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How important is a high quality/expensive MOBO for gaming?

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April 16, 2014 2:35:32 PM

My friend at work told me that it's imperative, or extremely crucial to have an excellent, high quality motherboard for gaming, and I should go in around $200. Some people online have recommended MOBOs to me for as low as $99.99, my friend said the PC will only be as good as its weakest part, and putting expensive GPUs and CPUs into a cheap MOBO doesn't make sense. Is there truth to this? For a high powered/quality rig, do I need a $200+ MOBO? I've been looking at the MSI Z87-G45 ($169.99 CAD), and the ASUS Z87-PRO LGA 1150 ($220.99 CAD). Both seem good, and are pricey, but I don't want to squander money if I don't have to.

I'm looking at an Intel I5 4670k or I7 4770k (leaning toward the I5) and an Nvidia GTX 770 or 780 (not sure which yet). I have a budget of around $1,800-$2,000 but I will also need anti virus (probs Bit Defender because it's not too taxing on performance), an OS (probs Windows 7), and a monitor.
Thank you for your time.

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a b 4 Gaming
a c 129 V Motherboard
April 16, 2014 2:44:19 PM

Back in the day, Boards made more of a difference because they had the AGP/PCI-E controller and memory controller on the board it self. The newer Intel setups have the memory and PCI-E controller in the cpu. This means the performance from board to board is almost always due to slight bios tweaks from the maker.

Now this is not to say more expensive boards do not have more features(extra or better network/data controllers controllers ect) or better parts. If you are going to overclock or want better sound, you will be paying for a better power delivery system and audio system.

I see no reason why a 100-150 dollar board would be unsuitable for a modern gaming system.

Many games still do not use the extra threads from an I7 vs and I5.

Going overly cheap can cause some issues down the line if they cheap out of the power system because gaming systems tend to run med-high loads for long periods of time. At some point you go into overkill.
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April 16, 2014 2:57:33 PM

nukemaster said:
Back in the day, Boards made more of a difference because they had the AGP/PCI-E controller and memory controller on the board it self. The newer Intel setups have the memory and PCI-E controller in the cpu. This means the performance from board to board is almost always due to slight bios tweaks from the maker.

Now this is not to say more expensive boards do not have more features(extra or better network/data controllers controllers ect) or better parts. If you are going to overclock or want better sound, you will be paying for a better power delivery system and audio system.

I see no reason why a 100-150 dollar board would be unsuitable for a modern gaming system.

Many games still do not use the extra threads from an I7 vs and I5.

Going overly cheap can cause some issues down the line if they cheap out of the power system because gaming systems tend to run med-high loads for long periods of time. At some point you go into overkill.


This is the kind of detailed answer I was looking for from Tom's Hardware, sometimes hard to get at Yahoo Answers. Thank you so much! I think I will go for the MOBO that is around $169.99 to be safe.
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 129 V Motherboard
April 16, 2014 3:26:57 PM

You can always start a thread in the Systems forum following this format to get lots of idea's of what parts to use.

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April 16, 2014 4:12:49 PM

nukemaster said:
You can always start a thread in the Systems forum following this format to get lots of idea's of what parts to use.



Thank you! When I get closer to the purchase date, I will start posting possible builds.
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 17, 2014 8:59:11 AM

Some of the more expensive boards also have some durability features that you might not find on a potentially flimsier sub-$100 board. As an example. My z87 sabertooth board has a metal backplate screwed into the back of the board and in general, in all of the reivews I've read people take about how it is a fairly solidly made board (although I never tested this myself. The maximus vi formula also has this backplate.
As part of ASUS' TUF line of boards the sabertooth also comes with a 5 year warranty, which is more than I've seen on just about any board. The sabertooth is in the $200 range (or it was when I got it, probably on sale) while the formula is closer to the $300 range.

I'm not saying that all of these things are worth spending the high prices for those boards (the sabertooth's thermal armor is a bit gimmicky and the formula just seemed overpriced), but to a certain extent you get what you pay for
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April 17, 2014 9:41:33 AM

Get the best motherboard you can that supports what you want. Low priced boards usually have less options and
cheaper parts as well as disabled functions on them. The board is the foundation of your computer. Start with the
best one you can.
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April 17, 2014 10:09:41 AM

mc962 said:
Some of the more expensive boards also have some durability features that you might not find on a potentially flimsier sub-$100 board. As an example. My z87 sabertooth board has a metal backplate screwed into the back of the board and in general, in all of the reivews I've read people take about how it is a fairly solidly made board (although I never tested this myself. The maximus vi formula also has this backplate.
As part of ASUS' TUF line of boards the sabertooth also comes with a 5 year warranty, which is more than I've seen on just about any board. The sabertooth is in the $200 range (or it was when I got it, probably on sale) while the formula is closer to the $300 range.

I'm not saying that all of these things are worth spending the high prices for those boards (the sabertooth's thermal armor is a bit gimmicky and the formula just seemed overpriced), but to a certain extent you get what you pay for


I will definitely look at those. I want to avoid paying big bucks where possible, but I also don't want to spend $1,500+ on a rig, then have to worry about a part, especially as crucial as the motherboard, breaking down.
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April 17, 2014 10:11:39 AM

Ronshere said:
Get the best motherboard you can that supports what you want. Low priced boards usually have less options and
cheaper parts as well as disabled functions on them. The board is the foundation of your computer. Start with the
best one you can.


The z87 Maximum VI Hero is out of my original price range, but I've been learning more about MOBOs, and am willing to postone the purchase and build of my PC for better parts that will ensure high quality and functionality overall. Is the Maximus VI Hero enough? I was originally going for one around $169.99.
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 17, 2014 10:38:14 AM

More than enough probably. It might have better integrated sound or give slightly more stable overclocks, but for the most part something along the lines of z87-a, -plus, or -pro would probably suit you just fine.

*Looking at it now it looks like the big thing is integrated sound capabilities and, because it's a ROG board, probably better overclocking. There might be more PCIe slots than lower end boards as well if sli/crossfire is your thing.
Other than that, I would recommend ASUS boards because I've had good experiences with them. But in the end with a lot of boards at a certain price point ($150+) it's more about "what features do I get?" and "what features do I NEED?"
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April 17, 2014 9:38:33 PM

mc962 said:
More than enough probably. It might have better integrated sound or give slightly more stable overclocks, but for the most part something along the lines of z87-a, -plus, or -pro would probably suit you just fine.

