

Here is my latest build for a machine I would like to build to do HD video editing and After Effects, plus photoshop, internet, office, etc... Do you see any issues or problems with it?

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4930K 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor ($559.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus P9X79 ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($243.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Kingston 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($310.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12G 650W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply ($96.50 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($222.58 @ Newegg)
Total: $1974.94
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-09 07:42 EDT-0400)

Thanks for your feedback, it is appreciated.

Paolo

More about : final options build problems video editing graphics photoshop

April 9, 2014 4:59:33 AM

get a better gpu like 770...780...780 ti and 4gb gddr5

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April 9, 2014 5:28:41 AM

Change processor, mobo and GPU. Choose a corei5 processor, 780ti for GPU and For mobo get any z87 chipset mobo
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Best solution

April 9, 2014 5:36:13 AM

Do you people realize, this is not a gaming build?

http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Premier...
http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Photosh...

Anything more than 660 does not bring any performance boost. The 4930k does the considerably job faster than the LGA 1150 processors.

P.S Nice choice on the monitor. Be sure to get a 2nd one as soon as possible. It really is that much more convenient.
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April 9, 2014 5:47:44 AM

That's a hell of a spec, my only changes might be to upgrade to a 770 w/ 4 GB of video memory - after effects and photoshop are resource thiefs. I used a 660 on a build for a new graphic designer and it gets a little hung up when she's doing a large render. Not horrible, but definitely noticeable. Not sure that the 4930k is pivotable unless you're doing 3D modeling or video animation, a 4770k w/ a ASRock Z87 Pro4 motherboard would probably be more than sufficient and it would save you enough to cover the cost of the upgraded card. If and when they release the new Haswell-Extreme processors I would be interested to see their performance.
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April 9, 2014 6:01:03 AM

A large render of what?

After Effects renders on CPU only. It does use the GPU for some 3D features and preview:

From Adobe website:

"The GPU features in After Effects CS6 and later can be thought of in three categories:

GPU-accelerated ray-traced 3D renderer (CUDA on specific graphics cards)
Fast Draft mode and Hardware BlitPipe (OpenGL with somewhat stringent requirements)
OpenGL swap buffer (OpenGL with looser requirements)"

The Photoshop and PP, I covered with benchmarks in the other post.
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April 9, 2014 7:36:28 AM

Shneiky said:
Do you people realize, this is not a gaming build?

http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Premier...
http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Photosh...

Anything more than 660 does not bring any performance boost. The 4930k does the considerably job faster than the LGA 1150 processors.

P.S Nice choice on the monitor. Be sure to get a 2nd one as soon as possible. It really is that much more convenient.


Thanks, agree on monitors. Initially was going to get two 22" for about 120 each, but then was informed I'd want 2ms monitors, not the 5ms I chose. So grabbed the 27" above, will definitely get another one soon.

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April 9, 2014 7:54:58 AM

game junky said:
That's a hell of a spec, my only changes might be to upgrade to a 770 w/ 4 GB of video memory - after effects and photoshop are resource thiefs. I used a 660 on a build for a new graphic designer and it gets a little hung up when she's doing a large render. Not horrible, but definitely noticeable. Not sure that the 4930k is pivotable unless you're doing 3D modeling or video animation, a 4770k w/ a ASRock Z87 Pro4 motherboard would probably be more than sufficient and it would save you enough to cover the cost of the upgraded card. If and when they release the new Haswell-Extreme processors I would be interested to see their performance.


Interesting. Thanks. I did look at the 770, but brought it down to 760 for cost. I also had the 4770k in an earlier build but obviously switched that, too. Is THIS the mobo you reference? Big cost difference from one I have currently.

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April 9, 2014 9:49:09 AM

The Z87 motherboards are entirely different than the X79, it is 2 different sockets with 2 different price tags. Z87 accommodate the quad Core I7s, while the X79 accommodate the 6 core I7s (there is the 4 core 3820/4820, which is an upgraded 3770k). You can not switch processors between those.

Also, for video editing, 5 ms is perfectly fine. When you edit a normal 24 frames per sec. videos, you get 0.40 ms for each of the frames. If you have 60 fps interlaced footage - you get 0.016 s - 8 ms for 1 half and 8 ms for 2nd half. Any monitor with 5 ms is good. All those 2ms/1ms monitors are a marketing gimmick. Some gamers may say it makes a difference and etc. etc. but games have variable fps. Footage doesn't.
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April 10, 2014 7:30:54 AM

Shneiky said:
The Z87 motherboards are entirely different than the X79, it is 2 different sockets with 2 different price tags. Z87 accommodate the quad Core I7s, while the X79 accommodate the 6 core I7s (there is the 4 core 3820/4820, which is an upgraded 3770k). You can not switch processors between those.

Also, for video editing, 5 ms is perfectly fine. When you edit a normal 24 frames per sec. videos, you get 0.40 ms for each of the frames. If you have 60 fps interlaced footage - you get 0.016 s - 8 ms for 1 half and 8 ms for 2nd half. Any monitor with 5 ms is good. All those 2ms/1ms monitors are a marketing gimmick. Some gamers may say it makes a difference and etc. etc. but games have variable fps. Footage doesn't.


