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Salvageable Parts from Old PC to New Gaming PC?

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April 23, 2014 7:25:02 PM

Basically, I want to cut down the price I'll have to dish out for my new build and I thought that maybe I could re-use some components from my 2007 HP Pavillion Desktop.

It's practically about to die on me as it suddenly went on a rapid performance decline. You guys think I can use the optical drive on it and power supply, which I believe is 500W? If there's anything else you think I can salvage, do please tell me. I can try to find the specifications of the components if that'll help ya^
a b 4 Gaming
a b α HP
April 23, 2014 7:40:42 PM

The optical drive should be good. The RAM, if DDR3 may be re-usable, at least temporarily (it might be DDR3-1066 CAS10 or something similarly slow). If there's a case fan, it could be re-used if not choked by dust.
I'd only consider re-using the PSU if it is 80+; otherwise it may not actually be good for 500W, even if it isn't the outright junk that would cause expensive warranty problems.
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April 23, 2014 7:53:19 PM

You don't say what your intention for your 'new build' is. The last thing I would try to salvage is a 7 yr old power supply. PSU's can deteriorate over time and won't offer the voltage regulation and original specs. Also, being an HP, it could possibly have proprietary connectors which won't match up with newer mobo's. The RAM is likely DDR2 and won't work in a modern mobo as the notch alignment won't fit. You can save the HDD, likely a SATA1, and use it to store pictures or music or use it as your main drive if you don't mind the slower access speed. The video is likely PCI and is usable but you're not going to do First-Person-Shooters with it. So......congratulations; you've just saved the $20 cost of a new CD drive!
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a b 4 Gaming
April 23, 2014 7:56:40 PM

I wouldn't trust the PSU. I've never seen a PSU in an HP build that wasn't known to explode under stress.

The optical drive, certainly.
Probably the HDD as well. Though tbh it's a possible reason for the decline if it's dying.
Maybe the RAM if it's DDR3. Though I suppose it's also a possible reason for the decline, so you'd need to find out.
Possibly the case, though I know HP has some proprietary cases.

If you call Microsoft tech support you may also get them to give you a new CD key so you can reuse your copy of Windows.
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April 23, 2014 8:20:35 PM

Rationale said:
I wouldn't trust the PSU. I've never seen a PSU in an HP build that wasn't known to explode under stress.

The optical drive, certainly.
Probably the HDD as well. Though tbh it's a possible reason for the decline if it's dying.
Maybe the RAM if it's DDR3. Though I suppose it's also a possible reason for the decline, so you'd need to find out.
Possibly the case, though I know HP has some proprietary cases.

If you call Microsoft tech support you may also get them to give you a new CD key so you can reuse your copy of Windows.


Oh I had forgot to mention that the original PSU had already blown from stress :lol:  Around 2 years ago, a family friend replaced it with a new one due to supposed low wattage so it's possibly much higher quality than your average HP PSU. Guess I'll have to crack the case open to see what kind of a PSU and RAM it has.

That CD key from Microsoft tech support though. How does that work? They would give me the option to install my current Windows on a new PC for free?
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April 23, 2014 8:21:44 PM

DelroyMonjo said:
You don't say what your intention for your 'new build' is. The last thing I would try to salvage is a 7 yr old power supply. PSU's can deteriorate over time and won't offer the voltage regulation and original specs. Also, being an HP, it could possibly have proprietary connectors which won't match up with newer mobo's. The RAM is likely DDR2 and won't work in a modern mobo as the notch alignment won't fit. You can save the HDD, likely a SATA1, and use it to store pictures or music or use it as your main drive if you don't mind the slower access speed. The video is likely PCI and is usable but you're not going to do First-Person-Shooters with it. So......congratulations; you've just saved the $20 cost of a new CD drive!


Every little piece counts!
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a b 4 Gaming
April 23, 2014 8:29:56 PM

CeroDavid said:


That CD key from Microsoft tech support though. How does that work? They would give me the option to install my current Windows on a new PC for free?


Most operating systems that come with prebuilt PCs are OEM - for all intents and purposes, this means they get locked to your motherboard and can't be transferred to a new PC.

This isn't to force you to buy a new OS if you upgrade; it's actually a lopsided way to protect the customer. Microsoft tech support is prohibited from offering help to owners of illegitimate or secondhand copies of Windows, so locking OEM Windows to a single motherboard is to stop you from selling a duplicate copy of Windows, and to prevent the buyer from being deprived of tech support.

If the tech support people believe that you're really just replacing your motherboard and that you are not selling or duplicating a copy of Windows, they will often give you a new key so that you can keep using your legally purchased copy of Windows with a new motherboard.

At least, that's how Google explains it.
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April 23, 2014 8:34:28 PM

Onus said:
The optical drive should be good. The RAM, if DDR3 may be re-usable, at least temporarily (it might be DDR3-1066 CAS10 or something similarly slow). If there's a case fan, it could be re-used if not choked by dust.
I'd only consider re-using the PSU if it is 80+; otherwise it may not actually be good for 500W, even if it isn't the outright junk that would cause expensive warranty problems.


Yeah I figured the optical drive was the one sure thing that could be replaced. Gonna have to take a deeper look then though I'm pretty sure the fan's full of dust....so I guess that rules one thing out. What do you mean by 80+? I wouldn't want to fry a new PC with faulty equipment after all.
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a b 4 Gaming
April 23, 2014 8:40:40 PM

CeroDavid said:
Onus said:
The optical drive should be good. The RAM, if DDR3 may be re-usable, at least temporarily (it might be DDR3-1066 CAS10 or something similarly slow). If there's a case fan, it could be re-used if not choked by dust.
I'd only consider re-using the PSU if it is 80+; otherwise it may not actually be good for 500W, even if it isn't the outright junk that would cause expensive warranty problems.


Yeah I figured the optical drive was the one sure thing that could be replaced. Gonna have to take a deeper look then though I'm pretty sure the fan's full of dust....so I guess that rules one thing out. What do you mean by 80+? I wouldn't want to fry a new PC with faulty equipment after all.


Power supplies use an 80+ rating system. The 80 means 80%, which means the PSU is 80% or more efficient.

In order from worst to best:

not rated (pure crap, do not buy)
80+ (acceptable quality as long as you don't stress it)
80+ Bronze (good quality, very common)
80+ Silver (better quality, not too common since it's such a small range between bronze and gold)
80+ Gold (great quality, still pretty common)
80+ Platinum (superb quality, rare)
80+ Titanium (the absolute best quality, almost impossible to find and pointlessly expensive)
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April 23, 2014 8:59:21 PM

Rationale said:
CeroDavid said:


That CD key from Microsoft tech support though. How does that work? They would give me the option to install my current Windows on a new PC for free?


Most operating systems that come with prebuilt PCs are OEM - for all intents and purposes, this means they get locked to your motherboard and can't be transferred to a new PC.

This isn't to force you to buy a new OS if you upgrade; it's actually a lopsided way to protect the customer. Microsoft tech support is prohibited from offering help to owners of illegitimate or secondhand copies of Windows, so locking OEM Windows to a single motherboard is to stop you from selling a duplicate copy of Windows, and to prevent the buyer from being deprived of tech support.

If the tech support people believe that you're really just replacing your motherboard and that you are not selling or duplicating a copy of Windows, they will often give you a new key so that you can keep using your legally purchased copy of Windows with a new motherboard.

At least, that's how Google explains it.


Sweet, I might just try to transfer Windows Vista to the new motherboard. I had no idea there was a PSU rating system either. Thanks for the quick lesson^
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