*Looking at it now it looks like the big thing is integrated sound capabilities and, because it's a ROG board, probably better overclocking. There might be more PCIe slots than lower end boards as well if sli/crossfire is your thing.
Other than that, I would recommend ASUS boards because I've had good experiences with them. But in the end with a lot of boards at a certain price point ($150+) it's more about "what features do I get?" and "what features do I NEED?"


Interesting argument for the MOBOs, in that case, would you say $100-$150 is good but not amazing? I care mostly about being able to game well, I'm not a pro gamer, but I intend to replace console gaming with PC gaming, and want to play all the RTS and turn based strategy games, as well as some RPGs and FPSs like Planetside 2 and Watchdogs (open world 3rd person I guess?). Sound is nice, but not that big of a deal for me... Not sure what other features the pricey boards will offer though. Is there a good place to learn about motherboards?
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 6:34:06 AM

Google mostly, this site also probably has some good articles lying around.
If your board has all the features you need then there is no need for more unless you want to pay for that potential for more. But part of my philosophy was that chances are there will be less bad boards in the $150-200 range than in the lower range, because companies wouldnt want the bad press for making people spend $200 on a faulty board. You definitely probably don't need the features of the $300ish maximus vi formula (unless you want the looks), but a case could be made for the sabertooth for its 5 year warranty, and maybe some other expensive board has something you want. You just have to pay for it if you really want it.

One other thing to keep in mind. A lot of times from what I have seen micro atx boards are cheaper than their atx counterparts. The main difference is often less slots, but if you only use 1 gpu you won't need so many anyway. The z87 gryphon is one such example
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April 18, 2014 9:48:41 AM

mc962 said:
Google mostly, this site also probably has some good articles lying around.
If your board has all the features you need then there is no need for more unless you want to pay for that potential for more. But part of my philosophy was that chances are there will be less bad boards in the $150-200 range than in the lower range, because companies wouldnt want the bad press for making people spend $200 on a faulty board. You definitely probably don't need the features of the $300ish maximus vi formula (unless you want the looks), but a case could be made for the sabertooth for its 5 year warranty, and maybe some other expensive board has something you want. You just have to pay for it if you really want it.

One other thing to keep in mind. A lot of times from what I have seen micro atx boards are cheaper than their atx counterparts. The main difference is often less slots, but if you only use 1 gpu you won't need so many anyway. The z87 gryphon is one such example


I guess my problem is that I don't really know exactly what it is that I need. I agree with your philosophy, as I am obviously ignorant on this topic, I was going to go for the Z87 G45 or whatever it's called, for $169.99. That seemed like a good mid range price haha. I don't care at all about looks, I won't be looking inside the computer that often, except to clean out dust and make sure nothing is loose. Aesthetics don't matter much to me, one person recommended a $59.99 case with no paint on the inside, I'm completely fine with that as long as it has good airflow and things will be kept cool.

Is a 5 year warranty worth the extra money? I mean it's nice and all, but do motherboards tend to fail after 3-5 years? I guess that is a pretty long time actually.
About slots, I would like the option to do the SLI thing in the future, I have heard it sometimes doesn't work out so well, so I don't know if I would actually go with it, I would consider it. For a year or two, at least, I'd go with one GPU. Especially if I decided to go with the GTX 780, I don't think I'd need much more for a long time.
I will check the Z87 Gryphon out, thank you.
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 12:56:42 PM

Some people need 10+ sata ports and a bunch of I/O ports like esata, a pile of usb 3, etc. For me, I don't have any usb or esata devices, and I doubt I will ever get above 5 sata devices, ever. Number of pci slots is important. You want enough of the faster pci slots to be able to support multiple gpu if you want sli. You might also want even more slots for things like a wireless card since many boards don't come with wireless capabilities.

It doesnt sound like you are looking for much in terms of what goes on the board, and, even though I made the argument for it you probably don't need the 5 year warranty. I was just trying to present a different angle.

I'd definitely recommend the z87 gryphon. I have it's larger atx sized cousin and it works great. And Asus in general seems to make good products. Plus you get some decent extra software and a nicely organized BIOS. *Just keep in mind that it does not come with the thermal armor that you might see on it and the sabertooth. However, for me I was more interested in the backplate than the armor


**Since the gryphon is a micro atx board, I don't know if space might be an issue if you have some fat gpu sitting on there (I never worried since I have an atx with a relatively thin gpu). Something you should look into if that's a consideration for you
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April 18, 2014 2:01:59 PM

mc962 said:
Some people need 10+ sata ports and a bunch of I/O ports like esata, a pile of usb 3, etc. For me, I don't have any usb or esata devices, and I doubt I will ever get above 5 sata devices, ever. Number of pci slots is important. You want enough of the faster pci slots to be able to support multiple gpu if you want sli. You might also want even more slots for things like a wireless card since many boards don't come with wireless capabilities.

It doesnt sound like you are looking for much in terms of what goes on the board, and, even though I made the argument for it you probably don't need the 5 year warranty. I was just trying to present a different angle.

I'd definitely recommend the z87 gryphon. I have it's larger atx sized cousin and it works great. And Asus in general seems to make good products. Plus you get some decent extra software and a nicely organized BIOS. *Just keep in mind that it does not come with the thermal armor that you might see on it and the sabertooth. However, for me I was more interested in the backplate than the armor


**Since the gryphon is a micro atx board, I don't know if space might be an issue if you have some fat gpu sitting on there (I never worried since I have an atx with a relatively thin gpu). Something you should look into if that's a consideration for you


Having an SLI option would be nice just in case, but I don't know if I'd ever try SLIing. A wireless card might be necessary, as I have yet to check for an Ethernet connection in my room. I will only be putting a CPU, GPU, and HDD in at first. Maybe a sound and wireless card if I need them to enjoy online gaming, and sound haha. I need to be able to use one monitor, either 720p or 1080p.... I can't think of anything else I need though :/ .

People often recommend Asus, among other brands, so I think you're right. How much was the board you have? I'm assuming bigger means better? The size doesn't bother me, UNLESS, it will be an issue for the components. Do I need a big motherboard for a big GPU?

I don't even really know what a BIOS is, or what you do with it. I know you can use it for overclocking, and maybe monitor your system.... Not sure what else though.
Does a thermal plate help manage heat? Or does it make it stronger/sturdier?
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 129 V Motherboard
April 18, 2014 2:06:45 PM

The size of the board does not effect the video card you can use, but does open up most slots for expansion, If you are getting an ATX case, get and ATX board if you are getting a mATX case, get an mATX board. and so on.

The small end of the board spectrum :)  mitx


Idea of size, that is a 120mm fan and notebook hard drive.