Thanks for all your input Shneiky. I went ahead with the build seen above. Looking forward to trying to put it all together! Though I see a lot of reviews on Newegg reporting trouble with the Asus Mobo I selected.
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April 10, 2014 7:36:27 AM

Almoust all X79 motherboards need a BIOS flash to work with 4820 4930 and 4960 CPUs. All the 2011 motherboards were made for 3820 3930 and 3960/3970 with the promise of the new generation working with only bios update. Anyway, if you get a board with older bios, you just need a USB stick and some very careful, step-by-step reading and execution.

And also: on most Asrock, Asus, MSI, EVGA X79 motherboards there are such rants. All the people that got a problem will post, but just a tiny part of the ones who are happy will write.
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April 10, 2014 11:43:09 AM

PaoloPaolo said:
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($222.58 @ Newegg)
For image editing and any type of work where you want proper colors on-screen, then I suggest getting either an IPS or PLS type monitor.

Most monitors use a TN panel (like the VE278H). TN panels have worse viewing angles and will result in colors getting worse at any slight angles. Whites will turn brownish if you increase the angle enough. Also, since the corners of the screen are at a different angle to your eye than the center of the screen, that means the colors in the corner of the screen will be a slightly different color than in the center of your screen (something that people who do image editing might notice).
This could also be a problem for multi-monitor use, if you are unable to curve the extra monitors around you. (If, for some reason, you can only setup them up without rotating the two on the ends, then the two TN panels on the end of a 3 monitor setup would probably start showing image quality issues -- a rare case I know, since you can usually rotate them.)

Now, that you know about panel type. Look for an IPS or PLS monitor and then consider these other factors:

* matte vs glossy: Do you want a highly reflective screen or a matte (sandy/rough) looking finish? The glossy has great colors, but can often give you headaches with all the glare it causes. Many people choose matte because of the glare issue.

* 16:9 vs 16:10 -- Many monitors are 1920x1080 (16:9 ratio). However, another popular size is the 1920x1200 (16:10 ratio), which gives you extra vertical space to work with. This extra vertical space costs more, but is very useful when you do productive work on a computer (like you are doing).

* resolution / screen size -- If you get a 27" monitor with a 1920x1080 resolution, chance are that you will begin to notice the bigger pixels. The screen will have this black grid (like a screen door). For a 27" monitor, the ideal resolution is around 2560x1440. For 1920x1080 the max recommend resolution is usually a 24" or 23" so the screen door effect is not as noticeable.
However, to be fair, even at 27" on a 1920x1080 screen, the "screen door" effect is not that bad. I suggest that you check out one in the store... because if it looks ok for you then, the 27" 1080p offers a really cheap option for a large screen size.

So, here's my recommendations:

A general list of IPS and PLS panels you can pick from:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

And, here's some narrowed down results....

24" 1920x1080 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($150+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

24" 1920x1200 [16:10] IPS/PLS ($200-250+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

27" 1920x1080 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($230+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

27" 2560x1440 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($300 noname / $500 namebrand):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

30" 2560x1600 [16:10] IPS/PLS ($500 noname / $1,000 namebrand)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...)


Lastly here's another option you might want to consider:
IPS/PLS panels that run at 96Hz or 120Hz, like this one:
PLS 27" 2560x1440 [16:9] 96 or 120Hz (~$360)
matte
glossy
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April 12, 2014 11:25:34 AM

Shneiky said:
Almoust all X79 motherboards need a BIOS flash to work with 4820 4930 and 4960 CPUs. All the 2011 motherboards were made for 3820 3930 and 3960/3970 with the promise of the new generation working with only bios update. Anyway, if you get a board with older bios, you just need a USB stick and some very careful, step-by-step reading and execution.

And also: on most Asrock, Asus, MSI, EVGA X79 motherboards there are such rants. All the people that got a problem will post, but just a tiny part of the ones who are happy will write.


Thanks Shneiky. How will I know if I need to update the bios?

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April 12, 2014 12:06:02 PM

Depending on when the motherboard was produced, it may ship with either an older BIOS that does not support the 4000 series I7 or you may get one that supports it. If after assembly, the machine does not boot properly and you hear beeps - than the case is that the motherboard has an older BIOS. If you get the DRAM LED (a LED lamp which indicates problem with the RAM) than that is a certain sign you need the newer BIOS. If you need a new BIOS, you need a USB stick and another laptop/computer with internet. You can download the new BIOS from Asus website. Before you flash the BIOS, be sure to carefully read the instructions and execute them fully and in the correct order. Else you might brick the board. It is not a hard procedure, you just need to do it properly.

P.S Before jumping to conlusions and flashing the BIOS, make sure the problem is not else where - like a loose connection or a cable not plugged in or improperly plugged cables.
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April 12, 2014 8:42:56 PM

KevinAr18 said:
PaoloPaolo said:
Monitor: Asus VE278H 27.0" Monitor ($222.58 @ Newegg)
For image editing and any type of work where you want proper colors on-screen, then I suggest getting either an IPS or PLS type monitor.

