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First PC build

I'm new to PC building. What parts would you replace? Is everything compatible? This PC is mainly for gaming and some video editing. Thanks.

PC Rig: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/3ySgl
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about build
  1. Good spec's. If your ok with the price
  2. AgentTran said:
    For mainly gaming, downgrade the i7 4770k to the i5 4670k. It will yield virtually the same performance in gaming, and for some video editing, it should sustain as well. Keep your 4770k however if you are going to pursue much more video editing, rendering and other work-related programs in the future.

    Once you downgrade the processor, you should have some money left over. You could put the money into a stronger GPU, but you might need to branch out some money. (770 to a 780 is not cheap.)

    Also, if you're not doing major video editing, downgrade the RAM to just 8GB. 16GB is useless for gaming.

    I would also get a better PSU. Corsair is alright, but XFX, Seasonic and Antec are much better choices.
    Your current PSU will set you back $80, but I don't count MIR's so its at $90 right now. Here is the XFX/Antec/Seasonic equivalent that I would recommend over the Corsair one.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 650W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $89.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:24 EDT-0400)

    It's semi-modular and is by Sea Sonic, one of the most respected brands in the business.
    If you're looking for a little bit more wattage, you could go with a non-modular PSU and have extra power at your disposal, here is an example:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: XFX 750W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $89.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:25 EDT-0400)

    If you can put down some extra money for an even better quality PSU, or put the money saved on the RAM and CPU towards this, you can probably get something very good such as:($100 range)

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $99.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:31 EDT-0400)


    I will make some changes to my PSU, but i will keep my cpu because video editing is a big thing i will be doing (sorry i guess that wasnt clear) i'm unsure with my ram still though.
  3. Best answer
    For mainly gaming, downgrade the i7 4770k to the i5 4670k. It will yield virtually the same performance in gaming, and for some video editing, it should sustain as well. Keep your 4770k however if you are going to pursue much more video editing, rendering and other work-related programs in the future.

    Once you downgrade the processor, you should have some money left over. You could put the money into a stronger GPU, but you might need to branch out some money. (770 to a 780 is not cheap.)

    Also, if you're not doing major video editing, downgrade the RAM to just 8GB. 16GB is useless for gaming.

    I would also get a better PSU. Corsair is alright, but XFX, Seasonic and Antec are much better choices.
    Your current PSU will set you back $80, but I don't count MIR's so its at $90 right now. Here is the XFX/Antec/Seasonic equivalent that I would recommend over the Corsair one.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 650W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $89.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:24 EDT-0400)

    It's semi-modular and is by Sea Sonic, one of the most respected brands in the business.
    If you're looking for a little bit more wattage, you could go with a non-modular PSU and have extra power at your disposal, here is an example:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: XFX 750W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $89.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:25 EDT-0400)

    If you can put down some extra money for an even better quality PSU, or put the money saved on the RAM and CPU towards this, you can probably get something very good such as:($100 range)

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    Power Supply: SeaSonic 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $99.99
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-26 13:31 EDT-0400)
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