The bios is the basic input/output system. It startup the system and tells it to load the OS. It is used for pre OS configuration. This includes memory/cpu and other speed settings.

Most systems are fine with the Default settings, but for overclockers, the more features/settings the better.

EDIT haha, read thermal paste not thermal plate :) 

The thermal paste is what helps aid the heat transfer from a heat generating component to its heatsink. While some are better than others, many are within a few degrees of one another, for overclocking you want the best you can get, but at stock speeds, it does not matter as much.
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 3:14:57 PM

It might be a bit more cramped with a small case and stuff. But not to the point where stuff doesnt get (assuming you don't have some massive cooler. My board was probably around $220 when i got it I think, but it was on sale/part of a combo pack. If you don't need the extra space and still want the type of board I suggested then I would probably say get the gryphon.

The backplate ,from what I heard, in theory helps with transferring heat, but I liked it because of the added rigidity to the board and it left places for my hands during building
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April 18, 2014 6:03:42 PM

nukemaster said:
The size of the board does not effect the video card you can use, but does open up most slots for expansion, If you are getting an ATX case, get and ATX board if you are getting a mATX case, get an mATX board. and so on.

The small end of the board spectrum :)  mitx


Idea of size, that is a 120mm fan and notebook hard drive.


The bios is the basic input/output system. It startup the system and tells it to load the OS. It is used for pre OS configuration. This includes memory/cpu and other speed settings.

Most systems are fine with the Default settings, but for overclockers, the more features/settings the better.

EDIT haha, read thermal paste not thermal plate :) 

The thermal paste is what helps aid the heat transfer from a heat generating component to its heatsink. While some are better than others, many are within a few degrees of one another, for overclocking you want the best you can get, but at stock speeds, it does not matter as much.


Damn.... That first picture is awfully confusing looking haha, that actual building of the PC should be interesting and challenging.... Are components usually fragile? Choosing the a motherboard sounds much easier if their model sizes correspond with case sizes. ATX seems to be the most common I see or that is recommended to me.

I see.... So you access the BIOS by hitting one of the function buttons at the top of the keyboard? I see now how useful it can be, it gives you complete command over the CPU and GPU... Handy. I've always relied on default settings. It would be fun to tinker with the BIOS once I feel more competent.

Ahhh yes, thermal paste, people often recommend purchasing some alongside a build, because you can get higher quality paste for good prices, and components usually come with enough for one application, whether you screw up or not. Now that I know what it does, I see how important the paste can be. I've seen it as low as $8 and as high as $30 or so.
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April 18, 2014 6:05:11 PM

mc962 said:
It might be a bit more cramped with a small case and stuff. But not to the point where stuff doesnt get (assuming you don't have some massive cooler. My board was probably around $220 when i got it I think, but it was on sale/part of a combo pack. If you don't need the extra space and still want the type of board I suggested then I would probably say get the gryphon.

The backplate ,from what I heard, in theory helps with transferring heat, but I liked it because of the added rigidity to the board and it left places for my hands during building


The Gryphon does seem to be highly recommended, I will keep reading about it and take it into consideration. Thank you!
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 7:07:36 PM

$30 would be a waste. I bought a tube for $8 and some even consider that high. I believe the stuff that comes with hyper 212 evo (if you get that cooler) is sufficient, and noctua gives some good stuff with their coolers. Havent heard great things about the stuff that comes with the stock coolers.

The components are fragile, and yet, surprisingly durable. My psu has an extremely annoying design for the ends of its cables where the half the time you have to practically jump on it to make it go in all the way. I'm still surprised putting in the 24 pin power didnt just snap off that chunk of the board. That is another reason why I could see having more durability as a plus. Hard drives are fairly durable if you don't drop it and same with gpu cards and ram as long as you don't scratch the gold ends. Cpu is pretty hard to damage as long as you don't scratch the gold numbs on the bottom. The most fragile bit is probably the board itself (and that is probably because there are just so many little things that can snap off). However I have dropped a screwdriver point down right on a board before and everything worked fine, so they arent quite as fragile as you might think.

ATX is most common probably because that is the size that a lot of people like to get so they can fit all their stuff comfortably. I'm sure there is some other complex reason but in the end the main difference is just how space and ports you get.


A good thing about ASUS BIOS is that they have an easy and advanced mode. The easy mode lets you adjust the really basic stuff like date/time, as well as changing the boot order for your peripherals (needed when installing the OS). The advanced mode lets you do the tinkering. But you can play with the easy mode and get a feel for things before getting lost in the advanced mode. *I would recommend you have a usb mouse and keyboard available at first start up because they don't always work the first time in BIOS (I was fortunate enough that windows had a screen keyboard that I could use my mouse with to activate until I got the driver installed).
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 7:19:37 PM

The question asked in the title of this post says how important is a high quality expensive motherboard for gaming? The answer to the first part (high quality) is quite important. You want it to last.
An H81 ASUS board is 'high quality' in that respect. Low on Frills with only 2X SATA 6g/s ports, but it will Game just fine.
The second part says 'expensive'; Also not required. I have an ASUS
H87m-plus. I guarantee it scores the same bench marks as an H81 board with my locked i5 cpu.
Save the money if building a games and email pc; buy the cheap asus board.
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a b 4 Gaming
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April 18, 2014 7:45:07 PM

tea urchin said:
The question asked in the title of this post says how important is a high quality expensive motherboard for gaming? The answer to the first part (high quality) is quite important. You want it to last.
An H81 ASUS board is 'high quality' in that respect. Low on Frills with only 2X SATA 6g/s ports, but it will Game just fine.
The second part says 'expensive'; Also not required. I have an ASUS
H87m-plus. I guarantee it scores the same bench marks as an H81 board with my locked i5 cpu.
Save the money if building a games and email pc; buy the cheap asus board.


It was also mentioned that a k cpu would be purchased, assuming overclocking then a z87 board would be appropriate (although I will admit I don't remember seeing overclocking mentioned). Personally I need at least 3 sata ports for the peripherals and drives I wanted (1 ssd, 1 HDD, 1 DVD drive)

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April 18, 2014 9:48:35 PM

mc962 said:
$30 would be a waste. I bought a tube for $8 and some even consider that high. I believe the stuff that comes with hyper 212 evo (if you get that cooler) is sufficient, and noctua gives some good stuff with their coolers. Havent heard great things about the stuff that comes with the stock coolers.

