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Is dual ssd Raid 0 worth it?

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April 26, 2014 10:05:32 PM

For real world performance is dual ssd raid zero worth the added risk of data loss and the financial investment?

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a b G Storage
April 26, 2014 10:14:59 PM

depends on the RAID... if you're talking RAID 0, then no. RAID 1, sure.
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a b G Storage
April 26, 2014 10:16:44 PM

Yes for RAID 0, forget the above answer. There is almost no diference in risk compared to only 1 SSD, as you would have a backup running anyways, right? Moreover, since the SSDs would be exactly the same, they would both end up "failing" around the same time as if it was only one. And to conclude assuming you are on a 500GB ssd or more, that time would be more then 23 years.

And having 1 volume less to manage is always welcome
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a b G Storage
April 26, 2014 10:41:00 PM

leandrodafontoura said:
Yes for RAID 0, forget the above answer. There is almost no diference in risk compared to only 1 SSD, as you would have a backup running anyways, right? Moreover, since the SSDs would be exactly the same, they would both end up "failing" around the same time as if it was only one. And to conclude assuming you are on a 500GB ssd or more, that time would be more then 23 years.

And having 1 volume less to manage is always welcome


I don't want to get into an argument, but you're answer is not technically correct.

The failure rate of a RAID 0 setup is the x^(y*2), where x = failure rate of 1 drive and y= the number of drives... so a RAID 0 array featuring 2 hard drives with a 1.5% chance of failure in 1 year of use would have a failure rate of 1.5^(2*2) = 5% chance of failure in 1 year. A typical SSD with a GOOD uninterruptable power supply, a solid surge protector and an excellent PSU fails at about 1.25% in a year, which is roughly in line with the rate of failure of a normal hard drive. The problem with SSDs is, they're literally only as reliable as the power they get... So a power failure, or a bad power supply, or a power surge from bad power lines and no solid surge protector will pretty much corrupt a perfectly fine SSD. Now if you have a solid uninterruptable power system, a good surge protector and an excellent PSU, then sure, the risks of running a RAID 0 setup on your computer are no different then they are with a normal hard drive. If you lack those parts, then you'll see an astronomical increase in failure rate of your RAID setup.

Now setting the practicalities and statistics aside about the nature of a RAID 0 setup and the dependability of it, generally speaking a good SSD in a RAID 0 setup is too fast for the CPU to keep up. Even a top of the line intel will see almost no improvement in performance from a RAID 0 setup with SSDs, as the bottleneck once again shifts back to the CPU.

So with almost no appreciable improvement in performance and a much higher failure rate waiting for you, generally speaking a RAID 0 setup of SSDs is discouraged. Now there are some arguments that could be made about a RAID 10 or RAID 1 setup being beneficial... but RAID 10 is out of the conversation because the OP stated he was planning to use 2 SSDs, not 4... so as i said before in my prior post, if the OP wants a RAID 1 setup, sure he'll see some benefit.

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