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Will this build work?

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April 16, 2014 7:46:57 AM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3sK8I

And are there any parts I could go down on the price and still have roughly the same performance?

More about : build work

April 16, 2014 7:52:32 AM

thats actually a really good build, but if you are playing cpu-intensive games, (assuming you will game with this) then you may want to OC, and that means you should get a better cooler, like evo 212, for only $30. even if you dont OC, its nice to have a better cooler cuz its quieter, and keeps the cpu temps down a little.
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April 16, 2014 7:56:01 AM

pretty good... looks like you're on the 'best bang for the buck' mission.

I'd check out some raidmax cases on newegg... I really like them for these kinds of builds. you can normally get one loaded with fans for $30 after rebate, and i've had good experiences with them being pretty darn good quality for that price!

if you are looking for a good cooler, newegg has the cooler master 120xl for $55 after rebate right now. that's a steal
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April 16, 2014 8:03:54 AM

Danbuscus25 said:
thats actually a really good build, but if you are playing cpu-intensive games, (assuming you will game with this) then you may want to OC, and that means you should get a better cooler, like evo 212, for only $30. even if you dont OC, its nice to have a better cooler cuz its quieter, and keeps the cpu temps down a little.


Will the cpu be able to run all the games that are out now fairly well?
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Best solution

April 16, 2014 8:16:43 AM

it will run most games on very high-ultra, especially if overclocked. if you have the money though, look at the 8320/8350, or intel.
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April 16, 2014 8:19:51 AM

That isn't the best case in the world in terms of cooling. The Corsair 200R or NZXT Source 210 Elite could be better for a similar price.
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April 16, 2014 8:49:20 AM

that is fine, get the case of your preference.
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April 16, 2014 11:01:09 AM

Danbuscus25 said:
it will run most games on very high-ultra, especially if overclocked. if you have the money though, look at the 8320/8350, or intel.


How exactly does overclocking work? This is my first time looking for a pc.

And thanks for for the information.
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April 16, 2014 11:40:16 AM

ok, overclocking is making a component of your computer run faster than its stock speed. for the cpu, there are 2 ways to overclock: the easy way, and the slightly more hard way. the easy way is you just increase the multiplier of the cpu. for example, you get the 8320, with a stock speed of 3.5 ghz, meaning it has a multiplier of 17.5 (because most cpu's have a front side bus (fsb) of 200 mhz) cuz 200x17.5=3500 mhz. so, if you want to overclock to 4.0ghz, increase the multiplier to 20, cuz 200x20=4000 mhz. however, as you increase the multiplier, you need to increase the voltage aswell. if you are overclocking from 3500mhz to 4000mhz, you probly want to add about 0.075 volts, however you want to overclock in small steps, so i would suggest if you have it clocked at 3.5ghz that you increase multiplier to 18.5 so 18.5x200=3700mhz, and add 0.025 volts. if windows boots, increase it to a multiplier of 20, and increase the voltage by another 0.025. if windows boots, run a stress test like prime95 for a couple hours, and if there are no errors, then it is a stable overclock. if there are any errors, then add another 0.025 volts. if it still doesnt pass the stress test, then lower the multiplier to 19 and remove 0.025 volts, and try again. also, dont let it go over 70c ish, cuz then it will start to age faster. now, the slightly hard way: if a cpu doesnt have an unlocked multiplier, then you increase the fsb from 200 to, say, 215. therefore, 215x17.5=3762.5mhz. then you would add 0.025 volts (if it allows you too), and go into your ram speed, and either lower the frequency by 1 notch, or if the ram isnt at its max rated speed yet, leave it alone (you may need to add some voltage, like 0.025 ish). then, you need to try to get the ht reference clock as close as you can to 2000mhz, and if it has to be either higher or lower, set it to lower than 2000mhz. then run prime95 for a couple hours, and if it passes, and the temp stays under 70c, its good. and btw, you may need to increase the north bridge voltage by a tiny amount, do it by like 1 notch at first and run prime95. and you can do all of this in the bios menu. however, the fx chips come with a mediocre heatsink and fan, so if you decide to OC, i would get an after market cooler, like 212 evo for $30. and only overclock if you notice a significant increase in performance. and that is pretty much it :)  OC'ing might void your warranty though, so keep that in mind if you have a warranty.
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April 16, 2014 12:04:38 PM