The components are fragile, and yet, surprisingly durable. My psu has an extremely annoying design for the ends of its cables where the half the time you have to practically jump on it to make it go in all the way. I'm still surprised putting in the 24 pin power didnt just snap off that chunk of the board. That is another reason why I could see having more durability as a plus. Hard drives are fairly durable if you don't drop it and same with gpu cards and ram as long as you don't scratch the gold ends. Cpu is pretty hard to damage as long as you don't scratch the gold numbs on the bottom. The most fragile bit is probably the board itself (and that is probably because there are just so many little things that can snap off). However I have dropped a screwdriver point down right on a board before and everything worked fine, so they arent quite as fragile as you might think.

ATX is most common probably because that is the size that a lot of people like to get so they can fit all their stuff comfortably. I'm sure there is some other complex reason but in the end the main difference is just how space and ports you get.


A good thing about ASUS BIOS is that they have an easy and advanced mode. The easy mode lets you adjust the really basic stuff like date/time, as well as changing the boot order for your peripherals (needed when installing the OS). The advanced mode lets you do the tinkering. But you can play with the easy mode and get a feel for things before getting lost in the advanced mode. *I would recommend you have a usb mouse and keyboard available at first start up because they don't always work the first time in BIOS (I was fortunate enough that windows had a screen keyboard that I could use my mouse with to activate until I got the driver installed).


Hmmm, the EVO 212 is the one I am planning on going with, it seems everyone recommends that one. In that case, I will try to find out what kind of thermal paste comes with it, and see if I can order some extra.

Fragile adds to the fears I have haha, I want to build a good, solid gaming rig, and do it myself.... But I'm so afraid of ordering parts and damaging them, or receiving faulty parts, spending hours putting the machine together, only to find that something doesn't work, then try to figure out what, and disassemble the computer and ship the broken part(s) back.
Damn... That sounds both frustrating and worrying, that you have to be so forceful with it just to get it to work.
I see, so the GPUs, CPUs, and RAM all have the "important" parts easily distinguishable? I will be certain to be very careful with all the parts. I am tired of relying on companies like Dell, to build rigs for me... I a bought a "gaming" laptop when I was 16 from Dell, $2,000 and it could barely run Mass Effect on the lowest settings, at the time it had some Nvidia 256Mb GPU. I will NEVER do that again.
I'll take all you say into consideration when building myself. It's good to know that the components aren't so easily breakable, but still need to be handled properly.

So, ATX towers are mostly mid sized towers I take it? Not too big, but enough room for everything the user purchased. The most important thing for me in a case is the airflow and spaciousness, and then secondly, the USB ports and other ports.

So, the BIOS is sounding really cool, but could you possibly screw something up beyond repair by tampering with it? I will almost certainly be sticking to USB only things.

Are you a gamer? Do you have a gaming rig?
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 129 V Motherboard
April 18, 2014 9:50:58 PM

MrCanEHdian said:
nukemaster said:
The size of the board does not effect the video card you can use, but does open up most slots for expansion, If you are getting an ATX case, get and ATX board if you are getting a mATX case, get an mATX board. and so on.

The small end of the board spectrum :)  mitx
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800x600q90/822/mrul.jpg

Idea of size, that is a 120mm fan and notebook hard drive.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800x600q90/341/sg05hddfloor.jpg

The bios is the basic input/output system. It startup the system and tells it to load the OS. It is used for pre OS configuration. This includes memory/cpu and other speed settings.

Most systems are fine with the Default settings, but for overclockers, the more features/settings the better.

EDIT haha, read thermal paste not thermal plate :) 

The thermal paste is what helps aid the heat transfer from a heat generating component to its heatsink. While some are better than others, many are within a few degrees of one another, for overclocking you want the best you can get, but at stock speeds, it does not matter as much.


Damn.... That first picture is awfully confusing looking haha, that actual building of the PC should be interesting and challenging.... Are components usually fragile? Choosing the a motherboard sounds much easier if their model sizes correspond with case sizes. ATX seems to be the most common I see or that is recommended to me.

I see.... So you access the BIOS by hitting one of the function buttons at the top of the keyboard? I see now how useful it can be, it gives you complete command over the CPU and GPU... Handy. I've always relied on default settings. It would be fun to tinker with the BIOS once I feel more competent.

Ahhh yes, thermal paste, people often recommend purchasing some alongside a build, because you can get higher quality paste for good prices, and components usually come with enough for one application, whether you screw up or not. Now that I know what it does, I see how important the paste can be. I've seen it as low as $8 and as high as $30 or so.

That first image was when the case needed a bit of work, but I did not want to loose use of that system since it stores all of my files :) . It normally looks like this(not going to clutter your thread with any more images so it is a link to the image)

For sure go ATX if you get an ATX case. It has the most expansion slots and generally has all the toys. I have been building more smaller pc's because integration and larger hard drives(and network storage helps too) now mean I can get more in less space. It is a trade off and not a good idea for all users. Starting ATX will give you all the expansion you could want vs starting smaller and wishing you have more room down the road.
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April 18, 2014 9:51:16 PM

tea urchin said:
The question asked in the title of this post says how important is a high quality expensive motherboard for gaming? The answer to the first part (high quality) is quite important. You want it to last.
An H81 ASUS board is 'high quality' in that respect. Low on Frills with only 2X SATA 6g/s ports, but it will Game just fine.
The second part says 'expensive'; Also not required. I have an ASUS
H87m-plus. I guarantee it scores the same bench marks as an H81 board with my locked i5 cpu.
Save the money if building a games and email pc; buy the cheap asus board.


Damn! That first one you mentioned has a very low cost! I think someone once referred me to it with a mock build example. So, for gaming, you don't need the extra "frills"? I guess what I should ask is, what do you need in terms of motherboard, for gaming?
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April 18, 2014 9:53:34 PM

mc962 said:
tea urchin said:
The question asked in the title of this post says how important is a high quality expensive motherboard for gaming? The answer to the first part (high quality) is quite important. You want it to last.
An H81 ASUS board is 'high quality' in that respect. Low on Frills with only 2X SATA 6g/s ports, but it will Game just fine.
The second part says 'expensive'; Also not required. I have an ASUS
H87m-plus. I guarantee it scores the same bench marks as an H81 board with my locked i5 cpu.
Save the money if building a games and email pc; buy the cheap asus board.


