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Can you connect a pc to a wifi repeater via the RJ45 port? (wired)

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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April 21, 2014 4:30:48 AM

In the new house I'll be moving into (as a student so no real say on changes within reason) there will be a router in the main area. I don't fancy running a cable between the two as it will get in the way but I need it to be a wired connection for my pc. so would getting some plug in repeaters be possible and connect my pc to the rj45 port on the repeater or would it be best to get a wifi card for the pc?

More about : connect wifi repeater rj45 port wired

April 21, 2014 5:03:39 AM

If all you are trying to do is get a ethernet connection for your PC and do not have a need to extend the actual wireless signal I would avoid actual "repeaters". These send out a second wireless signal (ie the repeated data) that interference with the original signal.

If you get good signal in the room where the PC is located then something like a USB wireless card is going to be easiest.

If you want to go with a ethernet connected device you want what is called a client-bridge. Most "repeaters" can also run in this mode but they sell cheaper versions that are used for game consoles or tv that do not have wireless. These many times are called gaming adapters.

The reason you would want to go with a client-bridge rather than a adapter in your machine is if you get poor signal in your room. It allows you to use the ethernet cable to locate the device closer to the main router where it may get better signal. You can also get devices with directional antenna.

Still if the signal is not good in your room you may be better off with the above suggestion to use powerline adapters instead.
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April 21, 2014 8:26:14 AM

So you can connect a pc to the repeater using an ethernet cable and it isn't just(if at all) there to give a wired signal for the repeater to boost wirelessly? So basically is that port on a powerline adapter an input or an output. They just cause interference so only use if the signal is weak in the required room. So if the signal is weak, get an adapter and if it is strong then just get a wireless card for my rig, right?

This client bridge will connect to the wireless signal from the router and provide a place where wired devices can connect through it using it's lan ports?

My accommodation is supposed to be getting rid of the routers in the house and replacing them with the wireless spots that are put on the ceiling/walls such like in office buildings thus removing any wired connections from the house. Will this client bridge still be fine with these and still give access through a wired connection just like with a router?
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April 21, 2014 9:01:56 AM

Hard to tell what question you still have.

There will still be a router someplace in the house but if they put in wireless AP (hotspot) in each room it should work very well. You can use a client-bridge if you choose to it will be the same connecting to a AP as connecting to a router.
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April 22, 2014 6:27:29 AM

Basically is the rj45 port on the repeater used to connect itself to the router for a stronger signal or to connect itself to a wired device?
As long as it doesn't matter between a router/client bridge or a wireless ap/client bridge setup that's fine.
It's basically a choice between router or wireless ap. Wireless ap giving a stronger wireless connection but I need to figure out how best to connect my pc to the network basically, wireless card or client bridge. What you're saying is I could put a client bridge in my room, it would connect to the wireless signal and I could run a cable from it to my rig, right?
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April 22, 2014 6:44:09 AM

A client-bridge is mostly used on a end device that does not have any other option to get wireless. Game consoles or tv you can't put PCI cards inside and many have very limited support of USB wireless cards. Some tv you must buy a expensive one from the manufacture.

For a PC it is a much harder call. You could use a USB device on the PC to get wireless or you could hook the client-bridge to the ethernet port. In most cases there will be almost no difference in the wireless performance when you put the client-bridge device right next to the PC.

The best example of use of a client-bridge on a pc where it almost always performs better are the question we get on this forum of "how do I share the neighbors internet" In these cases you can place the client-bridge outside and use long ethernet cable to bring the signal in rather than trying to get the signal though the walls.
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April 22, 2014 7:32:48 AM

Do you have any client-bridges you would recommend or any sites in particular? I've seen some edimax ones for around £20, does this seem reasonable to you?
Thanks for your help, much appreciated!

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April 22, 2014 8:00:52 AM

That is tough call. Most my experience with client-bridge devices is ether with outdoor stuff from companies like enenius ens200 or I use some random old router loaded with dd-wrt. The outdoor units tend to be more expensive because they work outdoors.

The largest complain I have heard about cheap extenders is they require you to set them up via WPS button. You really want one that you can also setup via a pc somehow. WPS is extremely insecure and is always recommended you disable the feature in the router. This would mean you need access to the router to enable and disable the WPS option. I have no knowledge of the units you mention so this may not be a issue.
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