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Best GPU for AMD FX-6300 Budget?

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April 12, 2014 6:20:18 AM

I'm building my first gaming pc with the FX-6300 and I've been looking on forums for the best graphics card to go with it, most say GTX 760 but that's way out of my price range. I can spend £130 max. I'm looking at MSI Radeon HD 7850 2GB?

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April 12, 2014 6:44:34 AM

Yup that card will work like a charm with your processor although you know you need a atleast 20 amperes on single rail (in multi rail) or 30 amps in the single rail power supply to run your system in stable form.
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April 12, 2014 7:24:31 AM

goku1234567890 said:
Yup that card will work like a charm with your processor although you know you need a atleast 20 amperes on single rail (in multi rail) or 30 amps in the single rail power supply to run your system in stable form.


Please could you explain what that means? Just that I'm a bit of a noob at building PCs :/  Thanks
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a b U Graphics card
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April 12, 2014 7:41:49 AM

See in power supply there is a rail which support and provide current to all the components present in the power supply. Now in rail current is measured in amperes instead of wattage. So in any component specifications there should be wattage consumption written somewhere. Now you don't know if your power supply rail will support it or not so what you do is divide that wattage with 12 to get the amperes, for example hd 7850 consumes 130W so thats make 13 amperes: 130/ 12 = 12.8{13amperes overall}. Now in some power supplies there is 2 rails instead of one to divide the burden so in in case of dual rails there are different amount of amperes like one rail give 20 amps and other give varying amount like 20, 17, 18 amperes. In these cases the rail with the most amperes only give current to processor and the graphic card while the other give current to rest of the components. Same rule apply here you calculate the amount of amperes your graphic card and processor consume and see if it support both your graphic card and processor otherwise your power supply will burn. Remember in this case you can leave other rail and only worry about the one with most ampere cause it the one going to give current to processor and graphic card. Now there is a disadvantage in dual rail too. But that i will explain later.

In you case you have a single rail with 30 amperes. I calculated the ampere consumption of your processor and graphic card and added them which made the total 20 amperes while the 10 amperes is for other components. As for why don't we measure amperes of other components present in the pc that is because they all consume very little amount of ampere like they all will consume 5 to 7 amps max. But in case you cutting on short on amperes you should consider a new power supply. Hope this explained things to you a bit.
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April 12, 2014 11:36:09 AM

goku1234567890 said:
See in power supply there is a rail which support and provide current to all the components present in the power supply. Now in rail current is measured in amperes instead of wattage. So in any component specifications there should be wattage consumption written somewhere. Now you don't know if your power supply rail will support it or not so what you do is divide that wattage with 12 to get the amperes, for example hd 7850 consumes 130W so thats make 13 amperes: 130/ 12 = 12.8{13amperes overall}. Now in some power supplies there is 2 rails instead of one to divide the burden so in in case of dual rails there are different amount of amperes like one rail give 20 amps and other give varying amount like 20, 17, 18 amperes. In these cases the rail with the most amperes only give current to processor and the graphic card while the other give current to rest of the components. Same rule apply here you calculate the amount of amperes your graphic card and processor consume and see if it support both your graphic card and processor otherwise your power supply will burn. Remember in this case you can leave other rail and only worry about the one with most ampere cause it the one going to give current to processor and graphic card. Now there is a disadvantage in dual rail too. But that i will explain later.

In you case you have a single rail with 30 amperes. I calculated the ampere consumption of your processor and graphic card and added them which made the total 20 amperes while the 10 amperes is for other components. As for why don't we measure amperes of other components present in the pc that is because they all consume very little amount of ampere like they all will consume 5 to 7 amps max. But in case you cutting on short on amperes you should consider a new power supply. Hope this explained things to you a bit.


Thanks for explaining, I think I understand now. The total wattage of the build is 340W, so 28 amperes? That's less than 30 so I think that would be ok. The PSU I'm looking at (Corsair
CX430M) is 430W / 36 amperes so I'm guessing this is ok?
Sorry if my thinking is entirely wrong.
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April 12, 2014 12:26:02 PM

Now there is another thing. See there is always a sticker on power supply that tells how much ampere you are getting in +12V rail. These are amperes we see and that is the final ampere. You should keep the count below that and work if it goes above that it is bad and it will burn. And the Corsair CX430M only has 32 amperes on 12V so that is OK.
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April 12, 2014 1:21:48 PM

goku1234567890 said:
Now there is another thing. See there is always a sticker on power supply that tells how much ampere you are getting in +12V rail. These are amperes we see and that is the final ampere. You should keep the count below that and work if it goes above that it is bad and it will burn. And the Corsair CX430M only has 32 amperes on 12V so that is OK.


Thanks for the help, I will be ordering these parts then :) 
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