It was also mentioned that a k cpu would be purchased, assuming overclocking then a z87 board would be appropriate (although I will admit I don't remember seeing overclocking mentioned). Personally I need at least 3 sata ports for the peripherals and drives I wanted (1 ssd, 1 HDD, 1 DVD drive)



Overclocking is something I have zero experience in, but it's something I may want to try in the future, and would therefore be wanting a motherboard capable of it. So sata ports are used for those drives? Anything else? What do you plug the GPU/CPU into and do you need a lot of those?
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April 18, 2014 9:55:35 PM

nukemaster said:
MrCanEHdian said:
nukemaster said:
The size of the board does not effect the video card you can use, but does open up most slots for expansion, If you are getting an ATX case, get and ATX board if you are getting a mATX case, get an mATX board. and so on.

The small end of the board spectrum :)  mitx
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800x600q90/822/mrul.jpg

Idea of size, that is a 120mm fan and notebook hard drive.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800x600q90/341/sg05hddfloor.jpg

The bios is the basic input/output system. It startup the system and tells it to load the OS. It is used for pre OS configuration. This includes memory/cpu and other speed settings.

Most systems are fine with the Default settings, but for overclockers, the more features/settings the better.

EDIT haha, read thermal paste not thermal plate :) 

The thermal paste is what helps aid the heat transfer from a heat generating component to its heatsink. While some are better than others, many are within a few degrees of one another, for overclocking you want the best you can get, but at stock speeds, it does not matter as much.


Damn.... That first picture is awfully confusing looking haha, that actual building of the PC should be interesting and challenging.... Are components usually fragile? Choosing the a motherboard sounds much easier if their model sizes correspond with case sizes. ATX seems to be the most common I see or that is recommended to me.

I see.... So you access the BIOS by hitting one of the function buttons at the top of the keyboard? I see now how useful it can be, it gives you complete command over the CPU and GPU... Handy. I've always relied on default settings. It would be fun to tinker with the BIOS once I feel more competent.

Ahhh yes, thermal paste, people often recommend purchasing some alongside a build, because you can get higher quality paste for good prices, and components usually come with enough for one application, whether you screw up or not. Now that I know what it does, I see how important the paste can be. I've seen it as low as $8 and as high as $30 or so.

That first image was when the case needed a bit of work, but I did not want to loose use of that system since it stores all of my files :) . It normally looks like this(not going to clutter your thread with any more images so it is a link to the image)

For sure go ATX if you get an ATX case. It has the most expansion slots and generally has all the toys. I have been building more smaller pc's because integration and larger hard drives(and network storage helps too) now mean I can get more in less space. It is a trade off and not a good idea for all users. Starting ATX will give you all the expansion you could want vs starting smaller and wishing you have more room down the road.


It's cleaner haha, less intimidating. I think you're right, ATX would be best for me. Thank you :) .
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April 19, 2014 8:33:07 AM

For the most part, all you need is some sata ports (I doubt you will ever need more than the 4-5 that are usually offered on most boards), a usb header (a slot where you hook up the the front usb ports of your case to the board), and whatever comes on the back I/O section. Basically, somewhere to put in your keyboard/mice and peripherals, and a pcie slot for your gpu. Everything else is generally extra, and it is up to you to decide if you want to pay for it. I decided I wanted to pay for my z87 sabertooth, knowing that there were definitely some frills that I didn't absolutely need but wanted.
As far as bad parts, if you order from some good sites like amazon and newegg they generally have good return policies, although you want to get all your parts at the same time so you don't miss the return window on something because you were waiting for your RAM or something to come in. Although with that budget that probably shouldnt be a problem. Also microcenter has some good cpu/board bundle deals if you can get to one

As far as difficulty of getting things in, I 'm pretty sure it was more of an issue with my particular psu (corsair ax 760) than psu cords in general. It's a great psu, but the cords could definitely have been better designed. And everything worked perfectly in the end so I'm not too bitter about it.

And, as I said before, the parts are often much more durable than you give them credit for, short of physically snapping something off or gouging a hole somewhere you probably won't break something assuming it worked in the first place. I definitely had a few moments when building when I probably wasnt so kind to my board but it still treats me well.

Generally as long as it isnt the board that is broken you won't have to disassemble the whole computer, just take out that part and send it back.

While it might be possible to screw things up beyond repair in BIOS, it's not so easy as long as you don't touch things you arent sure about. So you might want to keep your hands off the overclocking settings until you know more about them. And, since you have the easy mode that I mentioned (at least with asus), then you don't generally need to touch them unless you are getting some weird error that requires some error messing. I believe the BIOS also has safeguards that will shut down the computer if you mess something up too bad as well (although I have never needed to test such a thing). The real issue with BIOS is generally with updating. Sometimes you need to update the BIOS (for stuff like hardware compatibility, especially with a cpu sometimes). However, if the power is interrupted while you are updating you could potentially break the board, which is the reason many only say to update the BIOS when needed. I personally have never had issues with the several BIOS updates I've done, and you can avoid most power issues by getting a good psu and investing in an Uninterruptible Power Supply. I'd probably recommend updating the BIOS after you first build everything if it's out of date and then just leave it after that if you don't have issues. But it's your decision there.

SATA ports are used for drives (hard drive, disc drive), a few cpu coolers like the h100i, i believe corsair's i series psu also use them, and a few other peripherals. For you however, it will likely be no more than 3, for an ssd, an hdd, and a disc drive.

The cpu fits into the cpu socket (the really obivous looking square thing). This is probably the bit you want to be most careful about. The way the cpu works is that the gold nubs come into contact with the large amount of pins in the cpu socket. However these pins can be fragile, and if you snap them then the cpu might not work. Stores also don't like returns with this kind of damage so you would likely need to pay the manufacturer to fix it (I think I heard of ASUS repairing a socket for $50). But if you are careful then you should be just fine (even my fairly clumsy hands didn't manage to damage anything. The RAM fits into the long rectangular slots right next to the cpu socket ((generally 4) long slots, fairly obvious as well). Stuff like the dedicated gpu (and anything else that utilizes pci like wireless cards), fit into the pci slots that take up most of the other area on the board and are more widely spread apart. Generally you want the gpu to go into the faster pcie 3.0 slot (marked in your manual), and other stuff that doesnt need as much should go into the slower slots (if you have it.)

