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MoCA with my Directv House?

We use Directv in our house along with Centurylink internet, and I've been wanting to extend the network for a couple of reasons; one the wifi is spotty is some areas and two I have ethernet only devices such as my AV receiver in rooms that only have coax and power outlets. I was going to go powerline because I had heard MoCA is not possible with Directv or satellite for that matter, but then I saw this video. A guy who has Directv showing how he runs MoCA. It seemed be the simplest thing in the world. I'll put the link of the video once I'm done describing :D Anyways, he has his modem which connects to his router to give his house internet. Easy. Obviously so do I haha! Mines just a Modem/Router combo that Directv gave me. Then he has a device called the Directv Cinema connection kit.... the DCAW1R0-01. I also have it. What it does is pick up my wifi signal and does two things. One, feeds internet to my main receiver/dvr. And two, feeds the connection through a coax cable to the wall and throughout the house so my other directv boxes can access my dvr recordings. Now that sounds like MoCA to me.. but then again I don't know much. The guy in the video claims that since he has this, he already has a MoCA network in his house and therefore its as easy as plugging in his MoCA devices into the wall and into the coax in his walls and he's set to go. If it is as he shows in the video I could do the same thing and have MoCA throughout my house. I've heard stuff about MoCA and Diretv freq.'s being the same and canceling each other out so they don't work. And other things about the coax lines, so I'm just curious about if it'll work. So my question is, can I do it? Haha! Thanks for taking the time to listen to my rambling :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVBEyYlOVqE
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  1. I forgot to mention he was using the Motorola Surfboard
  2. It depends which directtv system you are using. If you are using the newer one wire system where you run multiple receivers on the same wire and just use a special splitter. That one and MoCA do not work at all together. The way directtv makes this work is they divide the bandwidth into chucks and each receiver and the LNB on the dish negotiate which chunks of bandwidth they are going to use. Directtv assumes it can use all of it ..I think it can run 8 receivers. Needless to say this is very similar to what moca is doing and they stomp all over each other.

    The only way you can get this to work is if you only have a single directtv receiver and it only has a single tuner....ie no DVR that can record 2 shows at the same time. This type of system you can trick with a filter into running like the older direct tv systems where each device needed a wire to the dish. Running it that way will allow moca to run on the same cable but then each direct tv box must have its own wire out to the lnb on the dish or at least to a mux that performs the same function.
  3. bill001g said:
    It depends which directtv system you are using. If you are using the newer one wire system where you run multiple receivers on the same wire and just use a special splitter. That one and MoCA do not work at all together. The way directtv makes this work is they divide the bandwidth into chucks and each receiver and the LNB on the dish negotiate which chunks of bandwidth they are going to use. Directtv assumes it can use all of it ..I think it can run 8 receivers. Needless to say this is very similar to what moca is doing and they stomp all over each other.

    The only way you can get this to work is if you only have a single directtv receiver and it only has a single tuner....ie no DVR that can record 2 shows at the same time. This type of system you can trick with a filter into running like the older direct tv systems where each device needed a wire to the dish. Running it that way will allow moca to run on the same cable but then each direct tv box must have its own wire out to the lnb on the dish or at least to a mux that performs the same function.



    So that video was basically useless to me even though we have the same gear?
  4. You can try it if you want but it will only work if you get lucky in effect. Directtv use 900mhz-2.3ghz Moca uses 500mhz-1.6ghz. There is a only a 400mhz area that does not overlap. Hard to say if you can force moca to only use that part. Of course the less bandwidth you can use the slower it will run. Now on top of this there are direct tv receivers that also have their own version of moca called deca so that you can watch video off the internet on your directtv devices. These devices use the 450-650mhz which overlaps the bottom part of moca.

    Can you get it to work....maybe if you work at it long enough and get lucky. Most moca stuff and even directtv swm you have no control over any of the frequencies it is using. It is designed for the people who can't operate a toaster...plug it in and it magically works.
  5. The DirecTV CCK-Ws are just wireless bridges, they used to use Linksys bridges before they branded their own. You should be able to use the any number of CCKs or CCK-Ws to create access points on your Coax network. No additional MoCA is necessary.

    For instance, if your DirecTV system is already connected to your internet, just decide where you want a junction. Stick a SWM Splitter (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=SPLIT2MRV&ss=104346) onto the DirecTV Coax and run a length of coax to a wired CCK (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=DECABB1R0&ss=104350). Run an ethernet cable from the CCK to your switch or AP and boom you should have instant network access.
  6. smitbret said:
    The DirecTV CCK-Ws are just wireless bridges, they used to use Linksys bridges before they branded their own. You should be able to use the any number of CCKs or CCK-Ws to create access points on your Coax network. No additional MoCA is necessary.

    For instance, if your DirecTV system is already connected to your internet, just decide where you want a junction. Stick a SWM Splitter (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=SPLIT2MRV&ss=104346) onto the DirecTV Coax and run a length of coax to a wired CCK (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=DECABB1R0&ss=104350). Run an ethernet cable from the CCK to your switch or AP and boom you should have instant network access.


