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New PC Build - High End Gaming

Hey guys,
I've been reading Tom's for ages but never asked anything so here we go :-)

I've been running a laptop setup for 3 years now (Asus G73, i7, Nvidia GTX460M 2GB, 8GB ram, 256GB SSD) but it's time for a change. The battery has died completely 3 times, and since I'm tired of having a 'portable desktop' it's time for a desktop with some power.

I've been researching for a week on and off now and here's what I've come up with:

Processor: INTEL CORE i7-4770 3,40GHZ LGA1150 PROCESOR - performance per dollar sounds good
Video Card: GTX 780 - not sure which manufacturer yet.
Hard Drive: Keep my existing Samsung 840 256GB SSD
Memory: ???
Secondary Hard drive: 2TB ????
Motherboard: ????
Power Supply: 800W min according to what I've read more or less but this is still very general. Not sure on manufacturers yet.
Case: NZXT Phantom 410

Basically I'd like some advice from the community on all components, but hey, whatever you can suggest I'd be thankful.

I want to use the PC primarily for gaming and office work. Right now I'm doing nothing more than Diablo 3, but I want to get Titanfall on here.

Monitor wise, I'm currently using a Dell U2312HM IPS panel which I'm very happy with, but I'll probably upgrade to something bigger 27-30" later this year, maybe next year.

Budget-wise I'm flexible but if I pay a premium I like to make sure I'm getting a sweet performance difference. The Asus G73 I listed above cost me about $2300 total 3 years back and has kept me happy. I'm trying to stay under that with this build.

Let me know your thoughts.

Bart
15 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about build high end gaming
  1. The I5 4670K would be best for Gaming and light office work and it would save you almost 100$ that you could put towards a Graphics card, but we need to know your firm budget to better help you with your build?
  2. As said above, you'd probably be better off with an i5 4670K, grab any Z87 motherboard that you'd like. With an i7 4770 (non-K) you won't see any major performance advantages to an i5 4670K, and if you overclock the 4670K it's likely that you'll get better performance from that anyways.

    You may or may not have to buy a new copy of Windows if you migrate your existing SSD to a new system configuration - keep that in mind. Microsoft does lock some copies of Windows to hardware.

    As for memory, how about this?
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231538
    G.Skill Ripjaws X 1866 CL 8 / 8GB

    what you're looking for is the lowest combination of frequency and cas latency. You really don't need more than 8GB for what you describe, but more is always optional, I guess.
  3. Best answer
    Here you go. Take a loo at this. This is my build.

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3vUPv
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3vUPv/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3vUPv/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($7.81 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte G1.Sniper Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($167.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($154.00 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.81 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($564.80 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($564.80 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 750D ATX Full Tower Case
    Power Supply: Corsair RM 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($144.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($23.29 @ Amazon)
    Total: $2182.45
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-21 16:38 EDT-0400)
  4. Ok, here's a very high end build for well under your budget:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($309.99 @ Newegg)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($71.99 @ Mwave)
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-Pro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($166.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($82.99 @ NCIX US)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB Video Card ($669.99 @ NCIX US)
    Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Gunmetal/Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.99 @ Mwave)
    Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8.1 - 64-bit (OEM) (64-bit) ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
    Total: $1665.89
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-21 16:40 EDT-0400)
  5. do you need an OS, monitor, or keyboard/mouse?
  6. http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Danbuscus250/saved/4rlD
    CPU Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core $309.99
    CPU Cooler Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid $89.99
    Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Formula ATX LGA1150 $284.99
    Memory G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 $144.99
    Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM $56.98
    Video Card Gigabyte Radeon R9 290X 4GB $549.99
    Video Card Gigabyte Radeon R9 290X 4GB $549.99
    Case Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower $119.99
    Power Supply XFX 850W ATX12V / EPS12V $134.88
    Optical Drive Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer $15.98
    Total: $2257.77

    heres my take on it, you can OC this thing like a boss, and i usually pick amd for the graphics card when using more than 1 card for the extra vram :D
  7. Guess I'm just an Nvidia fan boy.
  8. well, nvidea vs amd is pretty controversial, as both have their ups and downs. one of amd's ups is that it has more vram, so i usually go with amd for multi-card setups. nvidia has some nice features, like cuda, thaat make it the card of choice for most media related things.
  9. Why would I go dual SLI rather than single card? From what I've heard, Titanfall won't utilize the dual card setup at all. Does this depend on the game? Realistically, that's a +$500 extra investment so it should make a huge difference. If not, I'd just get a single card.

    For gaming, would I really need to crank the CPU anyway? At these speeds and 4th gen intel, I'm assuming the processor can handle just about anything and the GPU with be the likely bottleneck. Is there really a difference that I can squeeze out of the K series chips? I'm not an overclocker, but I could always fiddle with things if there was good reason...
  10. well, if you dont want to overclock you can drop the K, and cut off $130 for the mobo. and you wont really need to overclock it for games yet, maybe in a couple years though. and sli/crossfire doesnt scale 100%, and it really depends on the game. if you would rather save $500 than get an extra ~30fps in some games, its your choice.
  11. Lets be honest here...in a couple of years, this computer will be a trade in since it won't run next gen games. 3-4 years has always been that time line.

    But about the $500 difference, this setup we're talking about here should run any game currently produced or anything that will come out within the next year at 60 fps at maxed graphics (and yes there are exceptions but generally for mainstream games this is the case). Would you agree?
  12. In reference to: Video Card: GTX 780 - not sure which manufacturer yet.

    What would you suggest? EVGA? MSI? ASUS?
  13. yes, a single 290X or 780 Ti can probly handle games maxed for about another year or so.
  14. bartkomorowski said:
    Why would I go dual SLI rather than single card? From what I've heard, Titanfall won't utilize the dual card setup at all. Does this depend on the game? Realistically, that's a +$500 extra investment so it should make a huge difference. If not, I'd just get a single card.

    For gaming, would I really need to crank the CPU anyway? At these speeds and 4th gen intel, I'm assuming the processor can handle just about anything and the GPU with be the likely bottleneck. Is there really a difference that I can squeeze out of the K series chips? I'm not an overclocker, but I could always fiddle with things if there was good reason...


    I run Titanfall on my SLI setup. With no problem.
  15. bartkomorowski said:
    In reference to: Video Card: GTX 780 - not sure which manufacturer yet.

    What would you suggest? EVGA? MSI? ASUS?



    I have the the EVGA 780 SuperClocked and i love them.
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