Also, a lot of these parts have markings on them so you know how to put them. The cpu has some indents on the chip that line up with some nubs on the edge of the socket. The RAM has an indent that lines up with a nub in the ram slot and pci is similar. Watch this for more info: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuGwPnWrpow
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April 20, 2014 1:47:31 PM

mc962 said:
For the most part, all you need is some sata ports (I doubt you will ever need more than the 4-5 that are usually offered on most boards), a usb header (a slot where you hook up the the front usb ports of your case to the board), and whatever comes on the back I/O section. Basically, somewhere to put in your keyboard/mice and peripherals, and a pcie slot for your gpu. Everything else is generally extra, and it is up to you to decide if you want to pay for it. I decided I wanted to pay for my z87 sabertooth, knowing that there were definitely some frills that I didn't absolutely need but wanted.
As far as bad parts, if you order from some good sites like amazon and newegg they generally have good return policies, although you want to get all your parts at the same time so you don't miss the return window on something because you were waiting for your RAM or something to come in. Although with that budget that probably shouldnt be a problem. Also microcenter has some good cpu/board bundle deals if you can get to one

As far as difficulty of getting things in, I 'm pretty sure it was more of an issue with my particular psu (corsair ax 760) than psu cords in general. It's a great psu, but the cords could definitely have been better designed. And everything worked perfectly in the end so I'm not too bitter about it.

And, as I said before, the parts are often much more durable than you give them credit for, short of physically snapping something off or gouging a hole somewhere you probably won't break something assuming it worked in the first place. I definitely had a few moments when building when I probably wasnt so kind to my board but it still treats me well.

Generally as long as it isnt the board that is broken you won't have to disassemble the whole computer, just take out that part and send it back.

While it might be possible to screw things up beyond repair in BIOS, it's not so easy as long as you don't touch things you arent sure about. So you might want to keep your hands off the overclocking settings until you know more about them. And, since you have the easy mode that I mentioned (at least with asus), then you don't generally need to touch them unless you are getting some weird error that requires some error messing. I believe the BIOS also has safeguards that will shut down the computer if you mess something up too bad as well (although I have never needed to test such a thing). The real issue with BIOS is generally with updating. Sometimes you need to update the BIOS (for stuff like hardware compatibility, especially with a cpu sometimes). However, if the power is interrupted while you are updating you could potentially break the board, which is the reason many only say to update the BIOS when needed. I personally have never had issues with the several BIOS updates I've done, and you can avoid most power issues by getting a good psu and investing in an Uninterruptible Power Supply. I'd probably recommend updating the BIOS after you first build everything if it's out of date and then just leave it after that if you don't have issues. But it's your decision there.

SATA ports are used for drives (hard drive, disc drive), a few cpu coolers like the h100i, i believe corsair's i series psu also use them, and a few other peripherals. For you however, it will likely be no more than 3, for an ssd, an hdd, and a disc drive.

The cpu fits into the cpu socket (the really obivous looking square thing). This is probably the bit you want to be most careful about. The way the cpu works is that the gold nubs come into contact with the large amount of pins in the cpu socket. However these pins can be fragile, and if you snap them then the cpu might not work. Stores also don't like returns with this kind of damage so you would likely need to pay the manufacturer to fix it (I think I heard of ASUS repairing a socket for $50). But if you are careful then you should be just fine (even my fairly clumsy hands didn't manage to damage anything. The RAM fits into the long rectangular slots right next to the cpu socket ((generally 4) long slots, fairly obvious as well). Stuff like the dedicated gpu (and anything else that utilizes pci like wireless cards), fit into the pci slots that take up most of the other area on the board and are more widely spread apart. Generally you want the gpu to go into the faster pcie 3.0 slot (marked in your manual), and other stuff that doesnt need as much should go into the slower slots (if you have it.)

Also, a lot of these parts have markings on them so you know how to put them. The cpu has some indents on the chip that line up with some nubs on the edge of the socket. The RAM has an indent that lines up with a nub in the ram slot and pci is similar. Watch this for more info: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuGwPnWrpow


I will look for all of that then! Do all motherboards above $120 or so have PCIe 3.0? I need to find a good case, with good airflow, not too expensive, and has the ability to support enough USBs... It seems to be tricky to find haha. 99% of the time I look for or at hardware, I go to Newegg, I'm glad you approve of their website! I'll definitely only order when I'm ready, and order all at once... Still, it's tempting to take advantage of deals now.
I didn't know about Microcenter, I will check it out, any deals would be very nice.

It's good to know the parts aren't so fragile, I watched a few videos from LinusTechTips, and can see that you can handle them pretty normally. Is it easy to tell which part is defective? I'll be super careful installing the CPU, Linus also said they can be very fragile.

I will spend a significant amount of time reading and asking questions before I mess around with the BIOS, but you make a good point for ASUS with their noob friendly software.
How can you tell what a good PSU is? Whether it is of good quality and uninteruptible?

Yes, I will stick to an HDD and optical drive, and may in the future purchase an SSD, do I need an SSD? I know they improve loading times and boot up times significantly, but do they impact game performance at all?

It seems like building onto the motherboard is easy, and that maybe the cables and cords will be the trickier part.
Thank you so much for all your help and time!
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April 20, 2014 5:50:25 PM

As far as I know it's generally the standard for modern boards to have at least 1 pcie 3.0. They then have a number of the lesser slots but there is generally at least 1 3.0.

I never actually used newegg as I am more familiar with amazon and live near a microcenter. However I hear of a lot of people getting their stuff from newegg and they seem fine with it.

I don't know how much you budgeted for the case but check out the $90 fractal r4. It's pretty big, but there is a lot of space and airflow in there, and it's quiet. On a slightly higher price scale Corsair Air 540 looked interesting, although I have little experience with it aside from looking at others' nice looking builds.

Unless you see any weird discoloration somewhere (like burn marks or something leaked), or big gashes or like something snapped off I don't know how you would know something is defective without turning it on.

PSU and uninterruptable power supply (UPS) are two different objects. The psu is what feeds your computer, while the UPS is like a power strip with a big battery in it. The UPS charges up while everything is working fine (at least that's my understanding someone else feel free to correct me) and then if the power goes out or flickers badly the UPS takes over so your computer doesnt shut down. For obvious reasons this would be great during a BIOS update so it doesnt shut down mid update and kill the board. That being said, I never really bothered investing in one. I just don't do BIOS updates during lightning storms/power issue times.

In terms of PSU quality, there is some sort of chart floating around this site about the different tiers of psu. Generally seasonic and the higher end corsair psu series are good quality, and their are a few others that are great as well. Just don't skimp on the psu because it isnt "adding to performance" because the last thing you want is your computer's heart to give out in a few years and take other components with it because you didn't want to invest. I decided I wanted to invest in the AX760 from corsair, but you could definitely be fine with something cheaper

You don't really need an SSD, at most it will improve loading times between levels but not much else. However, boot times and program installs are quite fast and it's nice to not have a huge bottleneck from my hard drive anymore (I also started out with an HDD). An SSD is completely optional, but to me it did make things feel quicker and with your budget you could probably afford something in the 120 gb-240gb range easily as a boot drive. But again, completely optional (although keep in mind if you get it later you will have more stuff to get on the ssd later). However game performance impact is minimal.