Most monitors use a TN panel (like the VE278H). TN panels have worse viewing angles and will result in colors getting worse at any slight angles. Whites will turn brownish if you increase the angle enough. Also, since the corners of the screen are at a different angle to your eye than the center of the screen, that means the colors in the corner of the screen will be a slightly different color than in the center of your screen (something that people who do image editing might notice).
This could also be a problem for multi-monitor use, if you are unable to curve the extra monitors around you. (If, for some reason, you can only setup them up without rotating the two on the ends, then the two TN panels on the end of a 3 monitor setup would probably start showing image quality issues -- a rare case I know, since you can usually rotate them.)

Now, that you know about panel type. Look for an IPS or PLS monitor and then consider these other factors:

* matte vs glossy: Do you want a highly reflective screen or a matte (sandy/rough) looking finish? The glossy has great colors, but can often give you headaches with all the glare it causes. Many people choose matte because of the glare issue.

* 16:9 vs 16:10 -- Many monitors are 1920x1080 (16:9 ratio). However, another popular size is the 1920x1200 (16:10 ratio), which gives you extra vertical space to work with. This extra vertical space costs more, but is very useful when you do productive work on a computer (like you are doing).

* resolution / screen size -- If you get a 27" monitor with a 1920x1080 resolution, chance are that you will begin to notice the bigger pixels. The screen will have this black grid (like a screen door). For a 27" monitor, the ideal resolution is around 2560x1440. For 1920x1080 the max recommend resolution is usually a 24" or 23" so the screen door effect is not as noticeable.
However, to be fair, even at 27" on a 1920x1080 screen, the "screen door" effect is not that bad. I suggest that you check out one in the store... because if it looks ok for you then, the 27" 1080p offers a really cheap option for a large screen size.

So, here's my recommendations:

A general list of IPS and PLS panels you can pick from:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

And, here's some narrowed down results....

24" 1920x1080 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($150+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

24" 1920x1200 [16:10] IPS/PLS ($200-250+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

27" 1920x1080 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($230+):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

27" 2560x1440 [16:9] IPS/PLS ($300 noname / $500 namebrand):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...

30" 2560x1600 [16:10] IPS/PLS ($500 noname / $1,000 namebrand)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=P...)


Lastly here's another option you might want to consider:
IPS/PLS panels that run at 96Hz or 120Hz, like this one:
PLS 27" 2560x1440 [16:9] 96 or 120Hz (~$360)
matte
glossy


Thanks man. These are good options. I plan on purchasing a second monitor. Will review yours for sure.

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April 12, 2014 8:44:22 PM

Shneiky said:
Depending on when the motherboard was produced, it may ship with either an older BIOS that does not support the 4000 series I7 or you may get one that supports it. If after assembly, the machine does not boot properly and you hear beeps - than the case is that the motherboard has an older BIOS. If you get the DRAM LED (a LED lamp which indicates problem with the RAM) than that is a certain sign you need the newer BIOS. If you need a new BIOS, you need a USB stick and another laptop/computer with internet. You can download the new BIOS from Asus website. Before you flash the BIOS, be sure to carefully read the instructions and execute them fully and in the correct order. Else you might brick the board. It is not a hard procedure, you just need to do it properly.

P.S Before jumping to conlusions and flashing the BIOS, make sure the problem is not else where - like a loose connection or a cable not plugged in or improperly plugged cables.


Oh man, thanks! Hope I get a new unit. Otherwise, seems iffy, but I'll do my best!

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April 14, 2014 8:42:00 AM

Here's another question I'm hoping someone can answer, as the forums aren't clear: Do I need to buy a wifi component for this build, to access wifi internet?
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April 14, 2014 3:12:34 PM

PaoloPaolo said:
Thanks man. These are good options. I plan on purchasing a second monitor. Will review yours for sure.

Welcome
PaoloPaolo said:
Here's another question I'm hoping someone can answer, as the forums aren't clear: Do I need to buy a wifi component for this build, to access wifi internet?
If you are interested, here's some PCI Express wifi cards you can install inside the computer (antenna's stick out the back):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...
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April 14, 2014 3:13:52 PM

this question is solved...please do another topic
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April 16, 2014 12:47:35 PM

Shneiky said:
Depending on when the motherboard was produced, it may ship with either an older BIOS that does not support the 4000 series I7 or you may get one that supports it. If after assembly, the machine does not boot properly and you hear beeps - than the case is that the motherboard has an older BIOS. If you get the DRAM LED (a LED lamp which indicates problem with the RAM) than that is a certain sign you need the newer BIOS. If you need a new BIOS, you need a USB stick and another laptop/computer with internet. You can download the new BIOS from Asus website. Before you flash the BIOS, be sure to carefully read the instructions and execute them fully and in the correct order. Else you might brick the board. It is not a hard procedure, you just need to do it properly.

P.S Before jumping to conlusions and flashing the BIOS, make sure the problem is not else where - like a loose connection or a cable not plugged in or improperly plugged cables.


Thanks! Have delivery of all parts except the mobo. Going to try and build it soon!

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!