    So I have a CCK/CCK-W downstairs connected to my my main Directv Box/DVR. Now say I want to to get internet in a bedroom that has a live coax jack and set up for directv, do I need a second CCK to put in that room? I don't know if this helps but the room I am talking about, has access to the DVR recordings from the main Box/DVR downstairs. Thanks for the reply guys!
  7. Eli Heimsoth said:
    smitbret said:
    The DirecTV CCK-Ws are just wireless bridges, they used to use Linksys bridges before they branded their own. You should be able to use the any number of CCKs or CCK-Ws to create access points on your Coax network. No additional MoCA is necessary.

    For instance, if your DirecTV system is already connected to your internet, just decide where you want a junction. Stick a SWM Splitter (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=SPLIT2MRV&ss=104346) onto the DirecTV Coax and run a length of coax to a wired CCK (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=DECABB1R0&ss=104350). Run an ethernet cable from the CCK to your switch or AP and boom you should have instant network access.


    So I have a CCK/CCK-W downstairs connected to my my main Directv Box/DVR. Now say I want to to get internet in a bedroom that has a live coax jack and set up for directv, do I need a second CCK to put in that room? I don't know if this helps but the room I am talking about, has access to the DVR recordings from the main Box/DVR downstairs. Thanks for the reply guys!


    Yes. You'll split the coax off with the splitter I linked and run the 2nd Coax to the CCK. Make sure the Power Pass Through port on the splitter is connecting the Receiver and the wall outlet with the non-power Pass Through going to the CCK. You should have 100Mbps network speeds at that CCK. Keep in mind that DTVs MoCa system is not Gigabit.
  8. smitbret said:
    Eli Heimsoth said:
    smitbret said:
    The DirecTV CCK-Ws are just wireless bridges, they used to use Linksys bridges before they branded their own. You should be able to use the any number of CCKs or CCK-Ws to create access points on your Coax network. No additional MoCA is necessary.

    For instance, if your DirecTV system is already connected to your internet, just decide where you want a junction. Stick a SWM Splitter (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=SPLIT2MRV&ss=104346) onto the DirecTV Coax and run a length of coax to a wired CCK (http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=DECABB1R0&ss=104350). Run an ethernet cable from the CCK to your switch or AP and boom you should have instant network access.


    So I have a CCK/CCK-W downstairs connected to my my main Directv Box/DVR. Now say I want to to get internet in a bedroom that has a live coax jack and set up for directv, do I need a second CCK to put in that room? I don't know if this helps but the room I am talking about, has access to the DVR recordings from the main Box/DVR downstairs. Thanks for the reply guys!


    Yes. You'll split the coax off with the splitter I linked and run the 2nd Coax to the CCK. Make sure the Power Pass Through port on the splitter is connecting the Receiver and the wall outlet with the non-power Pass Through going to the CCK. You should have 100Mbps network speeds at that CCK. Keep in mind that DTVs MoCa system is not Gigabit.

    Forgive me :D but what does it mean that it won't be gigabit? I feel like I should definitely know that
  9. Ethernet speeds are 10Mbps, 100Mbps, 1000Mbps, or 10000Mbps. Gigabit, 1000Mbps, is the standard that most non-business environment are running at or upgrading to.

    So, you'll be limited to 100Mbps at any one time across any point that uses the DirecTV connection. In the real world, it's still faster than most any wireless N connection.

    Gigabit is really not that much more expensive than 100Mbps but 100Mbps is plenty fast for most home uses so the big corporations can save $5/unit by not using Gigabit. $5 x 20 million devices keeps stockholders happy and buys a nice house in Aspen.
  10. Best answer
    Read through the all the post and I have a question that might be obvious but wanted to ask before I invest in the equipment. I believe I have the same set up as Eli and maybe I missed him including it in his question but what if I have the same set up and and have Time Warner Cable providing my internet. Will this set up work?

    I have Direct TV and use a Genie HD DVR (Model – HR34-700) with two Genie Mini’s (Model – C31-700). I have internet coming into the house via Time Warner Cable and use an Arris Touchstone TG862 modem/router (gateway) for my internet connection.
    My internet is coming into the house downstairs and is providing internet to my Genie HD DVR using a Direct TV Broadband DECA Ethernet to Coax Adapter (Generation II).

    My question is can I use another Direct TV Broadbad DECA Ethernet to COAX Adapter upstairs where one of my Genie Mini is and have an Ethernet option for my laptop that I’m currently connected to my network via wireless?
  11. Action1 said:
    Read through the all the post and I have a question that might be obvious but wanted to ask before I invest in the equipment. I believe I have the same set up as Eli and maybe I missed him including it in his question but what if I have the same set up and and have Time Warner Cable providing my internet. Will this set up work?

    I have Direct TV and use a Genie HD DVR (Model – HR34-700) with two Genie Mini’s (Model – C31-700). I have internet coming into the house via Time Warner Cable and use an Arris Touchstone TG862 modem/router (gateway) for my internet connection.
    My internet is coming into the house downstairs and is providing internet to my Genie HD DVR using a Direct TV Broadband DECA Ethernet to Coax Adapter (Generation II).

    My question is can I use another Direct TV Broadbad DECA Ethernet to COAX Adapter upstairs where one of my Genie Mini is and have an Ethernet option for my laptop that I’m currently connected to my network via wireless?


    Are you asking if you can use the Broadband DECA Adapter to pull the network signal off the coax and run a coax to your Laptop. If so, yes, it will work. It's not what it's made for but it will work. They're basically just MoCa adapters.
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