It is easier than it sound sometimes, although a bit nerve-wracking that first time. Probably the most difficult part of building onto the board was getting the hyper 212 evo bracket on (it can be fairly annoying) followed by trying to get the stand-offs to line up. But in the end it all turned on more or less without a fuss

^**Just make sure everything is in all the way, nothing scarier than thinking one of your parts died when it turns out 1 of the RAM sticks wasnt all the way in, or, my favorite, the screen cable wasnt all the way in leading me to believe for 2 days that the computer wasnt starting properly

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April 20, 2014 7:47:42 PM

mc962 said:
As far as I know it's generally the standard for modern boards to have at least 1 pcie 3.0. They then have a number of the lesser slots but there is generally at least 1 3.0.

I never actually used newegg as I am more familiar with amazon and live near a microcenter. However I hear of a lot of people getting their stuff from newegg and they seem fine with it.

I don't know how much you budgeted for the case but check out the $90 fractal r4. It's pretty big, but there is a lot of space and airflow in there, and it's quiet. On a slightly higher price scale Corsair Air 540 looked interesting, although I have little experience with it aside from looking at others' nice looking builds.

Unless you see any weird discoloration somewhere (like burn marks or something leaked), or big gashes or like something snapped off I don't know how you would know something is defective without turning it on.

PSU and uninterruptable power supply (UPS) are two different objects. The psu is what feeds your computer, while the UPS is like a power strip with a big battery in it. The UPS charges up while everything is working fine (at least that's my understanding someone else feel free to correct me) and then if the power goes out or flickers badly the UPS takes over so your computer doesnt shut down. For obvious reasons this would be great during a BIOS update so it doesnt shut down mid update and kill the board. That being said, I never really bothered investing in one. I just don't do BIOS updates during lightning storms/power issue times.

In terms of PSU quality, there is some sort of chart floating around this site about the different tiers of psu. Generally seasonic and the higher end corsair psu series are good quality, and their are a few others that are great as well. Just don't skimp on the psu because it isnt "adding to performance" because the last thing you want is your computer's heart to give out in a few years and take other components with it because you didn't want to invest. I decided I wanted to invest in the AX760 from corsair, but you could definitely be fine with something cheaper

You don't really need an SSD, at most it will improve loading times between levels but not much else. However, boot times and program installs are quite fast and it's nice to not have a huge bottleneck from my hard drive anymore (I also started out with an HDD). An SSD is completely optional, but to me it did make things feel quicker and with your budget you could probably afford something in the 120 gb-240gb range easily as a boot drive. But again, completely optional (although keep in mind if you get it later you will have more stuff to get on the ssd later). However game performance impact is minimal.

It is easier than it sound sometimes, although a bit nerve-wracking that first time. Probably the most difficult part of building onto the board was getting the hyper 212 evo bracket on (it can be fairly annoying) followed by trying to get the stand-offs to line up. But in the end it all turned on more or less without a fuss

^**Just make sure everything is in all the way, nothing scarier than thinking one of your parts died when it turns out 1 of the RAM sticks wasnt all the way in, or, my favorite, the screen cable wasnt all the way in leading me to believe for 2 days that the computer wasnt starting properly



Good, very good, although 2 or more 3.0 slots would be nice. Newegg seems to be good, but the prices also seem to be a bit higher most of the time. That case is nice, I like it, it's a bit more than I was hoping to pay for but if it does what I need and has good airflow, then I think the price will be fine. Thank you!
Right, of course, that makes sense. It will be fun to build the computer, but I will be worried about all the possible ways it could screw up xD.

I've been looking at PSUs... They're a bit more pricey than I expected, I'm not even sure which ones are good and which ones are not. Those designated as 'gaming' in pcpartpicker.ca are always above $100.
The UPSs.... Dang those are pricey, very expensive. I will have to live without one at first, I won't do any updating during any storms or anything, but if you're gaming and the power goes out, can something break in the PC? Are the odds of something breaking due to loss of power, high?

Of course.... Can't skimp out on the power supply, but how do you know what is good? I'd like to avoid spending that much if I can. I'm pretty sure I will go with the GTX 770, and that frees up some money (I was originally indecisive between GTX 770 and 780).

I think I will pass on the SSD at the beginning and maybe get one later on, and worry about the troubles then haha. I like the sound of how speedy it is, but this build will be probably 99% for gaming, so I figure the extra money can go to something else. I see what you're saying, but the only issue with my build is the Canadian dollar isn't all that valuable now, and our taxes are bit high, so the build is more costly than meets the eye. Right now it's sitting at around $1,470 with the GTX 770, i5 4670k, Asus Gryphon, 8Gb 1600MHz Corsair Vengeance RAM and the other things I threw in, so taxes throw on an additional $191 or so at that price.

That's great, thank you for the encouraging words. So will there be directions for setting up the aftermarket fan (in this case the EVO 212)?
Ya..... Those little issues would give me quite a fright too. Thank you so much again!
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April 20, 2014 8:44:53 PM

Again, I never bought a UPS because I barely had the budget for the desktop I bought. It's an added layer of protection, but one you can live without. And I've probably updated the BIOS a grand total of 3 times since I got the board nearly a year ago: the first time because I thought my board wasnt working (it was), the second time because I thought there was some compatibility issue (everything still works fine), and the third time when I reinstalled Windows on my new SSD (because, I figured, such a big change I might as well). It's not like you will flashing a new BIOS every week like windows updates. At most you probably won't need to do it more than once a year, probably not even then. If you have a good psu and are plugged into a surge protector then you will likely be fine. I tend to shut down and unplug my desktop when I hear thunder, but for power outages it will be fine as long as it isnt cutting the power all the time. And power loss during something like gaming would probably lead to lost data and, at worst, corruption of files, but with a good psu I'm fairly certain it won't affect the hardware.

Generally stick to a good well known brand like Seasonic (considered the best generally) or Corsair. Make sure it has enough to power you components comfortably (so if your system takes 730W you probably don't want to risk a 750 W psu in case the power consumption spikes.

*Found it: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/284314-28-power-suppl...


