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Does this sound to you like my GFx card is about to die?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 21, 2014 7:07:50 AM

For the past few days my Nvidia display driver has been crashing constantly into a black screen for a few seconds then recovering. (Link to the error message | http://prntscr.com/3c21v5)

I updated my gfx card drivers and it still does it!

Also as well when I am playing CS GO on steam the game constantly crashes and the textures go really really strange and then freeze, so to fix it I press Ctrl alt and delete since that's the only thing that works as I cant alt tab out of the game. This is a new occurrence just after my display drivers started to bug out.

Basic Specs - Windows 7 professional 64bit, Nvidia GTX 550ti, Intel i7 3770k and 16GB DDR3 Ram

Any advice or answers to why it is doing this would be great thanks!

More about : sound gfx card die

April 21, 2014 7:13:15 AM

CliCy said:
For the past few days my Nvidia display driver has been crashing constantly into a black screen for a few seconds then recovering. (Link to the error message | http://prntscr.com/3c21v5)

I updated my gfx card drivers and it still does it!

Also as well when I am playing CS GO on steam the game constantly crashes and the textures go really really strange and then freeze, so to fix it I press Ctrl alt and delete since that's the only thing that works as I cant alt tab out of the game. This is a new occurrence just after my display drivers started to bug out.

Basic Specs - Windows 7 professional 64bit, Nvidia GTX 550ti, Intel i7 3770k and 16GB DDR3 Ram

Any advice or answers to why it is doing this would be great thanks!



This is caused by your gpu running unstable.

The most common scenario alot of people experience this issue, is when they are overclocking and the card is unstable. Is your card running stock or OC? If its OC't then try reseting to factory standard.

Could also be caused by a failing psu. If the psu is starting to die out on you, its not garanteed that its giving the right amount of AMP ( or voltage for that matter) on the rail. So its card is not overclocked / reseting it doesn't solve the problem, then try using a different psu.
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April 21, 2014 7:18:41 AM

No Im not overclocking at all! and Ive had the PC for about a year and a half so wouldnt the 2nd option be a newly built issue not a old ish one?
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April 21, 2014 7:45:32 AM

If the system has not been cleaned out in that time it's possible the graphics card and/or the CPU are overheating.
Use GPU-Z to check the graphics card, it should be below 50C with the system idle and use Speedfan, Realtemp or Coretemp for the CPU, 30-40C is about normal at idle.
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Best solution

April 21, 2014 7:48:44 AM

CliCy said:
No Im not overclocking at all! and Ive had the PC for about a year and a half so wouldnt the 2nd option be a newly built issue not a old ish one?


No, psu's will perform less and less the older it gets. How fast it tires out depends on the quality, and ofc there can be a "glich" / small error with the product from the factory. But then again that is why we have warranties.

- Take your gpu out clean the PCI connector both the motherboard and gpu side of it.
- Clean the gpu for dust (a vacuum cleaner and / or a air compressor would do the trick nicely.
- Make sure that its properly connected to the motherboard after reinstalling it.
- Check for damage or poor connection on your cables.
- Check your gpu temps.
- Try a different psu.

These are the things i suggest you start with (in that order). If that still doens't solve the issue, then let me know.
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April 21, 2014 7:56:57 AM

Do NOT use a vacuum cleaner! The brushes are quite coarse and may damage components and they produce a lot of static electricity when running, which is the last thing you want to put anywhere near to delicate microelectronics.
Either use a can of gas, available at most computer stores, or the old fashioned way-a soft brush and blowing the dust clear.
If the system is dusty, it'll probably be a good idea to do it outside. ;) 
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April 21, 2014 8:19:17 AM

coozie7 said:
Do NOT use a vacuum cleaner! The brushes are quite coarse and may damage components and they produce a lot of static electricity when running, which is the last thing you want to put anywhere near to delicate microelectronics.
Either use a can of gas, available at most computer stores, or the old fashioned way-a soft brush and blowing the dust clear.
If the system is dusty, it'll probably be a good idea to do it outside. ;) 



There's no harm using a vacuum cleaner (but take notice that i'm not talking about your regulare household one).



This is the type you use to clean out hardware, like the gpu cooler that i was talking about earlier. Static electricity mainly occurs do to high vacuum pressure, which is not the case with the little handy once.
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