Danbuscus25 said:
ok, overclocking is making a component of your computer run faster than its stock speed. for the cpu, there are 2 ways to overclock: the easy way, and the slightly more hard way. the easy way is you just increase the multiplier of the cpu. for example, you get the 8320, with a stock speed of 3.5 ghz, meaning it has a multiplier of 17.5 (because most cpu's have a front side bus (fsb) of 200 mhz) cuz 200x17.5=3500 mhz. so, if you want to overclock to 4.0ghz, increase the multiplier to 20, cuz 200x20=4000 mhz. however, as you increase the multiplier, you need to increase the voltage aswell. if you are overclocking from 3500mhz to 4000mhz, you probly want to add about 0.075 volts, however you want to overclock in small steps, so i would suggest if you have it clocked at 3.5ghz that you increase multiplier to 18.5 so 18.5x200=3700mhz, and add 0.025 volts. if windows boots, increase it to a multiplier of 20, and increase the voltage by another 0.025. if windows boots, run a stress test like prime95 for a couple hours, and if there are no errors, then it is a stable overclock. if there are any errors, then add another 0.025 volts. if it still doesnt pass the stress test, then lower the multiplier to 19 and remove 0.025 volts, and try again. also, dont let it go over 70c ish, cuz then it will start to age faster. now, the slightly hard way: if a cpu doesnt have an unlocked multiplier, then you increase the fsb from 200 to, say, 215. therefore, 215x17.5=3762.5mhz. then you would add 0.025 volts (if it allows you too), and go into your ram speed, and either lower the frequency by 1 notch, or if the ram isnt at its max rated speed yet, leave it alone (you may need to add some voltage, like 0.025 ish). then, you need to try to get the ht reference clock as close as you can to 2000mhz, and if it has to be either higher or lower, set it to lower than 2000mhz. then run prime95 for a couple hours, and if it passes, and the temp stays under 70c, its good. and btw, you may need to increase the north bridge voltage by a tiny amount, do it by like 1 notch at first and run prime95. and you can do all of this in the bios menu. however, the fx chips come with a mediocre heatsink and fan, so if you decide to OC, i would get an after market cooler, like 212 evo for $30. and only overclock if you notice a significant increase in performance. and that is pretty much it :)  OC'ing might void your warranty though, so keep that in mind if you have a warranty.


how much of a difference in performance would I see, if I overclocked my fx 6300 have for games like skyrim, rome total war 2, or battlefield 4
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April 16, 2014 12:45:06 PM

well, with the graphics card in your build, the r9 270, the cpu wont be the bottleneck, but the graphics card will. you can overclock the graphics card, its a lot easier. first, download msi afterburner. then, go into settings and check the box that allows higher overclocks and a voltage increase. then, just move the sliders to the right a bit, and apply changes and test for stability. you can use furrmark, msi kombuster, or whatever gpu stress test you want. if there are no errors within a few minutes, then you can keep moving the sliders. you should move the sliders in increments of 20-30 mhz and test for stability at a time, but for the first increase you can go i bit more than 30 mhz in a single jump. do this for the core clock and memory clock seperatly, and when either becomes unstable, increase the voltage by 0.015-0.025 and test again. when you find the highest stable clock and voltage for both the core clock and the memory clock, set both the core and memory clock to the highest stable point, increase the voltage to the highest it was for the core clock, add about 0.015-0.025 volts, drag the core and memory clock sliders down by about 10 mhz, and run a stress test for a few hours.
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