Ah, my mind slipped into US dollars
As far as taxes, if you have tax holidays consider those (I bought all my parts then for that reason)

The directions that come with the EVO are, to put it kindly, really bad
There are some good guides on youtube for installation, I believe this might have been the one I used: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrnWVHdhGJ0
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April 20, 2014 9:13:06 PM
April 21, 2014 5:00:47 PM

mc962 said:
Again, I never bought a UPS because I barely had the budget for the desktop I bought. It's an added layer of protection, but one you can live without. And I've probably updated the BIOS a grand total of 3 times since I got the board nearly a year ago: the first time because I thought my board wasnt working (it was), the second time because I thought there was some compatibility issue (everything still works fine), and the third time when I reinstalled Windows on my new SSD (because, I figured, such a big change I might as well). It's not like you will flashing a new BIOS every week like windows updates. At most you probably won't need to do it more than once a year, probably not even then. If you have a good psu and are plugged into a surge protector then you will likely be fine. I tend to shut down and unplug my desktop when I hear thunder, but for power outages it will be fine as long as it isnt cutting the power all the time. And power loss during something like gaming would probably lead to lost data and, at worst, corruption of files, but with a good psu I'm fairly certain it won't affect the hardware.

Generally stick to a good well known brand like Seasonic (considered the best generally) or Corsair. Make sure it has enough to power you components comfortably (so if your system takes 730W you probably don't want to risk a 750 W psu in case the power consumption spikes.

*Found it: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/284314-28-power-suppl...


Ah, my mind slipped into US dollars
As far as taxes, if you have tax holidays consider those (I bought all my parts then for that reason)

The directions that come with the EVO are, to put it kindly, really bad
There are some good guides on youtube for installation, I believe this might have been the one I used: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrnWVHdhGJ0


Lmao, I will be in the same boat with the budget. That is good, I will keep the updating only to when it's necessary, like you. I will put money into a surge protector then, much less expensive for some peace of mind.

PCpartpicker.ca estimated power usage to be around 450w, but most people say 700-750 for gaming.
I don't know if we do... Kinda sad if we do, but I will look out for those days if we have some. Thank you for those links, if I hadn't chosen a solution already, one of your comments would certainly be my target for best solution.

Thank you so much! Signing up to this website has been the best decision yet for learning about PCs.
I haven't seen any trolling either, that is quite impressive.
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April 21, 2014 5:17:10 PM



Thank you so much for the links and the detailed response/advice. I will be consulting this comment for the final build. A lot of very nice looking MOBOs and PSUs for nice price that I totally missed. Thank you!
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April 21, 2014 6:02:23 PM

The 700w range psu is likely with multiple gpu / overclocking in mind. If you planned on eventually doing these power hungry activities you would need the bigger psu (it was my reasoning for my 760w psu). In reality the 600 w range is probably a better deal if you don't have more than 1 gpu, as long as you get a decent one (so you don't end up with something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVN6eOEPins)
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April 21, 2014 6:15:03 PM

mc962 said:
The 700w range psu is likely with multiple gpu / overclocking in mind. If you planned on eventually doing these power hungry activities you would need the bigger psu (it was my reasoning for my 760w psu). In reality the 600 w range is probably a better deal if you don't have more than 1 gpu, as long as you get a decent one (so you don't end up with something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVN6eOEPins)


So anything between 650-750w should be good then.
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April 21, 2014 6:31:44 PM

For a gtx 770, any quality psu 550-650. At 750w you could power sli gtx 760's and at 850w sli 780's, so 550-650 is good. The Antec 620w HCG semi-modular is the best value, its a top tier psu and usually on sale for @$60. It's also a very good fit for a 770.
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May 7, 2014 6:04:00 PM

Karadjgne said:
For a gtx 770, any quality psu 550-650. At 750w you could power sli gtx 760's and at 850w sli 780's, so 550-650 is good. The Antec 620w HCG semi-modular is the best value, its a top tier psu and usually on sale for @$60. It's also a very good fit for a 770.


Great! Thank you! I will look for it on sale, in CAD it's $94.99 now on Newegg.
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May 7, 2014 7:16:46 PM

for my personal opinion, if you plan to use cpu i5/i7 4770k, not sure you gonna play OC or not
but whatever, you should chose some better mobo like z87-g45 or something like that
look like you try to build some high level pc but with the basic cheap mobo,
not mean you cant, but the high level mobo may work better with your i7 and 770 though

(of course you can build with some $50 mobo, but you may lose some feature from i7 and 770)
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May 7, 2014 7:53:10 PM

Since the PCI-E controller is in the cpu, you loose nothing from the cpu and card. While some boards could not do PCI-E 3.0, these boards are all but gone now.

You may not get as good of a network card or sound card, may lack extras like more USB 3.0 ports and e-sata. You may even loose overclocking options from the bios or weaker voltage regulation system, but you will not loose any cpu or gpu features.

This was an issue years back when the pci-e and memory controller was part of the chipset and a lower chipset would cost you some performance. This should not be much of an issue with today's systems.
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May 9, 2014 7:20:04 PM

WalterHughes1986 said:
for my personal opinion, if you plan to use cpu i5/i7 4770k, not sure you gonna play OC or not
but whatever, you should chose some better mobo like z87-g45 or something like that
look like you try to build some high level pc but with the basic cheap mobo,
not mean you cant, but the high level mobo may work better with your i7 and 770 though

(of course you can build with some $50 mobo, but you may lose some feature from i7 and 770)


Good points, I've set my sights on that exact one, and also on the Maximus VI Hero. However, now that I'm aware of the Z97s, I may wait and see how they turn out. Thank you for the help!
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May 9, 2014 7:21:37 PM

nukemaster said:
Since the PCI-E controller is in the cpu, you loose nothing from the cpu and card. While some boards could not do PCI-E 3.0, these boards are all but gone now.

You may not get as good of a network card or sound card, may lack extras like more USB 3.0 ports and e-sata. You may even loose overclocking options from the bios or weaker voltage regulation system, but you will not loose any cpu or gpu features.

This was an issue years back when the pci-e and memory controller was part of the chipset and a lower chipset would cost you some performance. This should not be much of an issue with today's systems.


In that case, I care somewhat about overclocking, a lot about voltage regulation, quality, lifetime, and future upgradability.
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May 9, 2014 11:25:05 PM

MSI g45 gamer, Asus A, gigabyte udh3, ASRock extreme4.
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May 12, 2014 4:08:08 PM

Karadjgne said:
MSI g45 gamer, Asus A, gigabyte udh3, ASRock extreme4.


I've had the MSI G45 in my favorites for a while now, and am considering it, I will look at the other ones, thank you for the list. However, because the Z97s are coming out, I'm feeling inclined to get one of those for the Broadwell lineup.
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