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First Build GAMING PC (Is this good enough for mainstream gaming?)

Tags:
  • Gaming
  • Build
  • Systems
  • Compatibility
Last response: in Systems
April 27, 2014 12:47:03 AM

This is my propose pc build.
http://

I pick the parts based on the compatibility from the website. Although i don't know IF this parts is really compatible in actual building. I just pick and pick and pick with price watch.

*I'm tight on budget.
*Casual Gamer
*GTX 770 is too expensive for me

My Concerns are:

1. Do I need an SSD? or Is this SSD too much for this build? and maybe opt for cheaper ones?

2. Do I need a CPU Cooler even if if this build can't overclock?

3. Is the 500W enough power supply?

4. Can this Cases fit them all?

http://
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5. Do I need a 23" Monitor for 1080p? (i'm not sure about this question)

6. Suggestions for other 760 brand and for the Mobo.

I Need Feedbacks Thank You.

More about : build gaming good mainstream gaming

Best solution

April 27, 2014 1:03:08 AM

You do not need an SSD; I work with huge images and video games and while an SSD helps with speed performance, its really only 5-10FPS at most and you may end up burning it too fast with update writes. I'd suggest the smallest 1080p monitor you can find (personally I prefer high DPI over stretched images). I'd suggest a 600w power supply, and the first case you suggested should fit almost any graphics card you throw at it (just don't do that literally). You can also use programs like CRU to add 1920x1080 to monitor that don't "support" 1080p; some monitors are sold with forced down EDIDs even when the pixel count it much higher than the max "native" that the EDID provides. For a main drive I would suggest getting a fast, large mechanical drive rather than a couple smaller ones because while an SSD is fun and fast, it gets to be a pain to setup locational based events (downloads, installs, documents and media; similar to small main drives; ie 160- and 80GB mechanicals). I own a WD Black 2TB SATA 6GB/s drive and it serves me well as a main OS dual-booted drive.

(update) If you can find a GTX 750(for a cheaper price) it might suit you better if you don't intend to do anything demanding and you could fit it easier under a 500w roof. I'd suggest buying an aftermarket fan no matter what, Intel fans are pretty much garbage for extended use.
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April 27, 2014 1:20:08 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H87-D3H ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($101.24 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($72.24 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($80.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.98 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 760 2GB DirectCU II Video Card ($249.99 @ Micro Center)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $829.41
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-04-27 04:13 EDT-0400)

-H87 chipset motherboard since you're not overclocking.
-Better quality psu.
-Better quality case.

1. SSD is up to you.
2. No, the stock cooler should suffice.
3. Yes, but the cougar psu isn't very good quality. This XFX one is high quality.
4. Yes, but the Corsair 200R is a better quality case.
5. 23" is not necessary, as 1080p monitors can be find in a variety of the sizes. 23" is just the standard norm because 21.5" is a bit small for people. If you're fine with 21.5" or 22", then go for it.
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April 27, 2014 10:42:52 PM

thank you for the help.
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