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Question about changing PCB's on a Western Digital drive

Tags:
  • Western Digital
  • Chip
  • Storage
  • Enclosure
Last response: in Storage
April 18, 2014 12:46:57 PM

Hello all, I have a WD5000AAJS drive that seems to have been damaged during a storm. It used to be inside an external enclosure and I think it got a surge. I've taken the drive out of the enclosure and took off the PCB. My understanding is that these drives have drive relevant data stored on the U12 chips or if there's no U12 chip then it'll be on the Marvell chip. My question is about whether or not my PCB has a U12 chip. All the videos and walk throughs I've seen involve a an 8 legged U12 chip. I'm not seeing that on mine but there's a U12 label printed on the board and what I think might be a U12 chip. Can someone confirm or deny that for me? Here are a couple of pictures. First is the whole PCB with the foam. You can see the burn marks on the foam. The U12 label is on the right side of the picture between the 2nd and 3rd screw holes. Second picture is a zoomed in and cropped picture of that area.





The text on top of the chip in the 2nd picture says 25.000 and then below says 729V. So my question is - is this chip really the U12 chip or is my drive info stored on the Marvell chip? I see what looks like a spot for an 8 connector chip below the U12 label and it's obviously empty. I'm hoping I have the U12 in that other chip because you can see from the foam that the Marvell chip looks fried. Thanks in advanced.

Edit: Forgot to mention what the drive is doing in case it matters. It does nothing. I've tried it in a new external enclosure and also tried it as an internal drive in my desktop. It doesn't spin up or make any noise.

More about : question changing pcb western digital drive

a b G Storage
April 18, 2014 12:53:43 PM

Those 8 pins are the solder points for the U12 the small one next to U12 is a resistor(R66) yours does not appear to have a U12 chip.
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Best solution

a c 75 G Storage
April 18, 2014 1:21:52 PM

Anyone giving tutorials online for this doesn't understand the complexity of these types of issues.
even if you were able to resolder the appropriate chip with the adaptives, you'd have no guarantee that the FW modules were compatible or that the abrupt power loss didn't kill the heads or cause head bounce.
Also...was this in a third party enclosure or originally an external hard drive. Modern WD drives house smartware encryption on the bridge board so you'll need an identical one to recover the data if that's the case.
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