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Will this build be good for the next generation of gaming?

Will this build be able to play next generation games at max or high settings?
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3trP7
10 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    For the same price you can get an SSD if you want:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($719.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Rosewill Galaxy-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ NCIX US)
    Keyboard: Razer DeathStalker Wired Gaming Keyboard ($68.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer Taipan Wired Laser Mouse ($64.99 @ Best Buy)
    Total: $1896.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-17 14:47 EDT-0400)

    But to answer your original question - yes. That will be a great build. The 780 Ti will be a great card for a good while maxed out, especially at high settings.
  2. Save you 1 cent lol, by changing the Ram to cheaper but yet the same, and better PSU and the Same Video also i added a SDD.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Rosewill Galaxy-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ NCIX US)
    Keyboard: Razer DeathStalker Wired Gaming Keyboard ($68.99 @ Best Buy)
    Mouse: Razer Taipan Wired Laser Mouse ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1891.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-17 14:52 EDT-0400)
  3. HiTechObsessed said:
    For the same price you can get an SSD if you want:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital BLACK SERIES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($719.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Rosewill Galaxy-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ NCIX US)
    Keyboard: Razer DeathStalker Wired Gaming Keyboard ($68.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer Taipan Wired Laser Mouse ($64.99 @ Best Buy)
    Total: $1896.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-17 14:47 EDT-0400)

    But to answer your original question - yes. That will be a great build. The 780 Ti will be a great card for a good while maxed out, especially at high settings.


    I wouldnt suggest those rams as there a bit slow from the current ones, and the PSU isnt that good.
  4. Games settings are generally based on CPU, graphics and ram and from looking it should be able to play next generation games on max settings.
  5. RAM speed has virtually no affect whatsoever on gaming performance, since games use VRAM for graphics.

    The Antec HCG series is built by SeaSonic, just like the XFX ProSeries is, and is a great PSU, so that comment makes no sense either.
  6. HiTechObsessed said:
    RAM speed has virtually no affect whatsoever on gaming performance, since games use VRAM for graphics.

    The Antec HCG series is built by SeaSonic, just like the XFX ProSeries is, and is a great PSU, so that comment makes no sense either.


    I agree with u on the Ram. But I still suggest he gets a much higher wattage for potentially SLI in the future.
  7. Then why would you recommend 750w if you're anticipating SLI in the future? 850w would be better for SLI. 750w puts you at a lower efficiency, and will be a good amount of stress on the PSU, no matter how good it is.
  8. HiTechObsessed said:
    Then why would you recommend 750w if you're anticipating SLI in the future? 850w would be better for SLI. 750w puts you at a lower efficiency, and will be a good amount of stress on the PSU, no matter how good it is.


    750W is enough for GTX 780Ti SLI
  9. As I said, it will put you in lower efficiency, and isn't good in the long run at that high of a usage level. A system running two 780 Ti's will peak around 625-650w. That's putting a lot of load onto a 750w power supply for the long run.
  10. HiTechObsessed said:
    As I said, it will put you in lower efficiency, and isn't good in the long run at that high of a usage level. A system running two 780 Ti's will peak around 625-650w. That's putting a lot of load onto a 750w power supply for the long run.


    Okay i'll change the PSU to a higher Wattage and get a cheaper RAM just for ur sake.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($78.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($689.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: Rosewill Galaxy-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
    Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ NCIX US)
    Keyboard: Razer DeathStalker Wired Gaming Keyboard ($68.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer Taipan Wired Laser Mouse ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1891.85
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-17 15:38 EDT-0400)
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